Archive | January 4th, 2016

Saudi Protesters Call for Overthrow of Zio-Wahhabi Regime

NOVANEWS
EXCLUSIVE: Saudi Protesters Call for Overthrow of Al Saud Regime
TEHRAN (FNA)- Hundreds of Saudi people protesting against the Zio-Wahhabi regime  execution of prominent Shiite cleric Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr in the Eastern part of the kingdom called for the downfall of the Al Saud dynasty.

Large groups of angry protesters chanted slogans such as “Down with Al Saud” in the village of Awamiyah in Qatif region, and underlined their resolve to overthrow the Saudi regime, FNA dispatches said.

They condemned the execution of Sheikh Nimr and suppression of the Shiite minority by the Zio-Wahhabi regime.

The call by protesters for Al Saud’s overthrow came as Saudi Arabia’s police killed a young man and injured another civilian during popular protests in Qatif region in the Eastern part of the kingdom to condemn Sheikh Nimr’s execution by the Zio-Wahhabi regime.

Ali Omran al-Dawood was killed when the Zio-Wahhabi police started shooting at the protesters in the village of Awamiyah in Qatif region.

An eight-year-old boy was also injured during the shootout.

Large groups of protesters were also beaten and arrested as security forces surrounded a group of young Saudis who were burning tires in protest at Sheikh Nimr’s execution.

Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime announced Saturday that it has executed the prominent Shiite Muslim cleric.

Sunni and Shiite Muslims from across the world rushed to condemn his execution, vowing revenge.

Saudi people still continue protest rallies in different parts of the kingdom’s Eastern province of Qatif, specially Awamiyah and Qatif towns, to condemn execution prominent cleric Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr and suppression of the Shiite minority.

Field sources from Awamiyah and Qatif said that the two regions are in a state of war with hundreds of Saudi Zio-Wahhabi army troops deployed in streets.

Zio-Wahhabi troops have so far made tens of arrests, while local residents say protesters are beaten, arrested and shot at.

The angry people set fire to a police center, several military vehicles and a bus in Qatif.

Also on Anizah al-Badaya road near al-Qassim city, a 29-year-old man ran over a Saudi Zio-Wahhabi security force and killed him.

After the declaration, thousands of Bahraini people poured to the streets and chanted “death to the al-Saud” slogans.

The Bahrainis who also carried some placards to show their support for Sheikh Nimr warned Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime that shedding the cleric’s blood will not remain unanswered.

Lebanon’s Hezbollah, Yemen’s Ansarullah, Pakistan’s Shiite Assembly and tens of Sunni and Shiite figures, groups and movements across the world have rushed to condemn the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime, all underlining that Riyadh has poured oil to the flames of sectarian strife.

In Palestine, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) in a statement condemned the killing of the prominent Muslim cleric, and said, “The execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr shows that Saudi Arabia insists on pouring oil to the flames of sectarian sedition.”

Sheikh Nimr’s execution was also condemned by Head of Iraq’s Badr Organization Hadi al-Ameri who expressed deep regret after hearing the news.

The Iranian Sunni figures also showed reaction to the Saudi cleric’s killing by Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime.

Molawi Abdolhamid Ismailzehi, the Friday prayers leader of Iran’s Southeastern city of Zahedan, expressed deep regret over Sheikh Nimr’s execution, and said under the conditions that the Muslim world needs unity, the Saudi officials should have refrained from his killing.

Also, representative of Iran’s Sunni-populated Southeastern province of Sistan and Balouchestan at the Assembly of Experts, Molawi Nazir Ahmad Salami, condemned Sheikh Nimr’s execution, and said, “There is no difference between the Shiites and Sunnis and any person who is opposed to tyranny and brutality should show reaction and deplore the Saudi measure.”

Also, Chairman of the Sunni Lawmakers’ Fraction at the Iranian parliament Abed Fattahi deplored the execution of Sheikh Nimr by Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime, and said the bells have now started ringing for the collapse of the Saudi regime.

He also said that Saudi Arabia’s support for the terrorists, the mismanagement of Mina incident, execution of Sheikh Nimr and several other crimes by Riyadh, “closed the door of negotiations with the political structure of Saudi Arabia”.

