Archive | August 27th, 2011

After a six-month struggle, Libya’s rebels have seized power. We look at Tripoli in rebel hands and, in a second article, at the new people now in control

NOVANEWS

Libya

The birth of free Libya

 

WESTERN governments could hardly have hoped for a better finale. Libyans themselves finished off the regime’s reign in the capital, enabling NATO to retreat to the wings and refute the last flourish of the colonel’s spokesman, Musa Ibrahim, delivered on a crackly radio, that the conquest was the work of imperialism. Liberation came from the west, not the east, allaying Tripoli’s fears of a Benghazi takeover. The doomsday scenarios of a bloody civil war in the streets proved mercifully overblown.

Colonel Muammar Qaddafi had fled his headquarters at Bab al-Aziziya. Rebels, denied their ultimate prize of his head, made do with kicking a gold-plated replica they found in the grounds, posing on the iconic statue of a fist grasping an American fighter jet (see picture) and torching his ceremonial tent. The last big battle occurred on the highway between Zawiya and Tripoli. The city itself escaped largely unscarred, the glass blocks housing the capital’s banks continuing to gleam unshattered. Rebel radio issued incessant calls against looting government buildings (they are your buildings, said the announcer, to the soothing strains of a twangy southern guitar), against harming captured prisoners and, optimistically in a capital now awash with arms of all kinds, against using guns to settle old scores.

After Tripoli most other fronts appeared to crumble. Rebel forces from the east overcame loyalist fighters who had hemmed them in for months outside Brega and pushed on to Ras Lanuf and Bin Jawad, whose tribesmen had hitherto remained loyal. Sirte, the stronghold of Colonel Qaddafi’s tribe on the coast, continued to stay the eastern advance to the capital. But loyalist forces are squeezed in a receding central buffer from Sirte on the coast to Sebha in the desert. Even in Sebha, the ancestral home of Abdullah el-Sanussi, the bully who headed the regime’s intelligence, rebels attempted an uprising, but not in sufficient numbers to dislodge the Megraha, one of the last loyal tribes.

But at least for now the Tripolitans are not cheering all that much. In striking contrast to the east, scenes of elation were muted. Girls in pretty dresses and women in black chadors waved to the revolutionaries from the rooftops, egging them on to Colonel Qaddafi’s compound. News of its fall induced a surfeit of celebratory gunfire. For the most part, however, Tripolitans marked the exodus of their leader, after four decades of tyranny, by staying indoors. There were no mass prayers of thanks in Green Square. The Qatari TV station, Al Jazeera, which has acted for much of the uprising as the rebels’ propaganda arm, had shown huge crowds in Benghazi. In Tripoli it made do with close-ups of single flag-wavers.

There were, of course, mitigating circumstances. Power cuts plunged the city into darkness, hampering efforts to reclaim the streets. Rumours spread through town that the colonel had mined Green Square in order to go out with a final bang. And such is the desperate shortage of petrol that only a few cars cruised the town honking their claxons. Random fighting continued in pockets, with loyalist forces dug in around the city’s southern outskirts.

Though relatively few people went out to celebrate, Tripolitans by the hundred plundered the arms depots. No sooner had news of Bab al-Aziziya’s seizure spread, and the faithful broken their fast, than the adventurous headed out to the vast warehouse at the Airport Road base, whose gates the colonel’s men had left open in the final hours of their rule. Dentists jostled with high-school children to haul Kalashnikovs off the shelves. Young teens experimented with newly acquired military knives to relieve bystanders of their wallets. By day, the streets were deserted.

Colonel Qaddafi called his withdrawal tactical. It looked more like a whoosh, particularly given the success of his initial counter-attack. Deprived by NATO of the air power required to control his huge country, he ran out of steam to fight on multiple fronts. Rebel control of the border at Tobruk in the east and Wazin in the Nafusa mountains bordering Tunisia gave the militia unbroken supply lines, while the colonel’s lines began to fragment.

Armed Berbers, apparently equipped by Qatar with sophisticated tank-piercing bullets and backed by special forces from Western powers as well as from Jordan (mysterious English-accented men who strongly resemble special forces have been spotted in the western mountains as well as in Misrata helping to co-ordinate NATO’s bombardment with the rebel advance), swept down from the Nafusa mountains to break through the regime’s defences. Most of the Berbers were amateur fighters, but some had received at least cursory training. Nalut, tucked in the heart of the sun-caked mountains, served as a rear base, recruitment point and training ground for the Berbers and some dissidents from the coast.

Ruses, last stands and victory

The turning-point for Tripoli came on August 21st, when NATO fighter-jets bombarded a base at the eastern edge of Zawiya just as rebels consolidated their control. As loyalist forces fled the base, rebels restocked and chased after them. Simultaneously, loyalist brigades in Colonel Qaddafi’s headquarters at Bab al-Aziziya reportedly abandoned their positions, apparently retreating south to Sebha and Jufra in the Sahara. They may hope to regroup out of rebel reach, import fresh mercenaries from sub-Saharan Africa and perhaps make a last stand. The rebels’ reported capture of two of the colonel’s sons in hindsight may have been a loyalist ruse, to throw the rebellion off the scent while the ruling family planned its getaway.

Rebel fighters converging in armoured cars from Zawiya in the west and Misrata in the east quickly swept through the city from both sides. After a midday NATO bombardment, they punched their way through, meeting so little resistance that they feared at first that they had stumbled into a trap. In the final hours, Tripoli’s population, including many beneficiaries of the colonel’s rule, declared their allegiance to the rebels rather than be caught on the losing side.

