Archive | January, 2012

Zio-Nazi Racism Against Non Jews Especially Africans

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by Laura Stuart

Report for the African Refugee Development Center (ARDC) to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) – submitted January 30, 2012

The State of Israel, which demands that non Jews will recognise it as “The Jewish State” has been involved in the ethnic cleansing of non Jews i.e. Palestine Christian and Muslim Arabs since its creation. Whilst the Israeli Government passes more and more laws which disadvantage non Jews, less well known is the situation of immigrants and asylum seekers from Africa. This video by the African Refugee Development Center is being presented to the United Nations today. The video explains in detail the basis for the racism of Israelis against non Jews.

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MK Eichler–IsraHell media is ‘anti-Semitic’

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MK Yisrael Eichler accuses media of using Nazi tactics to turn public against ultra-Orthodox sector

ed note–where do we even begin with something as insane as this?

Well, I guess the thing to note from this is that Jewish interests will use the ‘anti-Semite’ thing against ANYONE, even their own, and even when there is no ‘logical’ position from which to do it. The 2nd thing to note is the TYPICAL maneuver here–In this case, the haredim in Israel have painted themselves as the dictionary picture of obnoxious, unruly headcases, and yet, rather than do some sort of examination of conscience in deciding if there is the slightest possibility that their own behavior has played a part in the troubles existing, they AUTOMATICALLY throw it on ‘the other guy’, in this case, the more left-leaning Jews.

At the end of the exercise however, the one thing that all can take away from this spectacle is something which we say here often–which is that Jewish thinking is a mental disorder that births all sorts of secondary afflictions as well and it is no wonder these people have been driven out of every sane country which they have ever inhabited.

ynet

MK Yisrael Eichler (United Torah Judaism) accused the media on Monday of turning the Israeli public against the ultra-Orthodox sector by publishing “anti-Semitic talkbacks and incitement.”

Speaking before the Knesset plenum, Eichler likened the media’s conduct to that of the Weimar Republic, referring to the early Nazi regime in Germany. 

The remarks were made during a sparsely attended Knesset session discussing a series nonconfidence votes, brought forth by the Kadima, Labor, Meretz, Balad, Hadash and United Arab List-Ta’al factions. The criticism was primarily directed at Housing and Construction Minister Ariel Atias’ proposed criteria for affordable housing eligibility, which some politicians claim favors the haredi sector. 

Earlier Monday, the Israel Land administration unanimously approved the proposed regulations, which grant priority housing to those who have served in the army but do not favor households where both partners work.

The parties blasted Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government for “violating the middle class’ basic right for … affordable housing.”

‘Shas cares for the weak’

The housing and construction minister deflected the criticism Monday, blaming his predecessors for failing to reform the eligibility criteria.

“We fought to reduce the price of land by 50%,” Atias argued. “We fought for the young couples. We aspired to make sure that the criteria benefit the widest cross-section of the Israeli population.”

Atias stressed that his party, Shas, does not represent any particular sector. “Shas is the only party that cares for the weak,” he said.

Atias also denied the claims that the new affordable housing standard favors haredi families because it prioritizes couples who have been married for years over newlyweds.

Interior Minister Eli Yishai addressed in his speech the housing shortage within the Arab sector, saying that the State must begin to “build upwards” to solve the problem.

“I don’t see it as a cultural issue,” Yishai said during the session. “Tall buildings are present across the Arab sector. When there is no space and the population grows, building upwards is necessary.”

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Defeat of the Champion

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Defeat of the Champion (25 minutes/2011/UK/Dir: Ken Fero & Tariq Mehmood/Migrant Media)

In Birmingham in 2010 the police covertly erected 200 CCTV cameras for ‘Project Champion’ – an anti-terrorist initiative targeting Muslims – which incensed members of the communities it was ring fencing. This documentary is the story of how Project Champion was successfully opposed by community and civil rights activists.

Reaction to the film:

bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-15087164

itv.com/central-west/human-rights-film12199/

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Anti-Assad terrorists blow up gas pipeline near Lebanon border

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Haaretz

An “armed terrorist group” in Syria blew up a gas pipeline at dawn Monday, the state-run media said, as activists reported gunfire and explosions in the suburbs of Damascus as the country’s conflict moves ever closer to the capital.