Their remarks came after the Iranian seminaries held a protest rally in front of the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi embassy in Tehran on Saturday, and condemned execution of the Shiite cleric by chanting “death to al-Saud” slogans.

The Iranian foreign ministry also strongly deplored Saudi Zio-Wahhabi for killing the prominent cleric, and said the move proved the Saudi officials’ “imprudence and irresponsibility”, underlining that the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime will pay a heavy price for this crime.

“While the extremist and Takfiri terrorists have deprived the regional and world nations of security and tranquility and threaten certain regional governments’ stability and existence, execution of a figure like Sheikh Nimr who didn’t have any instrument but words to pursue his political and religious goals merely shows the depth of imprudence and irresponsibility,” Foreign Ministry Spokesman Hossein Jaber Ansari said on Saturday.

Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime executed 47 people on Saturday for terrorism, including Sheikh Nimr, the country’s Interior Ministry said in a statement. Most of those executed were said to be involved in a series of attacks carried out by Al-Qaeda between 2003 and 2006. 45 of those executed were of Saudi nationality, one Chadian, one Egyptian.

The Interior Ministry statement announcing the executions began with verses from the Quran, justifying the use of the death penalty, while state television showed footage of the aftermath of Al-Qaeda attacks over the last decade. Shortly afterward, Saudi Zio-Wahhabi Grand Mufti Sheikh Abdulaziz Al al-Sheikh appeared on Saudi Zio-Wahhabi television, hailing the executions as just.

Al-Qaeda is the number one enemy of Shiite Muslims, and the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi television did not explain how it could link the footage to the execution of a Shiite leader who has been the target of ISIL and Al-Qaeda.

Iranian high-ranking officials had regularly deplored Saudi Zio-Wahhabi for handing down death sentence to prominent Shiite cleric, warning that execution of the Sheikh Nimr would incur a heavy price in Saudi Zio-Wahhabi, and would set the stage for the fall of the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime.

Several rights activists had also warned Riyadh that execution of Sheikh Nimr would set fire to Saudi Arabia.

Heretofore, Al Saud had frequently said that it plans to execute Sheikh soon, but the kingdom delayed it every time. According to an informed source, the new King and his hawkish cabinet members mean to send a message to the Shiite community, dissidents and Iran through the move to show they are ready to pay any price in confrontation with Tehran. Though Iran has repeatedly denied any link with the Shiite dissidents in Saudi Arabia.

During the recent months, people across the world staged protest in support of Sheikh Nimr, calling for immediate release of the leader, warning the Zio-Wahhabi regime against executing prominent Shiite cleric.

Nimr was attacked and arrested in the Qatif region of Eastern Province in July 2012, and has been charged with undermining the kingdom’s security, making anti-government speeches, and defending political prisoners. Nimr has denied the accusations.

In October 2014, a Zio-Wahhabi court sentenced Sheikh Nimr to death, provoking huge condemnations and criticism in the Middle East and the world.

On October 25, Nimr’s family confirmed that the Wahhabi Supreme Court and the Specialized Appeals Court had endorsed a death sentence issued last year against him for inciting sectarian strife and disobeying King Shalom Bin Yahood. The cleric has denied the charges.

The Shiite cleric’s lawyer, Sadeq al-Jubran, had also said that Nimr could be executed as soon as the Zio-Wahhabi monarch approves his sentence.

Human rights organizations have condemned Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime for failing to address the rights situation in the kingdom. They say Zio-Wahhabi regime has persistently implemented repressive policies that stifle freedom of expression, association and assembly.

 

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Makarim Wibisono quits as UN rights monitor, saying Israel blocked access to Palestinian territories

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Image result for UN LOGO

 

Israel rejects the post of the independent investigator for the Occupied Territories, accusing the 47-country forum of bias against the Jewish state
Makarim Wibisono, from Indonesia, was appointed UN special rapporteur for Palestinian territories in 2014 AFP/Getty

The UN investigator for human rights violations in the Palestinian territories has resigned, saying that Israel had reneged on its pledge to grant him access to the West Bank and Gaza.

Makarim Wibisono said that his repeated oral and written requests for access had gone unanswered over 18 months. Announcing his resignation, Mr Wibisono voiced “deep concern at the lack of effective protection of Palestinian victims of continuing human rights violations and violations of international humanitarian law”.

