Archive | December 16th, 2014

IDLIB: HALLOOZ LIBERATED; RATS HIDING IN CHICKEN COOPS

NOVANEWS
THE NEWS FROM THE BASES AND DAYR EL-ZOR

الجيش السوري يبدأ المرحلة الثانية من عمليات القصير

IDLIB:

Hallooz Village:  A village nestled in the mountains just to the west of Jisr Al-Shughoor.  This is my wife’s mother’s home town.  It is totally Christian with most residents being related to one another. There is a church with a fountain that spews ice cold, crystal clear mountain spring water that is absolutely luscious.  It is no secret why rats from derelict nations like Libya, Saudi Arabia or Sudan would want to nest here and drive the indigenous Christians out.

Well, yesterday, a crack unit of paratroopers invaded the town at dawn and struck hard at a chicken hatchery killing every single miserable cockroach there.  Weapons and ammunition were seized and reserved for the Popular Defense Committees.  I have not received the names of the 14 vermin whose carcasses were quickly reduced to dust and ash.

Al-Jaanoodiyya Village:  Also, in the Jisr Al-Shughoor area.  The same unit of paratroopers put these rats to death:

Abu Al-Baraa` Al-Leebi (LIBYAN SNAKE SLIME AND PIGLET MOLESTER)

Abu Muhammad Al-Sa’oodi (SAUDI ARABIAN HOG LINT)

Kafr ‘Uwayd:  Near Ma’arrat Al-Nu’maan, 65kms from Idlib City.  In this area you find mostly Nusra, Jabhat Thuwwaar Sooriyya, Harakat Hazm, Ahraar Al-Shaam and Jund Al-Aqsa.  You find them here because they have safe houses in Turkey where they are protected by the Turk runt and mass murderer, Erdoghan.  Yesterday, in an operation linked to the upcoming assault on the Khaan Shaykhoon area, the SAA killed 6 Nusra rats.  I have no names.

The situation at the 2 military bases, Waadi Dhayf and Al-Haamidiyya, is murky.  It appears that the SAA left Waadi Dhayf to reinforce at Al-Haamidiyya.  I won’t write until I am certain about the events there.  I will transmit any information I get to you when I’m certain the information is accurate.

Darkoosh:  SAA clashed with Nusra rats here and killed a reported 4 while wounding an undisclosed number.  I have no names.

Mu’allali Village:  A number of vultures were killed along with the destruction of the van transporting them. No other details.

DAYR EL-ZOR:  We are always delighted to report new alliances with the SAA.  Two days ago, we learned that 200 members of the large Shu’aytaat Tribe joined the PDC and are now helping to protect the city of Dayr El-Zor alongside the great Syrian Army.  As many of you know, this tribe was subjected to unspeakable brutality at the hands of the ISIS barbarians and their members are itching for revenge.  I wouldn’t want to be an ISIS prisoner in their hands any more than I’d want to be a Khwarezmian Shah in the hands of Genghiz Khan.     

Jafra Village:  The SAA has opened a new corridor into this important area, piercing ISIS defenses and killing a number of the rats.  Extremely heavy combat going on now.  No details are available yet.

Al-Huwayqa: NDF fought hand-to-hand combat with attacking ISIS rats who were only 20 meters away behind their fortifications.  No details.

MuHassan Town:  SAA artillery is shattering ISIS positions here as most of the population has departed.  Reports of Shu’aytaat tribesmen assisting the SAA by cleaning up areas.  This town is a C&C HQ for ISIS and its fall would be a boon to the SAA and the war against its savagery.

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SYRIAN ARMY REPELS ANOTHER FLACCID ATTACK ON DZ AB

NOVANEWS

Syrian Army

This appears to be the 4th time ISIS has endeavored to enter and occupy the Dayr El-Zor Airbase.  This time, they came from the north but were repelled by SAA artillery followed by a merciless SAA infantry attack on fleeing hyenas.  SAA has confirmed 5 deaths with many more believed to have fallen and taken away by their litter-mates.  Among the carcasses were several Libyan and Tunisian ape leaders including:

Hamdaan Al-Jamal

Also, the SAAF flew 20 sorties over Huwayjat Al-Sakr killing an undisclosed number of rats.