Raiding the bases that loyalist brigades had abandoned, armed irregulars sprouted across the city, some sporting walkie-talkies and daubing rebel flags on walls. With remarkably few clashes, each neighbourhood and sometimes each alleyway erected and manned its own barricade. The more sophisticated were assembled from fridges, used missile pods and wrecked cars. Others were school-desks.

A chessboard king eluding checkmate, Colonel Qaddafi has begun retracing the finale of Saddam Hussein, the first of the Arab world’s tyrants to fall to regime change. For nine months the Iraqi leader issued insurgents with their orders from his hiding place, until first his sons and then he himself were hunted down. Though Colonel Qaddafi may seem in hindsight a paper tiger, such is the fear and dissimulation he has injected over four decades of misrule that he continues to cast a long shadow. His fighters fear the consequences of abandoning their posts, and many are still continuing to hold out in isolated places.

Meanwhile, the NTC broadcasts its hopeful pretensions for the future. The radio announcer unveils a vision of equality between men and women, rich and poor, east and west, and other traits of a constitutional Utopia. But as the plume of black smoke lifts from Bab al-Aziziya, tangible signs of leadership are nowhere to be found. The muezzins made a valiant effort to silence the (mainly) celebratory shooting by cautioning against wasting bullets, but to little effect.

The NTC can take some succour from spreading the eastern symbols of the rebellion westward. The rebel tricolour, revived from the Benghazi-based monarchy which predated Colonel Qaddafi, flies at every checkpoint, and someone has renamed a central highway after King Idris. Mustafa Abdel Jalil, the council’s self-effacing leader, seems to enjoy wide acceptance and is credited by some rebels in Tripoli for having given the signal for them to rise up on August 20th. But many still question whether the NTC is up to the challenge.

The NTC’s endorsement of the erroneous reports that the colonel’s sons had been captured damaged its credibility and revealed that it had poor contacts on the ground. With no strong central regime for the time being, western Libya belongs to its self-reliant and armed local fighters who, having won power, may resent the efforts of besuited national councillors to recoup it. Self-reliance, too, will probably bolster clan, tribal and regional coping mechanisms, the very forces the council was formed to quell.

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Guns, not civilian politics, are currently determining Libya’s future, and could yet precipitate a squabble for the country’s tantalisingly rich resources. Most worryingly, Tripoli’s conquest has already exposed divisions between the mountain militia who led the fighting in the west and the civilians who joined in the final days. Some of the fighters from the mountains have remained in place in the capital to continue the offensive and to prevent the colonel carrying out his threat to dispatch thousands of supporters to the city, but some are already abandoning Tripoli in disgust. “Tripolitans are snakes,” says a Berber rebel fighter heading home with a cache of stolen weapons. “We fought for six months in the mountains, while they stayed in Tripoli and partied.” So self-serving are the capital’s people, he declared, that they carry a Qaddafi flag in one pocket and a rebel one in the other.

In Tripoli the cohesion that marked the conquest could unravel. Further complicating the prospects for central control, the police who once instilled terror have melted away. The doors of the prisons, as well as the armouries, have been flung open. Looted weapons and government pickups may keep the more lawless among Tripolitans occupied for some days, but the continued closure of shops, schools and workplaces is unsettling for many. Without a resumption of economic activity, not to say generous and rapid pay rises, people could become restless.

The National Council is hoping to get $2.5 billion from Qatar, perhaps before the end of Ramadan. This would be a start, at least. Despite diplomatic support for the NATO campaign, most Gulf countries remain wary of advertising the benefits of regime change to browbeaten populations. The task of proving that the Arab world without its dictators is a better place may yet be a tortuous struggle.

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Former Libyan Prime Minister: “Gaddafi escaping, dressed as a woman

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GADDAFI (HOLDING CHILD), PASSING REBEL CHECKPOINT DRESSED AS WOMAN

Muammar Qaddafi either in southern Tripoli or fled to desert, says former top
aide

By AFP ROME

Embattled Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi is either in southern Tripoli or has already fled to the desert, his defected former prime minister Abdessalam Jalloud said on Thursday.

“He has only four people left around him. There are two possibilities: either he is hiding in the southern part of Tripoli or he left some time ago,” Jalloud, who fled Tripoli and has been in Italy since Saturday, told a press conference in Rome.

In the first scenario, Qaddafi will remain holed up in the south of Tripoli “until roads reopen and then he will emerge perhaps disguised as a woman or something else to leave” the capital, Jalloud said.

“The second possibility is that he already fled a while ago and is either at the border with Algeria, or in Sirte or Sabha, and he will then cross the desert,” the ex-premier said. Jalloud was Qaddafi’s right-hand man in the 1970s and 1980s but had been increasingly distanced from politics starting in the 1990s following a reported fallout with his childhood friend.

On Sunday he said he believed it was too late for Qaddafi to strike a deal to leave power and he would likely be killed. Jalloud said he has had contacts with the leaders of the National Transitional Council, and had received their approval to encourage Libyans to rebel against Qaddafi and mobilize support abroad. While not part of the NTC, Jalloud said they were “in the same boat” and that he plans to form a secular, liberal, nationalist party.

Jalloud said he tried to escape Libya six times by sea and 12 times by land during recent months. Italian media has speculated he was finally able to get out only with the assistance of foreign diplomats or intelligence agents, or the help of Italian oil company ENI. Jalloud insisted however that he is not beholden to anyone. “I am a free person, completely independent. I don’t owe anything to Italy, or Russia, or France,” he said in response to a question from AFP.

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Libya: The Ruined Revolution

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 by Asad AbuKhalil

This is no revolution. This is not even a popular uprising. This is a ruined revolution. Who but NATO can turn a popular uprising with revolutionary potential into a reactionary political puppet movement headed by former lieutenants of Gaddafi? Who but NATO can smash the concrete revolutionary actions of Arab youths? The dreams of those who expected a real revolutionary moment in which the entire bizarre model of government of Jamahiriyyah were trampled upon by the boots of French and British special forces.