The pipeline carries gas from the central province of Homs to an area near the border with Lebanon. SANA news agency reported that the blast happened in Tal Hosh, which is about five miles (eight kilometers) from Talkalakh, along the border with Lebanon.

Further details were not immediately released.

There have been several pipeline attacks since the Syrian uprising began in mid-March, but it is not clear who is behind them.

President Bashar Assad’s regime has blamed “terrorists” for driving the country’s 10-month-old uprising, not protesters seeking democratic change.

On Sunday, Syrian troops in dozens of tanks and armored vehicles stormed rebellious areas near the capital, shelling neighborhoods that have fallen under the control of army dissidents and clashing with fighters.

Activists and residents said at least 62 people were killed in violence nationwide.

The large-scale Sunday offensive suggested the regime is worried that military defectors could close in on Damascus, the seat of Assad’s power. Early Monday, activists reported hearing gunfire and blasts in the Damascus suburbs, but there were no details.

The rising bloodshed added urgency to Arab and Western diplomatic efforts to end the 10-month conflict.

In the past two weeks, army dissidents have become more visible near the capital, seizing several suburbs on the eastern edge of Damascus and setting up checkpoints where masked men wearing military attire and wielding assault rifles stop motorists and protect anti-regime protests.

Their presence so close to the capital is astonishing in tightly controlled Syria and suggests the Assad regime may either be losing control or setting up a trap for the fighters before going on the offensive.

The uprising against Assad, which began with largely peaceful demonstrations, has grown increasingly militarized recently as more frustrated protesters and army defectors have taken up arms.

In a bid to stamp out resistance in the capital’soutskirts, the military has responded with a withering assault on a string of suburbs, leading to a spike in violence that has killed at least 150 people since Thursday.

The United Nations says at least 5,400 people have been killed in the 10 months of violence.

The UN is holding talks on a new resolution on Syria and next week will discuss an Arab League peace plan aimed at ending the crisis. But the initiatives face two major obstacles: Damascus’ rejection of the Arab plan that it says impinges on its sovereignty, and Russia’s willingness to use its UN Security Council veto to protect Syria from sanctions.

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The Maspero Sit In

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The amber streetlights standing sentry over the Nile Cornice running in front of the communications building in the Maspero complex in downtown Cairo do something odd to peoples’ coloration at night, flattening and softening bright colors, turning the assemblages of people into a chiaroscuro – here and there a green laser lacing through the smoke and smog to mark out one of the snipers perched in the windows of the hulking rotunda.

The building is studded with huge communications antennae on top. It is from there that the government puts out its propaganda, and for that reason it has been targeted by protesters, who started a sit-in there on January 26. I spent the evenings of the 26th and the 27th there.

Tahrir is vast, central, telegenic, and symbolically important. But it has also taken on too festive an air, activists tell me. There have been mild clashes between revolutionaries and activists, insistent that the fight for freedom in Egypt has scarcely begun, and those who are eager to settle into the parliament and institutionalize their electoral gains: the Freedom and Justice Party of the Muslim Brotherhood and Al Nour, the Salafi Party.

They both did well, far better than activists expected in the last election. But their strength is overstated, and will be evanescent. They have no social program except their welfare networks, and for Egypt’s teeming poor, that won’t be enough. The question isn’t political Islam. It’s political economy. I spoke for a while with one man during the sit-in about this. After telling me about regime propaganda against the panoply of ideologically hard-left protesters – the Revolutionary Socialists, with their yellow first clenched in the midst of a red flag, the anarchists, the libertarian socialists, and others – I asked him if he was affiliated with any of those tendencies. No, he told me, he just liked some of their ideas, and it was too bad that the regime was so intent on demonizing them through the information blitz from the Maspero. Then I asked him if he had participated in the last round of elections. Yes, he told me, he had voted for the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi.