ELSAHEFA-28994-2

  Here’s a nice view of the airbase

HAMA:  SYRIAN ARMY SAPPERS DISMANTLE ONE AND ONE-HALF TON IED EAST OF THE CITY IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA:

تفكيك سيارة مفخخة بطن ونصف من المتفجرات في المنطقة الصناعية بحماة

The City:  To the East is the Industrial area where 1 and 1/2 tons of TNT and C-4 were stuffed into a van rigged to explode by remote control.  The IED was reportedly shaped like a square.  The dismantling went off without a hitch.

Qastoon:  At the intersection, the SAA engaged a pack of Nusra rodents and killed all 9 of them as they tried to break through SAA lines.

NEWS AND VIDEOS:

Laugh yourselves silly with this wonderful parody of Jihadist nonsense sent to us by Takfiri Jihadist ISIS Parrot:

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=76f_1418314687#UrQpki7kGzx42wHy.99

Heretic Idiot of the Year might still be another cleric from the Asian Subcontinent.  Get this nonsense and try to keep your breakfast down:

http://awdnews.com/top-news/10395-unbelievable-isis-beheads-to-save-american-lives-,-says-radical-preacher.html

 

Posted in SyriaComments Off on SYRIAN ARMY REPELS ANOTHER FLACCID ATTACK ON DZ AB

Zio-Wahhabi regime blocks human rights group website

NOVANEWS
 

A regional human rights group on Tuesday denounced what it called Saudi intimidation, saying its website has been blocked by authorities in the conservative Gulf nation.

Attempts inside Saudi Arabia to access the Internet site of the Gulf Center for Human Rights (http://gc4hr.org) brought up a notice saying: “Sorry, the requested page is unavailable.”

Still accessible outside Saudi Arabia, the center posted a message saying it “deplores the blocking of its website… by the Saudi authorities and considers it as a form of repression that is part of intimidation patterns that are being used persistently in the Kingdom these days.”

It did not say what might have prompted the censorship, but said it occurred “at a time when human rights defenders are exposed to various kinds of harassment and arrests, arbitrary imprisonment and unfair trials that lack legal procedures and minimum international standards.”

After Saudi police arrested on Monday two women on the UAE border for driving, the center published a report explaining the arrest and calling for authorities to release the detained, in a reminder of the oil-rich kingdom’s violations of basic human rights.

Countless news websites are blocked in Saudi Arabia, including Al-Akhbar.

Meanwhile, a court in Saudi ally and neighbor Bahrain on Monday sentenced in absentia the director of the center, Maryam al-Khawaja, to a year’s jail for allegedly assaulting police.

Khawaja, daughter of jailed Bahraini Shia opposition figure Abdulhadi al-Khawaja, refused to attend the hearing, saying a fair trial was not possible.

London-based watchdog Amnesty International said last month that Saudi authorities “have sought to stamp out all critical voices demanding peaceful reform.”

In February, media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) said that Gulf monarchies, fearful of unrest, have stepped up efforts to monitor and control the media, particularly online.

Saudi Arabia, which is on the group’s “Enemies of the Internet” list, has been particularly aggressive in policing the Internet, including by arresting those who post critical articles or comments, RSF said.

Scores of Saudis have been arrested over the years for posting content critical of the Wahhabi regime on Twitter and other social media outlets.

Saudi judges have this year passed death sentences on five pro-democracy advocates, including prominent activist and cleric Nimr al-Nimr, for their part in protests.

Posted in Saudi ArabiaComments Off on Zio-Wahhabi regime blocks human rights group website

Two Saudi women remain in custody a week after defying driving ban

NOVANEWS
 Secrets Behind the Veil: Memoirs of an Expatriate Woman in Saudi Arabia

A Saudi activist and family members said Sunday that two Saudi women have been detained for six days for defying the kingdom’s driving ban, according to the Associated Press (AP).