Here was the brave people of Libya acting on their own to throw off the shackles of Gaddafi’s tyranny before sinister forces with colonial nostalgia interfered. There Western forces were the same one totally infatuated with Gaddafi. The “freedom” president, George W. Bush, was paradoxically–the paradox of rhetoric only–the US president who earned the honor of normalizing relations between the Libyan dictator and Western powers. A Saudi prince, the notorious Bandar Bin Sultan, had aided Libya in reaching out to Western countries.

How could this be a revolution when NATO is now in charge?
If Egypt and Tunisia can’t be said to constitute a real “revolution” in a Marxist sense, in which political and social powers are dismantled, the Libyan situation falls far short of such a criterion.

Liberals and conservatives (and former leftists) who utter NATO and “revolution” in the same sentence seem to take little note of this fact. But it is not the first time they come together to bless yet another Western military intervention. Hillary Clinton went–in a matter of weeks really–from meeting with the head of the Libyan secret police, Mu`tasim–one of Gaddafi’s sons, to counting the regime’s the human rights violations, and reminding he world of its brutal nature. Obama did the same. Both flip-flopped because they have utter contempt for their Arab audiences. They really don’t think that Arabs are smart enough to notice or to recall their recent stances from weeks ago, when they embraced the dictator.

The Libyan people deserve congratulations for overthrowing a dictator, but they deserve truthful warnings: that the new Libya may not fulfil the promises of freedom and prosperity. Western oil companies are scrambling to get a foothold in the new Libya, just as they competed to win favor with Qaddafi’s’s regime. The Libyan Transitional Council does not bode well: it is headed by Qaddafi’s Minister of Justice and his second-in-command is the former mentor of none other than Gaddafi’s son Sayf Al-Islam.

The Gaddafi era may have ended, but with NATO in charge, it is likely that the new leader of Libya is another Hamid Karzai or an even more compliant client of Western powers. Mustafa Abd al-Jalil will be the weakest leader of any Middle East country; With NATO in charge, it is certain that Libya won’t be free. For that to happen, the Libyan people have to rise up again, this time against the external forces of colonial powers, and against the reactionary ideologies that the new Libyan government will bring along with it.

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Qatari Youth Opposed to Normalization

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Wikileaks: Fourth Interfaith dialogue: An “Academic” Exercise

REF: 2005 DOHA 1226

 

1. Summary. On April 25-27, Qatar held its Fourth Interfaith Dialogue Conference. Representatives from the main monotheistic religions–Christianity, Islam, and Judaism–attended. This year’s event witnessed notable differences from the previous three conferences. The conference was organized by the College of Shari’a and Islamic Studies at Qatar University; the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs delivered the opening statement; and the number of Jewish and Christian participants was significantly higher than in previous years, while local Qatari participation was minimal. However, these differences failed to produce any meaningful or inspiring outcome but rather contributed to a lackluster conference. End Summary.

 

2. In the weeks leading to the Fourth Conference there was little if any mention of the upcoming event. Unlike last year’s event which witnessed controversy over the invitation and subsequent boycott by Israeli Jews and notable cleric Dr. Yousef al-Qaradawi (reftel), this year’s event had no such flare-up. There was no public debate about the conference, either prior to, during or after.

 

Total Control Or Close To It.

3. Queries to the MFA in the days prior to the conference revealed that the College of Shari’a and Islamic Studies at Qatar University had the lead on the conference rather than the MFA, the usual organizer of international conclaves in Doha. When asked the reason for the shift, officials asserted that having the College in charge of this event was deemed more appropriate. Dr. Aisha Al-Mannai, the dean of the College of Shari’a and Islamic Studies and the coordinator of the conference, said of her role that she had been given full control of the conference and a free hand in inviting Muslim and Christian participants in coordination with the MFA. However, the MFA was responsible for inviting the Jewish participants.

 

More Talk, Less Debate

4. This year, the Amir did not deliver the opening remarks and was conspicuously absent from the conference. Instead, the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Ahmed Bin Abdulla Al-Mahmoud, officiated at the opening ceremony. In his opening remarks, Al-Mahmoud welcomed the participants and expressed his hopes that the conference would be a vehicle for promoting mutual understanding and cooperation among the faiths. Al-Mahmoud also reproached those who insulted religious figures, stating that such offenses were unacceptable, unjustifiable and discriminatory, and called on participants to explore the best means of implementing recommendations from last year’s conference.

 

5. The conference covered the role of religion in civil rights, education, enhancing moral values, environment, freedom of expression, gender equality, globalization, peacemaking, pluralism, and scientific developments. At times the presentations remained on a purely scholarly level. One notable exception was the presentation by Jacob Bender, an American Jew who is currently making a documentary that explores a “dialogue of civilizations” and interfaith relations through the achievements of a Muslim, Jew and Christian during the Middle Ages. His talk sparked great interest among participants in his film as an educational tool for promoting religious toleration and interaith understanding.

 

Higher Numbers and New Faces

 

6. Participation in this year’s conference rose significantly in comparison to last year. There was a total of 131 participants this year as opposed to 82 last year. Although Muslims figured largely, 37 Christians and 14 Jews participated. According to Al-Mannai, speaking and moderating roles were equally divided among the representatives of the three faiths. This year also witnessed the participation of Iranians for the first time. Both Sheikh Mohamed Ali Al-Taskheri, general secretary of the World Forum for Proximity of Islamic School of Thoughts, and Siboh Sarkis Sian, a bishop of the Armenian Orthodox Church, participated and spoke about the role of religion in globalization and civil rights.