Israel has long rejected the post of the independent investigator for the Occupied Territories, accusing the 47-country forum of bias against the Jewish state.

Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Emmanuel Nahshon said that the mandate given to the rapporteur is “distorted and biased” and noted Mr Wibisono wasn’t the first person to resign the post.

“Israeli human rights are violated too, every day, by Palestinians and until ignoring this ends the council will not be taken seriously,” Mr  Nahshon added.

Israel captured the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem in the 1967  war and annexed the latter. Palestinians seek a state in the West Bank and Gaza with East Jerusalem as their capital. In 2005 Israel withdrew from Gaza, which is now run by the Hamas group.

Mr Wibisono, a former Indonesian diplomat, took up the post of United Nations special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories in June 2014. In his first report to the council, in March 2015, he said Israel should investigate the killing of more than 1,500 Palestinian civilians, one-third of them children, during the 2014 Gaza war, and make the findings public.

His resignation will come into effect on 31 March, after his final report to the council. Mr Wibisono said that his efforts to fulfil his mandate were “frustrated every step of the way”, adding the Palestinian government had co-operated fully.

“I hope that whoever succeeds me will manage to resolve the current impasse, and so reassure the Palestinian people that after nearly half a century of occupation the world has not forgotten their plight,” Mr Wibisono said.

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Sunni Cleric Urges Muslims to Take Action against Zio-Wahhabi Brutalities

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Sunni Cleric Urges Muslims to Take Action against Saudi Brutalities
TEHRAN (FNA)- A senior Sunni cleric called on the world Muslims to take serious action against the Saudi government, saying that the savage actions of the despotic rulers in Riyadh can never be harness through verbal condemnation alone.

“Sufficing to the verbal condemnation of the Saudi crimes will not resolve anything, rather precise planning and serious measures are needed by the international bodies and scholars of the Muslim states to stop the al-Saud’s savagery,” Sunni scholar Sheikh Esmayeel Bazdar said on Monday in reaction to the execution of prominent Shiite cleric Nimr Baqir al-Nimr by the Saudi regime.

The senior Sunni cleric slammed Riyadh for killing Sheikh Nimr, and said, “Sheikh Nimr was only inviting the Saudi rulers to justice and democracy.”

Sheikh Bazdar urged the Muslim states to join hands against Saudi Arabia’s brutalities.

In relevant remarks earlier today, Abdel Bari Atwan, the editor-in-chief of Rai al-Youm newspaper, underlined that Sheikh Nimr’s execution and 46 other people in Saudi Arabia was a calculated move by Riyadh to increase sectarian differences among Muslims.

“Whoever took the decision for the executions was after sending a provocative message to enemies inside and outside Saudi Arabia,” Atwan wrote on Monday.

According to him, Saudi Arabia seeks to exacerbate the sectarian crisis in the region and persuade provocative acts among the Shiites and Sunnis.

Atwan said it is no coincidence that the mass execution was carried out after Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman announced the formation of a military, security and political coalition of 34 countries followed by establishment of the Turkey-Saudi Arabia strategic cooperation council.

The Saudi interior ministry announced on Saturday the execution of 47 people, including Sheikh Nimr.

After the announcement, Sunni and Shiite Muslims from across the world rushed to condemn his execution, vowing revenge.

After the declaration, thousands of Bahraini people poured to the streets and chanted “death to the al-Saud” slogans.

The Bahrainis who also carried some placards to show their support for Sheikh Nimr warned Riyadh that shedding the cleric’s blood will not remain unanswered.

Lebanon’s Hezbollah, Yemen’s Ansarullah, Pakistan’s Shiite Assembly and tens of Sunni and Shiite figures, groups and movements across the world have rushed to condemn the Saudi regime, all underlining that Riyadh has poured oil to the flames of sectarian strife.

In Palestine, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) in a statement condemned the killing of the prominent Muslim cleric, and said, “The execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr shows that Saudi Arabia insists on pouring oil to the flames of sectarian sedition.”

Sheikh Nimr’s execution was also condemned by Head of Iraq’s Badr Organization Hadi al-Ameri who expressed deep regret after hearing the news.

The Iranian Sunni figures also showed reaction to the Saudi cleric’s killing by Saudi Arabia.