A Saudi woman who tried to drive into the kingdom in defiance of a ban was arrested last Monday after being blocked at the border with the United Arab Emirates for a day.

“I have been at the Saudi border for 24 hours. They don’t want to give me my passport nor will they let me pass,” Loujain Hathloul said in a Tweet at around midday Monday, before Tweets from @LoujainHathloul stopped and the hashtag #Loujain_on_the_border started trending on the social media website.

“The customs (department) have no right to prevent me from entering even if in their opinion I am ‘a violator’ because I am Saudi,” 25-year-old Hathloul tweeted early Monday, adding that her driving license “is valid in all GCC countries,” a reference to the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council which includes Saudi Arabia.

Another woman, UAE-based Saudi journalist Maysaa Alamoudi, who went to support her, was also arrested, a Saudi activist and family members told AP Sunday.

They all spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of government reprisal.

The oil-rich kingdom is the only country in the world that bans women from driving.

Activists say women’s driving is not actually against the law, and the ban is linked to tradition and custom ultra-conservative Wahhabi nation, and not backed by Islamic text or judicial ruling.

Some leading members of the country’s powerful Wahhabi clergy have argued against women being allowed to drive, which they say could lead to them mingling with unrelated men, thereby breaching strict gender segregation rules.

Last November the kingdom’s top cleric, Sheikh Abdul Aziz bin Abdullah al-Sheikh, said the female driving prohibition protects society from “evil” and should not be a major concern.
In October, dozens of women drove and posted images of themselves doing so as part of an online campaign supporting the right to drive.

They also circulated an online petition asking the Saudi government to “lift the ban on women driving” in a move that attracted more than 2,400 signatures ahead of the campaign’s culmination on October 26.

“The issue is not that of simply a vehicle driven by a woman, but the acknowledgement and recognition of the humanity of half of society and the God-given rights of women,” the petition states.

Last year, activists also focused their demands on October 26 – which they call a “symbolic” date as part of efforts to press for women’s right to drive.

In response, the interior ministry said it would “strictly implement” measures against anyone undermining “the social cohesion.”

Women who have defied the law in the past have been harassed by compatriots and run into trouble with the authorities as they would be arrested and have their cars confiscated.

In 2013, a woman was arrested for driving her diabetic father to the hospital.

In 2011, activist Manal al-Sharif, one of the organizers of October 26 campaign, was arrested and held nine days for posting online a video of herself behind the wheel.

That year Saudi police arrested a number of women who defied the driving ban and forced them to sign a pledge not to drive again.

In 1990, authorities stopped 47 women who got behind the wheel in a demonstration against the driving ban.

Late October, the UN Human Rights Council urged Saudi Arabia to crack down on discrimination against women among other rights abuses.

The council had already adopted a report listing 225 recommendations for improvements a couple of days earlier in Geneva during a Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the oil-rich kingdom’s rights record.

Many of the UN recommendations called on Riyadh to abolish a system requiring women to seek permission from male relatives to work, marry or leave the country, and one urged it to lift the driving ban.

The Wahhabi kingdom has strict policies segregating genders in public spaces and restricting women’s freedoms.

Currently all nine million Saudi women, regardless of economic and social status, are prohibited from studying, traveling, working, accessing governmental institutions, undergoing medical treatment or surgical procedures including childbirth, without the consent of their male guardians.

According to a number of activists, these restrictions on freedom of movement and access to basic human rights as a result of such rigorously imposed rules have led to the death of a number of Saudi women which could have otherwise been avoided.

Hardline clerics protested when King Abdullah, in January last year, decided to give women a 20 percent quota in the previously all-male Shura Council of 150 members.
The Shura Council is appointed by the king and advises the monarch on policy, but cannot legislate.

Riyadh has taken a zero tolerance approach to all attempts at protest or dissent in the kingdom, including by liberal rights activists, Islamists, and members of the Shia minority.