 

Qataris Still Adjusting to Jewish Participation

 

7. Relatively speaking, the participation of Jews in the conference remained a sensitive issue this year. Jews from the U.S., Europe and Israel participated in the conference. According to Al-Mannai, the relative large number of Jewish participants raised protest among some Qatari invitees and led to their refusal to participate in the conference. Except for a few faculty members from the College of Shari’a and Islamic Studies who were attended, Qataris were largely and visibly absent from the conference. Notably absent also was cleric Dr. Yousef al-Qaradawi, who was not invited because of his position on Jewish participation in the previous year’s conference. In his Friday sermon the day after the conference concluded, al-Qaradawi made no mention of the conference. Al-Mannai emphasized that individuals declined to participate not because they are against the Jewish faith, but because of Israeli policies–a sentiment also reiterated by a MFA official. According to the official, local Qatari participation in the Dialogue had decreased due in large part to reservations about the participation of Israeli rabbis. The official stressed that the reservation was not religious in nature, but rather political-i.e., an outward display of support for the Palestinians.

 

8. Local concerns about Jewish participation however, did not seem to trickle down to other participants at the conference. Muslim and Jewish participants could be readily seen interacting closely together and engaging in deep conversation throughout the conference. Perhaps in this one aspect, the conference appeared successful-facilitating genuine one-on-one dialogue between participants of all faiths.

 

Conclusion

9. The Fourth Interfaith Dialogue Conference issued various statements and recommendations at its conclusion. There was a recommendation to form a follow-up committee to work on establishing a center for religious dialogue in Qatar, a proposal advanced by the Amir at last year’s conference. Participants also called for the expansion of the dialogue to include non-monotheistic religions. Another proposal was directed at the UN, calling for a resolution making it illegal to insult religions and religious symbols. Other more general and intangible statements focused on the importance of education and culture and the arts in promoting religious understanding, the re-affirmation of right of individuals to choose their own religions, equality between the sexes, and the family unit as the basis of human society.

 

Comment

10. A larger participation notwithstanding, this year’s conference did little to advance any real or substantive dialogue between the religions.Discussion was for the most part stale and remained on a superficial level. The fear of offending any one religion or creating controversy appeared to have obviated any critical discussion. Even the more interesting and thought provoking presentations were quickly forgotten as moderators regulated audience comments, making any real debate impossible. Having said that, Qatar should still be commended for doing what no one else in the region appears willing to do: bringing representatives of the three religions together to engage in dialogue.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Protesters stand silently during the demonstration holding their placards and signs. — The “Jews Say No” movement held a protest in Upper Manhattan expressing their opposition to the recent air attacks on the Gaza strip. Protesters stood silently, holding posters and placards which voiced their concerns. New York, USA. 22nd August 2011

 

 

 

 

 

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Shame and Disgrace Zionist Akram: At the service of the Zionist hoodlums at the Times

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Look at this classic racist language of the Times.  And notice that, typically, the native token Arab writer at the paper, had to be held by the hand by the master Zionist (Ethan Bronner, who “contributed” reporting).

And notice that the article humanizes Zionism “victims” and talks about a baby, while it only focuses on victims who–according to Zionist Fares Akram–were terrorists.  Fares Arkam is building a resume of shame and disgrace.

Israeli Strikes in Retaliation Kill 9 Gazans

By FARES AKRAM
Published: August 25, 2011

GAZA — Nine Gazans have been killed in Israeli strikes since Wednesday night, with Israel’s southern communities withstanding 20 rockets from Gaza over the same 24-hour period.

Warning sirens repeatedly sent Israelis across the south into bomb shelters, but most of the rockets landed in empty fields near the Israeli cities of Ofakim, Ashkelon and Beersheba. However, a 9-month-old baby was slightly hurt in Ashkelon when a car was hit with shrapnel.

The recent round of violence started a week ago, with a terrorist attack ?  on southern Israel in which eight Israelis were killed. Israeli forces pursuing suspects killed three Egyptian security offirs in the Egyptian Sinai, creating a furor with Egypt.

Israeli officials said the perpetrators and planners of the terrorist attack were originally from Gaza, and Israel has retaliated with strikes that have killed at least 23 Palestinians. Gazan officials say they know nothing about the source of the attack.

Israel’s first retaliatory strike in Gaza killed leaders of the Popular Resistance Committees, a pro-Hamas group that Israel said was behind the terrorist attack. On Wednesday, an airstrike killed an Islamic Jihad leader, Ismail al-Asmar, 34; the group said Thursday that it had fired several of the missiles at Israel in retaliation.

Early Thursday, Israelis struck a smuggling tunnel that crossed under Gaza’s southern border with Egypt, killing four.

A third airstrike — on a club that the Israeli military said held weapons — killed two people in northern Gaza: a member of Islamic Jihad and a Palestinian man who later died.

A Palestinian medical spokesman said 29 Palestinians were wounded in those three assaults.

Thursday evening, as Gazans began to break their Ramadan fasts, an Israeli plane fired a missile at a motorbike in northern Gaza, killing two Palestinian militants, witnesses and medical sources said. The Israeli military said that the two had fired a mortar shell at the Erez crossing.