Molawi Abdolhamid Ismailzehi, the Friday prayers leader of Iran’s Southeastern city of Zahedan, expressed deep regret over Sheikh Nimr’s execution, and said under the conditions that the Muslim world needs unity, the Saudi officials should have refrained from his killing.

Also, representative of Iran’s Sunni-populated Southeastern province of Sistan and Balouchestan at the Assembly of Experts, Molawi Nazir Ahmad Salami, condemned Sheikh Nimr’s execution, and said, “There is no difference between the Shiites and Sunnis and any person who is opposed to tyranny and brutality should show reaction and deplore the Saudi measure.”

Also, Chairman of the Sunni Lawmakers’ Fraction at the Iranian parliament Abed Fattahi deplored the execution of Sheikh Nimr by Riyadh, and said the bells have now started ringing for the collapse of the Saudi regime.

He also said that Saudi Arabia’s support for the terrorists, the mismanagement of Mina incident, execution of Sheikh Nimr and several other crimes by Riyadh, “closed the door of negotiations with the political structure of Saudi Arabia”.

Their remarks came after the Iranian seminaries held a protest rally in front of the Saudi embassy in Tehran on Saturday, and condemned execution of the Shiite cleric by chanting “death to al-Saud” slogans.

The Iranian foreign ministry also strongly deplored Riyadh for killing the prominent cleric, and said the move proved the Saudi officials’ “imprudence and irresponsibility”, underlining that the Saudi regime will pay a heavy price for this crime.

“While the extremist and Takfiri terrorists have deprived the regional and world nations of security and tranquility and threaten certain regional governments’ stability and existence, execution of a figure like Sheikh Nimr who didn’t have any instrument but words to pursue his political and religious goals merely shows the depth of imprudence and irresponsibility,” Jaber Ansari said on Saturday.

Saudi Arabia executed 47 people on Saturday for terrorism, including Sheikh Nimr, the country’s Interior Ministry said in a statement. Most of those executed were said to be involved in a series of attacks carried out by Al-Qaeda between 2003 and 2006. 45 of those executed were of Saudi nationality, one Chadian, one Egyptian.

The Interior Ministry statement announcing the executions began with verses from the Quran, justifying the use of the death penalty, while state television showed footage of the aftermath of Al-Qaeda attacks over the last decade. Shortly afterward, Saudi Grand Mufti Sheikh Abdulaziz Al al-Sheikh appeared on Saudi Arabian television, hailing the executions as just.

Al-Qaeda is the number one enemy of Shiite Muslims, and the Saudi television did not explain how it could link the footage to the execution of a Shiite leader who has been the target of ISIL and Al-Qaeda.

Iranian high-ranking officials had regularly deplored Riyadh for handing down death sentence to prominent Shiite cleric, warning that execution of the Sheikh Nimr would incur a heavy price in Saudi Arabia, and would set the stage for the fall of the Saudi regime.

Several rights activists had also warned Riyadh that execution of Sheikh Nimr would set fire to Saudi Arabia.

Heretofore, Al Saud had frequently said that it plans to execute Sheikh soon, but the kingdom delayed it every time. According to an informed source, the new King and his hawkish cabinet members mean to send a message to the Shiite community, dissidents and Iran through the move to show they are ready to pay any price in confrontation with Tehran. Though Iran has repeatedly denied any link with the Shiite dissidents in Saudi Arabia.

During the recent months, people across the world staged protest in support of Sheikh Nimr, calling for immediate release of the leader, warning the Wahhabi authorities against executing prominent Shiite cleric.

Nimr was attacked and arrested in the Qatif region of Eastern Province in July 2012, and has been charged with undermining the kingdom’s security, making anti-government speeches, and defending political prisoners. Nimr has denied the accusations.

In October 2014, a Saudi court sentenced Sheikh Nimr to death, provoking huge condemnations and criticism in the Middle East and the world.

On October 25, Nimr’s family confirmed that the Saudi Supreme Court and the Specialized Appeals Court had endorsed a death sentence issued last year against him for inciting sectarian strife and disobeying King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. The cleric has denied the charges.

The Shiite cleric’s lawyer, Sadeq al-Jubran, had also said that Nimr could be executed as soon as the Saudi monarch approves his sentence.