Posted in Saudi ArabiaComments Off on Two Saudi women remain in custody a week after defying driving ban

Zio-Wahhbi regime extends detention of activists who defied driving ban

NOVANEWS
 Secrets Behind the Burqa

Saudi authorities extended the detention of two women’s rights activists, one of whom tried to drive into the kingdom in defiance of a ban, Amnesty International said on Tuesday.

Saudi Arabia, a key US ally, is the only country in the world which does not allow women to drive.

Loujain Hathloul and Maysaa Alamoudi will be detained for 25 more days, the London-based watchdog said in a statement.

“Jailing a woman for simply driving a car is preposterous,” Said Boumedouha, Amnesty’s deputy director for the Middle East and North Africa, was quoted saying in the statement.

The Interior Ministry has still not commented on the case of the two women.

Border officers stopped Hathloul when she tried to drive from neighboring United Arab Emirates (UAE) into Saudi Arabia on November 30.

Alamoudi, a UAE-based Saudi journalist, later arrived to support her.

Both activists were arrested and are being held in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province.

Relatives of the two women declined to comment on Tuesday.

Hathloul was trying to make a point in her unusual attempt to drive through the border and knew that she would not be allowed to pass, an activist has told AFP.

Activists started a petition calling for the release of Hathloul and Alamoudi.

Women drivers in the kingdom have previously been arrested and cars have been confiscated but the detention of Hathloul is already among the longest given to any female driver in the kingdom recently, activists told AFP.

Activists say women’s driving is not actually against the law, and the ban is linked to tradition and custom ultra-conservative Wahhabi nation, and not backed by Islamic text or judicial ruling.

Some leading members of the country’s powerful Wahhabi clergy have argued against women being allowed to drive, which they say could lead to them mingling with unrelated men, thereby breaching strict gender segregation rules.

Last November the kingdom’s top cleric, Sheikh Abdul Aziz bin Abdullah al-Sheikh, said the female driving prohibition protects society from “evil” and should not be a major concern.

In October, dozens of women drove and posted images of themselves doing so as part of an online campaign supporting the right to drive.

They also circulated an online petition asking the Saudi government to “lift the ban on women driving” in a move that attracted more than 2,400 signatures ahead of the campaign’s culmination on October 26.

“The issue is not that of simply a vehicle driven by a woman, but the acknowledgement and recognition of the humanity of half of society and the God-given rights of women,” the petition states.

Last year, activists also focused their demands on October 26 – which they call a “symbolic” date as part of efforts to press for women’s right to drive.

In response, the interior ministry said it would “strictly implement” measures against anyone undermining “the social cohesion.”

Women who have defied the law in the past have been harassed by compatriots and run into trouble with the authorities as they would be arrested and have their cars confiscated.

In 2013, a woman was arrested for driving her diabetic father to the hospital.

In 2011, activist Manal al-Sharif, one of the organizers of October 26 campaign, was arrested and held nine days for posting online a video of herself behind the wheel.

That year Saudi police arrested a number of women who defied the driving ban and forced them to sign a pledge not to drive again.

In 1990, authorities stopped 47 women who got behind the wheel in a demonstration against the driving ban.

Late October, the UN Human Rights Council urged Saudi Arabia to crack down on discrimination against women among other rights abuses.

The council had already adopted a report listing 225 recommendations for improvements a couple of days earlier in Geneva during a Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the oil-rich kingdom’s rights record.

Many of the UN recommendations called on Riyadh to abolish a system requiring women to seek permission from male relatives to work, marry or leave the country, and one urged it to lift the driving ban.

The Wahhabi kingdom has strict policies segregating genders in public spaces and restricting women’s freedoms.

In late November, a number of restaurants in Saudi Arabia decided to ban women “without a male custodian” from their premises.

Discriminatory signs, reminiscent of anti-black racism, reading “Women are not allowed” were spotted outside restaurants across the kingdom.