CAN DISGRACE  ZIONIST AKRAM SEE THE NAZI HOLOCAUST IN GAZA


Collective Punishment, a warcrime. What did this baby child do? Imagine… this would be YOUR child….
A Palestinian man carries the body of Islam Greagea, a two-year-old boy killed in an Israeli air strike, at a hospital in Gaza City on August 19, 2011
The body of a Palestinian child lies at a morgue in Shifa Hospital after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City August 19, 2011.
This is the unsouled little body of exactly 2 year old Islam. For which crime did he die? The world, never aware of the over 77 massacres on Palestine since 1948, has turned a blind eye, also to Gaza, and only speaking of a siege, totally ignoring the reality Gaza has turned into a death-camp. May little Shaheed Islam rest in peace, peace which he never knew in this world. Ameen.
Gaza – Aug 19, 2011
Gaza, child martyr. Aug 19, 2011
2 year old (Shaheed) Islam Greagea before he got hit by indiscriminate Israeli bombshells
Gaza medic Adham AbuSamliah:”Israel is using weapons for the first time… difficult to identify bodies and burned flesh of human beings…” So how long is the world going to stay in silence?
Palestinian doctors stand near the body of a man killed in an Israeli air strike, at a hospital in Gaza City on August 19, 2011.
Gaza, August 19, 2011
Palestinians helped carry the wounded into Al-Shifa hospital after an Israeli air strike. Fighter jets bombed Gaza overnight, killing a teenager and injuring five others, Palestinian medical sources said. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Gaza, another child martyr. Aug 19, 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Wounded children in the hospital in Gaza, Aug 19, 2011
Gaza, Aug 19, 2011
Gaza, Aug 19, 2011
Gaza, Aug 19, 2011
A Palestinian man looks at the body of a girl at a morgue in Shifa Hospital after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City August 19, 2011
Gaza, Aug 19, 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinian doctors tend to the injured at Al-Shifa hospital after an overnight Israeli air strike in Gaza City killed a teenager and injured five others. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinians carry a wounded boy into Al-Shifa hospital following an Israeli air raid on Gaza City. — Palestinians helped carry the wounded into Al-Shifa hospital after an Israeli air strike. Fighter jets bombed Gaza overnight, killing a teenager and injuring five others, Palestinian medical sources said. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Palestinians carry a wounded woman into Al-Shifa hospital following an Israeli air raid on Gaza City. — Palestinians helped carry the wounded into Al-Shifa hospital after an Israeli air strike. Fighter jets bombed Gaza overnight, killing a teenager and injuring five others, Palestinian medical sources said. Palestinian Territory. 19th August 2011
Wounded Palestinian men wait for treatment at Shifa hospital in Gaza City, early Friday, Aug. 19, 2011. Three blasts shook Gaza early Friday, including one that killed a 13-year-old boy, according to a Gaza hospital official. But the Israeli military did not immediately confirm reports of three more airstrikes targeting a security compound, a home and the area of the smuggling tunnels crisscrossing the Gaza-Egypt border. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
A wounded Palestinian man waits for treatment at Shifa hospital in Gaza City, early Friday, Aug. 19, 2011. Three blasts shook Gaza early Friday, including one that killed a 13-year-old boy, according to a Gaza hospital official. But the Israeli military did not immediately confirm reports of three more airstrikes targeting a security compound, a home and the area of the smuggling tunnels crisscrossing the Gaza-Egypt border. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)