“But they are terrible, I voted for them, but now I oppose them.” This puzzled me, so I asked him to expand. He said: “FJP and Al Nour fielded the best candidates in my neighborhood, so I voted for them, but now I oppose them, and the struggle continues.” The left did not have a unified position on boycotting the elections in Egypt, and amidst strategic disarray and the welter of choices, many simply did as he did: voted for the best candidate and moved on to the street and the struggle. I also asked him why he chose not to work with any of the leftist tendencies. He responded speaking specifically about the Revolutionary Socialists that “they sometimes speak in a very complex way, which is difficult for even educated people to understand.” He added that everywhere, the revolt was the same, different kinds of protests against the same system. “In New York, in Europe, in Israel.” That surprised me a bit. I had not been aware of how news of the summer social justice protests in Israel had diffused to the ground in the Arab countries, except through the interpretations of their interlocutors.

Anyway, at Maspero, the energy was infectious. The activists were united on the call: “End of military rule!” There were also other additions: “Tantawi is a Zionist” (Tantawi is the Field Marshall of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces). This one is amusing to consider in light of those who either dishonestly or hallucinogenically hold that the revolutionaries have no foreign policy goals. Domestic reconstruction will be the first step, but everyone knows the simple truth that if radical populism or democracy begin to take root in Egypt, the détente with Israel, the collaboration in the encaging of the Palestinian people in the Gaza Strip – that will all end. Later someone brought a mock-up of a gallows. I am sure that they are quite serious about it, another reason that the SCAF is clinging so tightly to power.

For a while, people allowed a single lane of traffic to pass, but eventually some group made the decision to stud the roadway with large rocks, blocking traffic. Then they started directing cars in various other directions – during moments of mobilization in the square and elsewhere the popular committees take control of traffic flows. At that point people promptly sat down in the middle of the roadway. There were probably at least 7000 there when I left. Amazing in comparison to the Egypt of 24 months ago, when normal numbers at a protest were 70, but an order of magnitude short of what it would take to effectively besiege Maspero, which has metal grates over the windows of the first two stories, and where every office is guarded by a member of the military with a .50 caliber turret-mounted rifle, another activist told me. I saw one of those rifles in the press office when I was in there over the summer. With the right ammunition, such rifles can put holes in tanks. I don’t know what they can do to people, but if enough people keep up the pressure on Maspero long enough, I do not doubt that the military won’t be worried about finding out.

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Anti-Assad terrorists blow up gas pipeline near Lebanon border

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Haaretz

An “armed terrorist group” in Syria blew up a gas pipeline at dawn Monday, the state-run media said, as activists reported gunfire and explosions in the suburbs of Damascus as the country’s conflict moves ever closer to the capital.

The pipeline carries gas from the central province of Homs to an area near the border with Lebanon. SANA news agency reported that the blast happened in Tal Hosh, which is about five miles (eight kilometers) from Talkalakh, along the border with Lebanon.

Further details were not immediately released.

There have been several pipeline attacks since the Syrian uprising began in mid-March, but it is not clear who is behind them.

President Bashar Assad’s regime has blamed “terrorists” for driving the country’s 10-month-old uprising, not protesters seeking democratic change.

On Sunday, Syrian troops in dozens of tanks and armored vehicles stormed rebellious areas near the capital, shelling neighborhoods that have fallen under the control of army dissidents and clashing with fighters.

Activists and residents said at least 62 people were killed in violence nationwide.

The large-scale Sunday offensive suggested the regime is worried that military defectors could close in on Damascus, the seat of Assad’s power. Early Monday, activists reported hearing gunfire and blasts in the Damascus suburbs, but there were no details.

The rising bloodshed added urgency to Arab and Western diplomatic efforts to end the 10-month conflict.

In the past two weeks, army dissidents have become more visible near the capital, seizing several suburbs on the eastern edge of Damascus and setting up checkpoints where masked men wearing military attire and wielding assault rifles stop motorists and protect anti-regime protests.

Their presence so close to the capital is astonishing in tightly controlled Syria and suggests the Assad regime may either be losing control or setting up a trap for the fighters before going on the offensive.

The uprising against Assad, which began with largely peaceful demonstrations, has grown increasingly militarized recently as more frustrated protesters and army defectors have taken up arms.

In a bid to stamp out resistance in the capital’soutskirts, the military has responded with a withering assault on a string of suburbs, leading to a spike in violence that has killed at least 150 people since Thursday.

The United Nations says at least 5,400 people have been killed in the 10 months of violence.