Currently all nine million Saudi women, regardless of economic and social status, are prohibited from studying, traveling, working, accessing governmental institutions, undergoing medical treatment or surgical procedures including childbirth, without the consent of their male guardians.

According to a number of activists, these restrictions on freedom of movement and access to basic human rights as a result of such rigorously imposed rules have led to the death of a number of Saudi women which could have otherwise been avoided.

Hardline clerics protested when King Abdullah, in January last year, decided to give women a 20 percent quota in the previously all-male Shura Council of 150 members.

The Shura Council is appointed by the king and advises the monarch on policy, but cannot legislate.

Riyadh has taken a zero tolerance approach to all attempts at protest or dissent in the kingdom, including by liberal rights activists, Islamists, and members of the Shia minority.

Posted in Saudi ArabiaComments Off on Zio-Wahhbi regime extends detention of activists who defied driving ban

Zio-Wahhabi Rat severs hand of man accused of theft as execution toll hits 80

NOVANEWS

Saudi authorities on Monday severed the hand of a Yemeni national convicted of repeated theft, under the medieval interpretation of Islamic law enforced in Saudi Arabia.

A court had ordered the amputation of Ibrahim Abdulrahman Hazbar’s right hand after convicting him of a “series of thefts,” the interior ministry said.

The punishment was carried out in the western city of Mecca, home to the holiest sites in Islam.

US-ally Saudi Arabia implements a wide range of brutal punishments, including flogging, hefty fines and exaggerated prison sentences, for minor crimes.

Last week, Saudi authorities extended the detention of two women’s rights activists by 25 days, one of whom tried to drive into the kingdom in defiance of a ban.

Other non-lethal crimes such as “adultery,” armed robbery, “apostasy,” drug-related offenses, rape, “witchcraft”, and “sorcery” are all punishable by death in the kingdom.

According to an AFP tally, 80 convicts have been executed in the country this year, despite international concerns over the number and judicial process.

The oil-rich kingdom saw the third highest number of executions in the world last year, according to Amnesty International.

In September, two independent human rights experts working on behalf of the United Nations expressed concern about the judicial process in Saudi Arabia and called for an immediate moratorium on the death penalty.

“Despite several calls by human rights bodies, Saudi Arabia continues to execute individuals with appalling regularity and in flagrant disregard of international law standards,” said Christof Heyns, the UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.

Political activism can also be penalized by death, as Saudi Arabia, like neighboring Bahrain, has taken a zero tolerance approach to all attempts at protest or dissent in the kingdom, including by liberal rights activists, Islamists, and members of the Shia minority.

Saudi judges have this year passed death sentences down to five pro-democracy advocates, including prominent activist and cleric Nimr al-Nimr, for their part in protests.

The new Saudi Terrorism law issued early this year casts a wide net over what it considers to be “terrorism.”

Under the law, punishable offenses include ”calling for atheist thought in any form,” “throwing away loyalty to the country’s rulers,” and “seeking to shake the social fabric or national cohesion.”

”These broad provisions contain language that prosecutors and judges are already using to prosecute and convict independent activists and peaceful dissidents,” Human Rights Watch said in a statement.

Posted in Saudi ArabiaComments Off on Zio-Wahhabi Rat severs hand of man accused of theft as execution toll hits 80

Pakistan Taliban: Peshawar school attack leaves 141 dead

NOVANEWS

Militants from the Pakistani Taliban have attacked a school in Peshawar, killing 141 people, 132 of them children, the military say.

Pakistani officials say the attack is now over, with all of the attackers killed. A total of seven militants took part, according to the army.

Scores of survivors are being treated in hospitals as frantic parents search for news of their children.

The attack is the deadliest ever by the Taliban in Pakistan.

There has been chaos outside hospital units to which casualties were taken, the BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil reports from Peshawar.

Bodies have been carried out of hospitals in coffins, escorted by crowds of mourners, some of them visibly distraught.