A Hamas policeman walks past a damaged government building after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Palestinian men inspect the damage at the scene of an overnight Israeli air raid on Gaza City on August 19, 2011. Israeli fighter jets bombed Gaza, killing a teenager and injuring five people, in retaliation to a series of coordinated attacks on August 18 near the southern Israeli sea resort of Eilat left eight dead. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian woman collects her belongings from a damaged bedroom after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A Palestinian man surveys the damage of his house after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
A Palestinian boy sits inside a car destoyed in an overnight Israeli air raid on Gaza City on August 19, 2011. Israeli fighter jets bombed Gaza, killing a teenager and injuring five people, in retaliation to a series of coordinated attacks on August 18 near the southern Israeli sea resort of Eilat left eight dead. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian man surveys the damage in Bin Zayed mosque after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
A Palestinian man surveys the damage in Bin Zayed mosque after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
A Palestinian man prays inside the damaged Bin Zayed mosque after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
A Palestinian man inspects the shattered window frames of a mosque damaged in overnight Israeli air raids on Gaza City on August 19, 2011. Israeli fighter jets bombed Gaza, killing a teenager and injuring five people, in retaliation to a series of coordinated attacks on August 18 near the southern Israeli sea resort of Eilat left eight dead. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinians stand over a destroyed house after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
A Palestinian man sits on rubbles of a destroyed house after an Israeli air strike in Gaza August 19, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck Hamas security installations in Gaza on Friday, killing at least one Palestinian, in further retaliation for attacks along the Egyptian border in which eight Israelis died. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem (GAZA – Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
A Palestinian retrieves remains of a munition, said to have been fired by an Israeli helicopter, after it landed in the Mediterranean Sea off the shore of Shati refugee camp in Gaza City, Friday, Aug. 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
Israeli helicopter, after it landed in the Mediterranean Sea off the shore of Shati refugee camp in Gaza City, Friday, Aug. 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
Palestinians mourn over the body of 13-year-old boy Mahmoud Abu Samrah during his funeral in Gaza City August 19, 2011. Reuters journalists on Friday saw eight bodies in a Gaza morgue. Medical officials said Abu Samrah was among the dead and that at least 18 people were wounded in Israeli strikes. ( REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa )
Palestinian mourners carry the body of Mahmoud Abu Samra, 13, killed in an Israeli airstrike early Friday, during his funeral in Gaza City, Aug. 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
Palestinian mourners carry the body of Mahmoud Abu Samra, 13, killed in an Israeli airstrike early Friday, during his funeral in Gaza City, Aug. 19, 2011.. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
Aug 20, 2011
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Gaza – Aug 20, 2011
Palestinian relatives mourn over the body of two-year-old Malek Shaat during his funeral in the Rafah refugee camp, southern Gaza Strip, on August 19, 2011. . Photo by MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
RAFAH, GAZA – AUGUST 19: Palestinians attend the funerals of six people including PRC secretary-general Kamal al-Neyrab who were killed in an Israeli airstrike on August 19, 2011 in Rafah, Gaza. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
RAFAH, GAZA – AUGUST 19: A Palestinian man attends the funerals of six people including PRC secretary-general Kamal al-Neyrab who were killed in an Israeli airstrike on August 19, 2011 in Rafah, Gaza. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Palestinian relatives carry the body of two-year-old Malek Shaat during his funeral in the Rafah refugee camp, southern Gaza Strip, on August 19, 2011. (Photo credit MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian man carries the body of two-year-old boy Malek Sha’at during his funeral in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 19, 2011. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem
A Palestinian man carries the body of two-year-old boy Malek Sha’at during his funeral in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 19, 2011
A Palestinian mourner carries the body of two-year-old Malek Shaat, who they say was killed in an Israeli airstrike Thursday, during his funeral in Rafah in the southern Gaza, Friday, Aug. 19, 2011. .(AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)
Palestinian relatives of Khaled Sha’at, a member of an armed Palestinian faction, and his two-year-old son Malek mourn during their funeral in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 19, 2011. . REUTERS/Suhaib Salem
A Palestinian woman mourns over the body of 13-year-old boy Mahmoud Abu Samrah during his funeral in Gaza City August 19, 2011. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinians gather around the body of Mahmoud Abu Samra, 13, killed in an Israeli airstrike early Friday, at his family house during his funeral in Gaza City, Aug. 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
RAFAH, GAZA – AUGUST 19: Palestinians carry a body as they attend the funerals of six people including PRC secretary-general Kamal al-Neyrab who were killed in an Israeli airstrike on August 19, 2011 in Rafah, Gaza. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
RAFAH, GAZA – AUGUST 19: Palestinians attend the funerals of six people including PRC secretary-general Kamal al-Neyrab who were killed in an Israeli airstrike on August 19, 2011 in Rafah, Gaza. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Palestinian mourners carry the bodies of four of the five Popular Resistance Committee militants killed in Israeli air strikes during their funeral in the Rafah refugee camp, southern Gaza Strip, Friday, Aug. 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)
A Palestinian man carries the body of two-year-old boy Islam Qreqa during a funeral in Gaza City August 20, 2011. Palestinians said at least nine militants have died in multiple Israeli strikes, as well as two children, one of them Islam Qreqa. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem
Palestinian mourners carry the coffins of Moataz Qouriqa, a commander of Islamic Jihad’s Al-Quds Brigade, and his brother during their funeral in Gaza City on August 20, 2011 (Photo credit should read MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian man carries the body of two-year-old boy Islam Qreqa during a funeral in Gaza City August 20, 2011. Palestinians said at least nine resistance fighters have died in multiple Israeli strikes, including two children, one of them Islam Qreqa. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem
Palestinian mourners carry the coffins of Moataz Qouriqa, a commander of Islamic Jihad’s Al-Quds Brigade, and his brother Munzer during their funeral in Gaza City on August 20, 2011 (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Gaza – Aug 20, 2011
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Doctor Shaheed Dr. Monther Gregea killed by zionist Occupation in Gaza – Aug 20, 2011
Doctor Shaheed Dr. Monther Gregea when still alive
Gaza – Aug 20, 2011
Palestinians survey the damage after an Israeli air strike in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip August 20, 2011. ~ REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinians survey the damage after an Israeli air strike in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip August 20, 2011. Israeli aircraft struck a resistance outposts in Gaza and Palestinian Resistance fired rockets back on Friday following deadly gun attacks along the desert border with Egypt that have raised tensions between Israel and the new rulers in Cairo. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
A Palestinian man carries the body of two-year-old boy Islam Qreqa during a funeral in Gaza City August 20, 2011. Palestinians said at least nine resistance fighters have died in multiple Israeli strikes, including two children, one of them Islam Qreqa. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem
Palestinians mourn over the bodies of Moataz Qouriqa, a commander of Islamic Jihad’s Al-Quds Brigade, his five-year-old son Islam and his brother Munzer during their funeral in Gaza City on August 20, 2011 after all three were killed when Israeli planes launched air strikes in Gaza in retaliation for suspected Islamist militants killing eight Israelis near the Egyptian border. (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinians carry the body of Monther Qreqa during his funeral in Gaza City August 20, 2011. Palestinians said at least nine resistance fighters have died in multiple Israeli strikes, as well as two children, one aged two. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem
Palestinian mourners carry the coffins of Moataz Qouriqa, a commander of Islamic Jihad’s Al-Quds Brigade, and his brother during their funeral in Gaza City on August 20, 2011 after Israeli planes launched air strikes in Gaza in retaliation for suspects (!) killing eight Israelis near the Egyptian border. (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinians mourn over the bodies of Moataz Qouriqa, a commander of Islamic Jihad’s Al-Quds Brigade, his five-year-old son Islam and his brother Munzer during their funeral in Gaza City on August 20, 2011 after all three were killed when Israeli planes launched air strikes in Gaza in retaliation for suspects (!) killing eight Israelis near the Egyptian border. (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Gaza, Aug 20, 2011
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Al-Shifa hospital this afternoon. Man injured in one of the Israeli attacks earlier today on Gaza | Aug 20, 2011
Gaza – Aug 20, 2011
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Smoke rises following an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2011.
Hamas security men inspect the damage at a Hamas training camp following an Israeli air-strike in Gaza City. Aug 21, 2011
RAFAH, GAZA – AUGUST 21: A young boy plays with a Palestinian flag in a street in Rafah near to the Egyptian border on August 21, 2011
RAFAH, GAZA – AUGUST 21: A young boy plays with a Palestinian flag in a street in Rafah near to the Egyptian border on August 21, 2011
Palestinians inspect the wreckage of a car after it was hit by an Israeli missile strike in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2011. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)
Gaza, Aug 21, 2011