The UN is holding talks on a new resolution on Syria and next week will discuss an Arab League peace plan aimed at ending the crisis. But the initiatives face two major obstacles: Damascus’ rejection of the Arab plan that it says impinges on its sovereignty, and Russia’s willingness to use its UN Security Council veto to protect Syria from sanctions

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Russia says Syria authorities agree to talks, but opposition refuses

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Syrian opposition says would decline offer to attend talks with Syria authorities in Russia.

 

ed note–keep this in mind folks when reading anything dealing with ‘the opposition’ in Syria–whatever it is they are saying, they are merely acting as a mouthpiece for Israel and America, as they–the opposition–are no more than hired guns for the 2 in bringing down the regime in Syria. ‘No talking’ equates to ‘more shooting’, which is EXACTLY what Israel and America want.

Haaretz

A senior member of the Syrian opposition said on Monday that the Syrian National Council had not received any formal invitation to attend talks with Syria’s authorities in Russia, and would decline if one arrived.

Russia’s Foreign Ministry said the Syrian authorities had agreed to talks in Russia, and that it hoped the opposition would agree.

“We have not received any offer like that officially and I think, if such an offer exists, it will be no more than an attempt to influence the [UN] Security Council. But I say clearly that our position has not changed and it is that there is no dialogue with [President Bashar Assad],” Abdel Baset Seda, a member of the Syrian council’s executive committee, told Reuters.

He was speaking by telephone from New York, where he was following the Arab League’s bid to win support from the Security Council for its Syria peace plan.

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New U.N. Draft Resolution Gives Syria 15 Days to Comply

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By Josh Rogin

January 28, 2012 “FP” — The Cable has obtained a copy of the draft resolution on Syria currently being discussed inside the U.N. Security Council. It calls on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to hand over power to his deputy and says additional measures would be taken if he doesn’t comply within 15 days.

U.N. Security Council diplomats are meeting behind closed doors on Friday to discuss what’s being called the Arab-European draft resolution on Syria. The Moroccan ambassador is presenting the draft resolution, which is designed to implement the recommendations of the Arab League transition plan laid out on Jan. 22.

The draft resolution condemns “the continued widespread and gross violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms by the Syrian authorities,” demands that the Syrian government immediately put an end to all human rights violations, and calls on both sides to end attacks and violence immediately.

The resolution then lays out a political roadmap that matches the Arab League initiative intended to pave the way for a transition  “leading to a democratic, plural political system” through the formation of a national unity government, the handing over of all presidential authority to Assad’s deputy for a transition period, and then the holding of free and fair elections with international supervision.

Importantly, the draft resolution requests that U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon report on the implementation of the resolution every 15 days and also directs the Security Council “to review Syria’s implementation of this resolution [in] 15 days and, in the event that Syria has not complied, to adopt further measures, in consultation with the League of Arab States.”

Representatives from the State Department and the U.S. mission to the United Nations did not immediately respond to requests for comment. But State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland spelled out the broad goals the United States has for the final version of the resolution.

“We are looking for a resolution that reflects the commitments that the Arab League was seeking from the Syrian government, that — in its November 2nd agreement, which unfortunately has not been lived up to by the Syrian side,” Nuland said.

She indicated the United States was hopeful that Russia, which has been openly supporting Assad and sending him weapons, will work with the rest of the Security Council to produce a resolution that is strong and effective. Russia and China vetoed European resolution on Syria last fall and Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Gennady Gatilov said Friday that Russia would veto any resolution that seeks to remove Assad from power.

“We continue to want to work with the Russians so that the whole U.N. Security Council is united in sending the strongest possible message to the Assad regime that the violence has got to end, and we’ve got to begin a transition,” Nuland said.

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Syrian Exiles Push For U.S. Action

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Battling To Be Heard: Syrian exiles are trying to get Washington’s attention for their struggle.

Again, keep in mind as you read this that the various ‘opposition’ groups operating against Assad ARE American/Israeli puppets, and cowardly ones at that, because if they were the true ‘freedom fighters’ they claim to be, they would be in Syria fighting a real war and not pussy-footing around in other countries.

forward.com

Washington — They may be disunited and  unskilled in the ways of Washington, but as carnage continues in Syria, exiled  Syrian dissidents in the United States are urging the Obama administration to  actively support opposition forces struggling to bring down the regime of Bashar  al-Assad.