Mourners carry the coffin of a student from a hospital in Peshawar, 16 December
Coffins are being carried out of Peshawar hospitals
Empty coffins stacked at a hospital in Peshawar, 16 December
Empty coffins were delivered to a hospital in Peshawar in readiness for the removal of the dead
Relatives comfort injured student Mohammad Baqair in Peshawar, 16 December
School pupil Mohammad Baqair lost his mother, a teacher, in the attack

A Taliban spokesman told BBC Urdu that the school, which is run by the army, had been targeted in response to army operations.

Hundreds of Taliban fighters are thought to have died in a recent military offensive in North Waziristan and the nearby Khyber area.

US President Barack Obama condemned the “horrific attack (…) in the strongest possible terms”.

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Analysis: Aamer Ahmed Khan, BBC News

This brutal attack may well be a watershed for a country long accused by the world of treating terrorists as strategic assets.

Pakistan’s policy-makers struggling to come to grips with various shades of militants have often cited a “lack of consensus” and “large pockets of sympathy” for religious militants as a major stumbling-block.

That is probably why, when army chief Gen Raheel Sharif launched what he called an indiscriminate operation earlier in the year against militant groups in Pakistan’s lawless tribal belt, the political response was lukewarm at best.

We will get them, was his message, be they Pakistani Taliban, Punjabi Taliban, al-Qaeda and affiliates, or most importantly, the dreaded Haqqani network. But the country’s political leadership chose to remain largely silent. This is very likely to change now.

line
BBC map, showing the army school in Peshawar
Relatives wait outside a hospital in Peshawar, 16 December
Anxious family members crowded around Peshawar hospitals
Soldiers help evacuate children
Troops helped evacuate children from the school
Injured student being evacuated
A total of 114 people were injured

Military spokesman Asim Bajwa told reporters in Peshawar that 132 children and nine members of staff had been killed.

All seven of the attackers wore suicide bomb vests, he said. Scores of people were also injured.

It appears the militants scaled walls to get into the school and set off a bomb at the start of the assault.

Children who escaped say the militants then went from one classroom to another, shooting indiscriminately.

One boy told reporters he had been with a group of 10 friends who tried to run away and hide. He was the only one to survive.

Others described seeing pupils lying dead in the corridors. One local woman said her friend’s daughter had escaped because her clothing was covered in blood from those around her and she had lain pretending to be dead.

Deadly attacks in Pakistan
Mourners after the Peshawar church attack, 22 September 2013

16 December 2014: Taliban attack on school in Peshawar leaves at least 141 people dead, 132 of them children

22 September 2013: Militants linked to the Taliban kill at least 80 peopleat a church in Peshawar, in one of the worst attacks on Christians

10 January 2013: Militant bombers target the Hazara Shia Muslim minority in the city of Quetta, killing 120 at a snooker hall and on a street

28 May 2010: Gunmen attack two mosques of the minority Ahmadi Islamic sect in Lahore, killing more than 80 people

18 October 2007: Twin bomb attack at a rally for Benazir Bhutto in Karachi leaves at least 130 dead. Unclear if Taliban behind attack

A hospital doctor treating injured children said many had head and chest injuries.

Irshadah Bibi, a woman who lost her 12-year-old son, was seen beating her face in grief, throwing herself against an ambulance.

“O God, why did you snatch away my son?” AFP news agency quoted her as saying.

An injured girl is carried to hospital in Peshawar, 16 December
Some of the injured were carried to hospital in people’s arms
Children fleeing the school
Both girls and boys went to the school
Pakistani troops at the scene
Troops sealed off the area around the school

The school is near a military complex in Peshawar. The city, close to the Afghan border, has seen some of the worst of the violence during the Taliban insurgency in recent years.

Many of the students were the children of military personnel. Most of them would have been aged 16 or under.

Hundreds of parents are outside the school waiting for news of their children, according to Wafis Jan from the Red Crescent

Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani Nobel laureate who was shot by the Taliban for campaigning for the right to an education, condemned the attack.