A member of the Hamas security forces gestures in front of a car damaged after an explosion in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 24, 2011. A member of the resistance group Islamic Jihad was killed in a car explosion in the Gaza Strip on Wednesday that Palestinians said was the result of an Israeli air strike. REUTERS/ Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinians check the damage to a car after an explosion in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 24, 2011. A member of the Resistance group Islamic Jihad was killed in a car explosion in the Gaza Strip on Wednesday that Palestinians said was the result of an Israeli air strike. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Palestinians look at the wreckage of a car after it was hit by an Israeli missile, killing an Islamic Jihad resistance fighter in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.
Palestinians look at the wreckage of a car after it was hit by an Israeli missile strike killing an Islamic Jihad Resistance fighter in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011
Palestinians check the damage to a car after an explosion in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 24, 2011.
Palestinians look at the wreckage of a car after it was hit by an Israeli missile, killing an Islamic Jihad Resistance fighter in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011
A Palestinian man mourns over the body of an Islamic Jihad Resistance fighter, Shaheed Ismail Al Asmar, 34 years old, at a hospital after a car explosion in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 24, 2011.
Palestinian medics examine the body of Shaheed Ismael al-Ismar, 34, at Al-Najar hospital in Rafah, on August 24, 2011, after he was killed in an Israeli air strike in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, scarcely 48 hours after militant factions had agreed to a temporary ceasefire — on condition Israel also stopped its air strikes.
Palestinian medics treat seriously wounded Islamic Jihad Resistance fighter, Shaheed Ismail Al Asmar, who later died of wounds sustained in an Israeli air strike on his car in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.
Palestinian relatives and friends stand next to the body of Ismail Al Asmar during his funeral. — Palestinian relatives of Islamic Jihad Resistance fighter Ismail Al Asmar, who was killed during an Israeli air strike, pay their respects in a mosque during his funeral in Rafah City, southern Gaza Strip. 24th August 2011
Palestinians gather around a damaged motorcycle following an Israeli air strike that wounded two Islamic Jihad resistance fighters in Deir Al Balah, central Gaza strip, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011
Palestinian relatives and friends stand next to the body of Ismail Al Asmar during his funeral. — Palestinian relatives of Islamic Jihad resistance fighter Ismail Al Asmar, who was killed during an Israeli air strike, pay their respects in a mosque during his funeral in Rafah City, southern Gaza Strip. 24th August 2011
A Palestinian relative places his head next to of Islamic Jihad resistance fighter Ismail Al Asmar during his funeral. — Palestinian relatives of Islamic Jihad militant Ismail Al Asmar, who was killed during an Israeli air strike, pay their respects in a mosque during his funeral in Rafah City, southern Gaza Strip. 24th August 2011
Relatives of Palestinian resistance fighter Ismail Al-Asmar mourn during his funeral in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip August 24, 2011. Israeli air strikes killed Al-Asmar, the local commander of the Islamic Jihad militant group in the Gaza Strip on Wednesday and wounded two resistance fighters who launched rockets at Israel, despite a two-day-old truce, Israeli and Palestinian officials said. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011
Palestinian relatives and friends stand next to the body of Ismail Al Asmar during his funeral. Gaza, Aug 24, 2011
Palestinians carry the body of Islamic Jihad resistance fighter Ismael Al Asmar, killed in an Israeli air strike on his car, during his funeral in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.
Palestinians carry the body of Islamic Jihad resistance fighter Ismael Al Asmar, killed in an Israeli air strike on his car, during his funeral in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.
Palestinians carry the body of Islamic Jihad resistance fighter Ismael Al Asmar, killed in an Israeli air strike on his car, during his funeral in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.
Palestinians carry the body of Islamic Jihad resistance fighter Ismael Al Asmar, killed in an Israeli air strike on his car, during his funeral in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.
Gaza | August 25, 2011
The body of Palestinian boy Salama Al Masri is displayed at the mortuary of Kamal Adwan Hospital. — The body of Palestinian boy Salama Al Masri lies in the mortuary of Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia in the northern Gaza Strip after an Israeli air strike. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A man is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A boy is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A man is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
The body of Palestinian boy Salama Al Masri is displayed at the mortuary of Kamal Adwan Hospital. — The body of Palestinian boy Salama Al Masri lies in the mortuary of Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia in the northern Gaza Strip after an Israeli air strike. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A woman is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A child is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A man is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
People seen here as they inspect the site of an Israeli air-strike which hit a sports club in the Gaza strip. — Palestinians inspect a sports club in Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip after attacks by Israeli warplanes on which led to a number of injuries and the death of at least one Palestinian. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A child is given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital following an Israeli air-strike on the Gaza strip. — Men, women and children were all given medical care at Kamal Adwan Hospital in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip after Israeli aircraft launched a series of attacks. Medical sources reported twenty injured. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
People seen here as they inspect the site of an Israeli air-strike which hit a sports club in the Gaza strip. — Palestinians inspect a sports club in Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip after attacks by Israeli warplanes on which led to a number of injuries and the death of at least one Palestinian. Palestinian Territory. 25th August 2011
A wounded Palestinian man receives treatment at the Kama Edwan hospital in Beit Lahia on August 25, 2011. An Israeli air strike killed a Palestinian and wounded 15 others in the northern Gaza Strip, Palestinian medical sources said. AFP PHOTO/MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
A man sheds tears beside the body of Salama al Masri, 19, at the morgue of the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip, early Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. According to Palestinian doctors, al Masri died from wounds after an Israeli strike on an Islamic Jihad club. The Israeli military said its aircraft hit a weapons storage facility and smuggling tunnels under the Gaza-Egypt border, retaliation for Wednesday’s rocket fire. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)
Palestinians wheel a wounded man following an Israeli attack Gaza City on August 25, 2011. (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Wounded Palestinian men receive medical care at the al-Najar Hospital in Rafah town in the southern Gaza Strip, on August 25, 2011. Five were wounded after Israeli warplanes staged attacks on a tunnel between the southern Gaza Strip and Egypt, a Palestinian medical source and witnesses said . AFP PHOTO / SAID KHATIB (Photo credit should read SAID KHATIB/AFP/Getty Images)
Wounded Palestinian men receive medical care at the al-Najar Hospital in Rafah town in the southern Gaza Strip, on August 25, 2011, five wounded after Israeli warplanes staged attacks on a tunnel between the southern Gaza Strip and Egypt, a Palestinian medical source and witnesses said . (Photo credit SAID KHATIB/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinians doctors attend a wounded man at the Al Najar hospital following an Israeli air strike on a smuggling tunnel in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. . (AP Photo/Eyad Baba)
Palestinians wheel a wounded man following an Israeli attack Gaza City on August 25, 2011. (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinians bring a wounded man to the treatment room of Al Najar hospital following an Israeli air strike on a smuggling tunnel in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Eyad Baba)
A Palestinian man carries his wounded son to receive treatment at Kama Edwan Hospital in Beit Lahia on August 25, 2011. An Israeli air strike killed a Palestinian and wounded 15 others in the northern Gaza Strip, Palestinian medical sources said. (Photo credit MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
Palestinians carry the wounded into the al-Najar hospital in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, on August 25, 2011. Five were wounded after Israeli warplanes staged attacks on a tunnel between the southern Gaza Strip and Egypt, a Palestinian medical source and witnesses said . (Photo credit SAID KHATIB/AFP/Getty Images)
Wounded Palestinian men receive medical care at the al-Najar Hospital in Rafah town in the southern Gaza Strip, on August 25, 2011, five wounded after Israeli warplanes staged attacks on a tunnel between the southern Gaza Strip and Egypt, a Palestinian medical source and witnesses said . (Photo credit SAID KHATIB/AFP/Getty Images)
The body of Islamic Jihad militant Attiya Moqat lies in the mortuary of Al-Shifa hospital after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City on August 24, 2011. (Photo credit MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images)
A wounded Palestinian man is carried to the al-Najar Hospital in Rafah town in the southern Gaza Strip, on August 25, 2011. Five were wounded after Israeli warplanes staged attacks on a tunnel between the southern Gaza Strip and Egypt, a Palestinian medical source and witnesses said . (Photo credit SAID KHATIB/AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian man reacts at a hospital upon the arrival of the body of a militant killed in an Israeli air strike in Gaza City August 24, 2011.
Palestinians wheel the wounded into the al-Najar hospital in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, on August 25, 2011.
Palestinians wheel the wounded into the al-Najar hospital in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah, on August 25, 2011.