A loose network of activists — some newly arrived, but most part of an  established Syrian exile community — are urging the administration to set up a  safe zone within Syria on the country’s border with Turkey. This could provide  shelter for dissidents being hunted down by the Assad regime, but would almost  certainly require some form of military intervention by the United States.

Though pursuing their advocacy thousands of miles from home, the Syrian  activists are not clear of danger. As the conflict between the Syrian government  and dissidents has intensified, they say the struggling Damascus regime has  increased its effort to discredit the émigrés as American puppets and to  intimidate them by harassing family members left behind.

“The Syrian Embassy here was operating as a security branch of the Assad  regime. They sent reports to Damascus about all my moves, and after that my  mother was interrogated by the security forces,” said Radwan Ziadeh, a Syrian  dissident who has been advocating on behalf of the Syrian opposition.

The Syrian uprising, which broke out as part of the Arab Spring last March,  has cost the lives of more than 5,000 activists so far, according to the United  Nations, and is far from nearing its end. Forces loyal to Assad forcefully  lashed out at protesters, and a monitoring mission sent to Syria by the Arab  League was unsuccessful in stopping the bloodshed.

Over the past 10 months, the United States has gradually stopped expressing  concern and now openly demands that Assad step down. The United States has also  embraced the Syrian opposition. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has  made a point of meeting publicly with exiled dissidents. But the administration  has stopped short of even suggesting any forceful intervention, preferring  instead to see the Arab League take a leading role in dealing with Syria.

Syrian Americans, a community estimated at 300,000, have mobilized in  response to the events back home. But the community has yet to galvanize around  any of the three main opposition groups — the National Council of Syria, the  Syrian National Coordination Committee or the Free Syrian Army. With no central  organization coordinating Syrian Americans’ advocacy efforts, a dozen or so  pro-democracy Syrian groups now operate in the United States alongside  individual activists who work outside the groups.

“In the Syrian community, dissidents were always isolated,” said Ammar  Abdulhamid, who has been in exile in the United States since 2005. “Because of  this reality, we had to develop our own identity.”

In the period preceding the Arab Spring outbreak, the Syrian community saw an  infusion of opposition figures and political activists who fled Syria in recent  years and are now leading the call on behalf of the opposition movement.

Abdulhamid and his fellow dissidents divide their time between supporting the  opposition in Syria through social networking and spreading information and  lobbying American decision-makers and the American public on the need for a more  active role for the United States. They tread a thin line, trying to prod  Washington to action, but on the other not wanting to be seen as driving the  United States to war.

Washington — “We believe it doesn’t have to be  a Libya-style bombing campaign,” Abdulhamid said. What most activists are asking  for is a supply of light weapons to the opposition, a maritime blockade to stop  the Syrian military from rearming and the establishment of safe zones near the  Syrian-Turkish border. These zones could provide shelter to activists and  refugees, but would require the declaration of no-fly and no-access rules and  the potential use of military force to carry them out.

The administration has rejected such proposals, making clear that, among  other things, it lacks the international backing it had during the uprising in  Libya. “It’s important to note that no member of the Security Council is  advocating for military intervention in Syria, as the Arabs did when they  initiated the action for Libya,” Susan Rice, America’s ambassador to the United  Nations, said in a January 23 meeting in New York with the American Jewish  Committee.

Mark Dubowitz, executive director of the Foundation for Defense of  Democracies, which supports. military action by the United States to maintain  democracy in the Middle East, lamented this position. “People think you need a  perfect situation, like we had in Libya, before we intervene,” he said. “Unfortunately, Libya has become the threshold test, and if that’s what we are  waiting for, it will never happen.”

Ziadeh has been unable to return home to Syria since 2007, when the  government issued an arrest warrant for him shortly after he came to the United  States. With several other activists, he founded the Syrian Center for Political & Strategic Studies, a think tank and advocacy group dedicated to advancing  democracy in Syria. The center’s push for increased pressure from America on  Assad includes meetings with members of Congress and administration officials,  and appeals in the media to move the Syrian issue to the front burner.

“Obviously, the administration has taken some excellent steps,” Ziadeh said, “but since calling for Assad to step down in September, the U.S. has been  leading from behind. If we miss the opportunity now, it will never come  again.”