“I, along with millions of others around the world, mourn these children, my brothers and sisters, but we will never be defeated,” she said.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, who has arrived in Peshawar, described the attack as a “national tragedy”. Pakistani opposition leader and former cricket captain Imran Khan condemned it as “utter barbarism”.

A Taliban spokesman was quoted by Reuters as saying the school had been attacked because the “government is targeting our families and females”.

Posted in Pakistan & KashmirComments Off on Pakistan Taliban: Peshawar school attack leaves 141 dead

Zio-Wahhabi rat carries out 82nd execution of 2014

NOVANEWS

Assasin - Business Portfolio

Two Saudis were beheaded on Tuesday for drug trafficking and murder, official media reported, bringing to 82 the number of executions this year.

The sentence against Abdulrahman bin Bakheit al-Lugmani was carried out in the western city of Mecca, the interior ministry said in a statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency.

He had been convicted of smuggling a large quantity of amphetamines, it said.

The second execution was in Eastern Province. Mehdi al-Mahmoud had been convicted of shooting dead another man following a dispute, the ministry said.

Other non-lethal crimes such as “adultery,” armed robbery, “apostasy,” drug-related offenses, rape, “witchcraft”, and “sorcery” are all punishable by death in the kingdom.

According to an AFP tally, 82 Saudis and foreigners have been beheaded in the oil-rich kingdom this year, with more than two thirds of the executions carried out over the past four months.

There were 78 executions last year.

The oil-rich Gulf state saw the third highest number of executions in the world last year, according to Amnesty International.

In September, two independent human rights experts working on behalf of the United Nations expressed concern about the judicial process in Saudi Arabia and called for an immediate moratorium on the death penalty.

“Despite several calls by human rights bodies, Saudi Arabia continues to execute individuals with appalling regularity and in flagrant disregard of international law standards,” said Christof Heyns, the UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.

Political activism can also be penalized by death, as US-ally Saudi Arabia, like neighboring Bahrain, has taken a zero tolerance approach to all attempts at protest or dissent in the kingdom, including by liberal rights activists, Islamists, and members of the Shia minority.

Saudi judges have this year passed death sentences down to five pro-democracy advocates, including prominent activist and cleric Nimr al-Nimr, for their part in protests.

The new Saudi Terrorism law issued early this year casts a wide net over what it considers to be “terrorism.”

Under the law, punishable offenses include ”calling for atheist thought in any form,” “throwing away loyalty to the country’s rulers,” and “seeking to shake the social fabric or national cohesion.”

”These broad provisions contain language that prosecutors and judges are already using to prosecute and convict independent activists and peaceful dissidents,” Human Rights Watch said in a statement.

Moreover, Saudi Arabia implements a wide range of brutal punishments, including flogging, hefty fines and exaggerated prison sentences, for minor crimes.

Last week, Saudi authorities extended the detention of two women’s rights activists by 25 days, one of whom tried to drive into the kingdom in defiance of a ban.

Posted in Saudi ArabiaComments Off on Zio-Wahhabi rat carries out 82nd execution of 2014

Iraq says 2,700 missing since ISIS onslaught in June

NOVANEWS
 VINTAGE SADDAM HUSSEIN GLOSSY POSTER PICTURE PHOTO old historical iraq gray 1700

Saddam Hussein

At least 2,700 people, mostly soldiers, are missing as a result of attacks by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) group in Iraq, the Iraqi human rights ministry said on Monday.

More than half of those registered as missing by the government are soldiers who were at the Speicher base which the jihadists captured six months ago near Tikrit.

“The number of missing from Speicher base has reached 1,660, from Badush prison 487, in addition to 554 from other areas, including 38 women,” the ministry said in a statement.

Badush is a prison outside the northern city of Mosul, which ISIS has used as its main hub in Iraq since it launched an offensive in June and captured large swathes of territory in the country.

The ministry said those numbers are based on applications filed by relatives and subsequent checking with the relevant ministries.