How many more dead corpses of Palestine’s Children does the international community need to see in order to act?


Posted in GazaComments Off on Shame and Disgrace Zionist Akram: At the service of the Zionist hoodlums at the Times

A Pen of Damascus Steel

NOVANEWS

 

Political Cartoons of an Arab Master

Ali Farzat*

This is the book by the brilliant Syrian cartoonist, Ali Farzat, who was severely beaten up by armed goons of the Syrian regime yesterday.

 [An Arabic / English Edition]

We are deeply saddened by the recent attack on Ali Farzat that has left him in the hospital with mangled hands and other wounds. Early Thursday morning, as he left his studio on Pakistan Street in downtown Damascus after a night’s work . . . he was forced into an suv by men with guns who drove him into the desolate land in the direction of the airport, beat him, and pushed him from the vehicle.

We ask humanitarians within Syria and around the world to use this moment to restore sanity and dialogue to Syria and to the world . . . as we have oft been encouraged to do by this fearless man with a pen.

Farzat’s caricatures are widely published in Europe and across the Arab world. Farzat is head of the Arab Cartoonists’ Union and has received the distinguished Prince Claus award (Holland).

Ali Farzat is the Shakespeare of Arab political cartoonists. A man who speaks “truth to power,” Farzat has had his share of harassment, threats, and indignities at the hands of public officials. Farzat’s favorite target is government bureaucrats. His caricatures give hope to the disenfranchised, the poor, and the hungry. Farzat is an authentic Arab voice. And yet he does not hesitate to buck the tide of opinion in the Arab world. (He consistently disparaged Saddam Hussein, for example, prior to the US invasion of Iraq.)

Farzat’s work is a cry for justice that cuts across all cultures.

 

* Ali Farzat is the dean of Arab political cartoonists. His caricatures do not spare wealth, influence, or power. They give hope to the disenfranchised, the poor, and the hungry. Farzat is an authentic Arab voice who nevertheless does not hesitate to buck the tide of majority opinion. (He has consistently disparaged Saddam Hussein, for example, and lauds the US for adopting his position that Saddam must go.)

His work has appeared for thirty-five years in major Arab daily newspapers as well as in Le Monde and other international publications. Farzat has served as the head of the Society of Arab Cartoonists since 1980 and has won many awards, including the prestigious Prince Claus Award in 2002.

Farzat is Shakespearean in his productivity. He has created more than 15,000 caricatures. He is now in his fifties and lives in Damascus with his wife and family.

Posted in SyriaComments Off on A Pen of Damascus Steel

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