Ziadeh, who openly met with Clinton last August, said he was called to a  meeting at the Syrian Embassy in Washington and told that information on his  anti-government activities had been sent to security forces in Syria. He said  his mother was interrogated and informed that if she told her son “to be  silent,” she would be granted an exit visa to visit him. A call to the Syrian  embassy seeking comment on Ziadeh’s claim was not returned.

Ziadeh is one of the few Syrian activists to communicate with American Jewish  groups. He appeared twice at events organized by the AJC, a group that has taken  a leading role in supporting Syrian opposition. A video of one of his speeches  was posted on YouTube, presumably by pro-regime activists, with a title  describing Ziadeh as a spy.

Two Syrian dissidents in the United States who gave an interview to Israel’s  daily Yediot Aharonot without disclosing their identity are now in hiding after  the state-run TV in Syria exposed their names and accused them of treason. The  report also included a fabricated letter in which the newspaper supposedly  acknowledges their identity.

Abdulhamid said that talking to Israelis and to Jewish groups is a matter of  controversy within the Syrian exile community, but he is among those who  maintain contacts with Jewish activists in Washington. “It’s true that at times  we are demonized when we do so, but we forget that if we want our rights, we  need to communicate,” he said. “We need to develop diplomatic skills.”

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Report: Attempt to smuggle Assad’s wife out of Syria foiled

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www.theuglytruth.wordpress.com

Syrian opposition sources tell Egyptian daily al-Masri al-Youm that Free Syrian Army rebel forces managed to prevent escape of first lady Asma Assad, relatives

ed note–let’s cut past all the fancy language and say what this is really all about–

KIDNAPPING and HOSTAGE TAKING

Here we have the rebels talking about their plans to take as hostage innocent women and children in order to further their political goals, which in truth AREN’T THEIRS AT ALL, BUT RATHER THOSE OF ISRAEL AND THE US.

WHERE IS THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA TO DISCUSS THIS? WHERE IS THE PRESS CONFERENCE FROM THE US PRESIDENT AND STATE DEPARTMENT CONDEMING SUCH ACTIONS??? ISN’T TAKING HOSTAGES CONSIDERED A ‘COWARD’S WAY’ OF WAGING WAR??? WEREN’T THE IRANIANS ‘TERRORISTS’ FOR TAKING AMERICAN HOSTAGES AFTER THEIR REVOLUTION IN 1979???

Has Bashar Assad’s wife been attempting to follow in the footsteps of the wife of Muammar Gadaffi? Egypt’s al-Masri al-Youm newspaper reported Sunday that Syrian rebels thwarted an attempt to smuggle Asma Assad, wife of Syrian President Bashar Assad out of the country.

Sources within the Syrian opposition said that the Free Syrian Army forces managed to prevent the escape of the first lady of Syria and additional relatives through Damascus airport.

According to the Egyptian daily, the sources claimed that Asma Assad, her children, Bashar Assad’s mother and his cousin were all in a convoy on the way to the airport when rebel forces under the command of a former senior officer in the Syrian army, blocked the their path.

After heavy exchanges of fire, the presidential security forces managed to get the convoy back to the presidential palace. The opposition sources alleged that Assad’s security forces pursued the deserter general, Mahmoud Halouf, former head of the Palestine branch of Syrian intelligence.

Tactical withdrawal?

The general’s unit, all former soldiers who deserted with him, 300 in total, said that when they saw the convoy the believed it was an attempt to smuggle senior officials out of the country – which is why they blocked the convoy’s path.

Meanwhile, Armored forces loyal to President Assad took control on Sunday of eastern suburbs of Damascus that had fallen into opposition control after two days of bombardment and fighting with rebels, activists said.

“The Free Syrian Army has made a tactical withdrawal. Regime forces have re-occupied the suburbs and started making house to house arrests,” Kamal, one of the activists, said by phone from the eastern Ghouta area on the edge Damascus.

He was referring to army defectors loosely grouped under the Free Syrian Army.

If the report about Asma Assad’s attempted escape is true, it would not be the first time during the Arab Spring that relatives of a failing ruler find a way to escape. Last August Muammar Gaddafi’s wife and three of his children managed to escape war-torn Libya and reach Algeria. Gaddafi was killed not long after.

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