“The number of missing is likely higher than this,” ministry spokesman Kamel al-Amin told AFP, since some families who have been displaced by the violence or live in areas under jihadis control were not able to report a missing relative.

Amin added that the ministry had asked the families of those confirmed to be missing to provide DNA samples “in order to identify victims who might later be found in mass graves.”

According to Human Rights Watch (HRW), ISIS gunmen executed up to 600 inmates from Badush prison on June 10, forcing them to kneel along a nearby ravine before pushing them in and setting fire to the bodies.

The following day, they seized the Speicher base and claimed to have executed 1,700 troops.

HRW was able to find evidence that at least 560 had been killed.

Major attacks on army bases in the western province in September are also believed to have left hundreds of troops dead or missing.

The UN released a 29-page study early October, listing a litany of gross abuses and violations of international humanitarian law being perpetrated by ISIS and associated armed groups “with an apparent systematic and widespread character” in Iraq.

Among them were attacks on civilians, including executions and looting, as well as the murder of captured army soldiers and officials.

In August, the report said, ISIS took 450-500 women and girls to the Tal Afar citadel in Iraq’s Nineveh region where “150 unmarried girls and women, predominantly from the Yazidi and Christian communities, were reportedly transported to Syria, either to be given to ISIS fighters as a reward or to be sold as sex slaves.”

The fate of the girls remains unknown.

HRW released a report early November saying that ISIS militants in Syria, where they also also declared a caliphate in territories under their control, forced children as young as 14 to watch videos of beheadings and beat them with cables during six months of captivity.

The militants abducted a group of children on May 29 as they returned to the Syrian town of Kobane after taking school exams in the city of Aleppo. It freed the final 25 hostages on October 29.

Posted in IraqComments Off on Iraq says 2,700 missing since ISIS onslaught in June

ISIS releases photos of tribesmen executions near Iraq’s Tikrit

NOVANEWS
 

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) group on Monday released pictures of the execution of 13 men described as “anti-jihadist” tribal fighters near the northern city of Tikrit.

Three pictures published on a jihadist forum and on pro-ISIS social media accounts show the execution of men wearing orange jumpsuits.

Local residents confirmed to AFP that a mass execution had taken place on a large roundabout six kilometers (four miles) east of the city of Tikrit at around 3:30 pm.

The first picture shows 11 men kneeling, heads bowed, with one black-clad and masked gunman behind each one and ISIS flags in the background.

The next picture shows the gunmen brandishing their handguns after the execution, and in the third a small gathering of onlookers, including children, can be seen near 13 bodies, which have been dragged off the roundabout’s central island and onto the road.

Residents said the roundabout is at an intersection for roads leading to Tikrit, Kirkuk and the town of al-Alam.

They said the men who were executed were members of an anti-ISIS group of tribal fighters known as the Knights of al-Alam who were captured by militants in Tikrit and al-Alam around 10 days earlier.

The city of Tikrit has been under ISIS control since the beginning of the militants’ major offensive in Iraq six months ago.

ISIS has so far executed thousands in Iraq and Syria, targeting, in particular, ethnic and religious minorities, as well any who oppose the group’s ideology.

Iraq’s government has been encouraging tribes to rise up against the extremist group that met little resistance when it swept through the country’s heartland in June.

On June 12, 2014, ISIS killed at least 1,700 Iraqi Air Force soldiers in an attack on Camp Speicher in Tikrit, northwest of the Iraqi capital. At the time of the attack there were between 4,000 and 11,000 unarmed cadets in the camp.

On September 22, ISIS executed women’s rights activist Samira Saleh al-Nuaimi, reportedly because she had condemned the demolition of historical heritage sites by ISIS on social media.

Large swathes of land in Iraq have become ISIS strongholds as the extremist group, which declared a “caliphate” in the territory it seized in Iraq and Syria, drove Iraq’s army to collapse. A US-led air campaign against the group since August has failed to push back ISIS in either country.

However, the Iraqi army, backed by volunteering fighters, has inflicted a string of defeats on the jihadists in recent weeks.

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