Human rights organizations have condemned Saudi Arabia for failing to address the rights situation in the kingdom. They say Saudi Arabia has persistently implemented repressive policies that stifle freedom of expression, association and assembly.

 

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Saudi Journalist: Sheikh Nimr’s Execution Shows Depth of Wahhabi Foolishness

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Saudi Journalist: Sheikh Nimr's Execution Shows Depth of Riyadh's Foolishness
TEHRAN (FNA)- A renowned journalist and political analyst blasted the Riyadh government’s suppression of the people living under the kingdom’s rule, and said the execution of prominent Shiite cleric Nimr Baqir al-Nimr was the most stupid action the Saudi government could do to pave the way for its collapse.

“What the Saudi government has done against Sheikh Nimr is like political suicide and such foolish acts will bring the Al Saud closer to its collapse,” Saudi journalist Ali Al Qarash told FNA on Monday.

He reiterated that the Saudi regime is a Takfiri system that pursues the worst inhumane methods to crack down on its opponents and critics.

Qarash said that Sheikh Nimr’s execution is good evidence that Saudi Arabia should be overthrown.

The Saudi journalist noted that the Saudi courts lack transparency and judicial independence and only serve the Riyadh despotic rulers.

Earlier today, hundreds of Saudi people protesting against the Riyadh government’s execution of prominent Shiite cleric Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr in the Eastern part of the kingdom called for the downfall of the Al Saud dynasty.

Large groups of angry protesters chanted slogans such as “Down with Al Saud” in the village of Awamiyah in Qatif region, and underlined their resolve to overthrow the Saudi regime, FNA dispatches said.

They condemned the execution of Sheikh Nimr and suppression of the Shiite minority by the Riyadh government.

The call by protesters for Al Saud’s overthrow came as Saudi Arabia’s police killed a young man and injured another civilian during popular protests in Qatif region in the Eastern part of the kingdom to condemn Sheikh Nimr’s execution by the Riyadh government.

Ali Omran al-Dawood was killed when the Saudi police started shooting at the protesters in the village of Awamiyah in Qatif region.

An eight-year-old boy was also injured during the police shootout.

Large groups of protesters were also beaten and arrested as security forces surrounded a group of young Saudis who were burning tires in protest at Sheikh Nimr’s execution.

Saudi Arabia announced Saturday that it has executed the prominent Shiite Muslim cleric.

Sunni and Shiite Muslims from across the world rushed to condemn his execution, vowing revenge.

Saudi people still continue protest rallies in different parts of the kingdom’s Eastern province of Qatif, specially Awamiyah and Qatif towns, to condemn execution prominent cleric Sheikh Nimr Baqir al-Nimr and suppression of the Shiite minority.

Field sources from Awamiyah and Qatif said that the two regions are in a state of war with hundreds of Saudi army troops deployed in streets.

The Saudi troops have so far made tens of arrests, while local residents say protesters are beaten, arrested and shot at.

The angry people set fire to a police center, several military vehicles and a bus in Qatif.

Also on Anizah al-Badaya road near al-Qassim city, a 29-year-old man ran over a Saudi security force and killed him.

After the declaration, thousands of Bahraini people poured to the streets and chanted “death to the al-Saud” slogans.

The Bahrainis who also carried some placards to show their support for Sheikh Nimr warned Riyadh that shedding the cleric’s blood will not remain unanswered.

Lebanon’s Hezbollah, Yemen’s Ansarullah, Pakistan’s Shiite Assembly and tens of Sunni and Shiite figures, groups and movements across the world have rushed to condemn the Saudi regime, all underlining that Riyadh has poured oil to the flames of sectarian strife.

In Palestine, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) in a statement condemned the killing of the prominent Muslim cleric, and said, “The execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr shows that Saudi Arabia insists on pouring oil to the flames of sectarian sedition.”

Sheikh Nimr’s execution was also condemned by Head of Iraq’s Badr Organization Hadi al-Ameri who expressed deep regret after hearing the news.

The Iranian Sunni figures also showed reaction to the Saudi cleric’s killing by Saudi Arabia.

Molawi Abdolhamid Ismailzehi, the Friday prayers leader of Iran’s Southeastern city of Zahedan, expressed deep regret over Sheikh Nimr’s execution, and said under the conditions that the Muslim world needs unity, the Saudi officials should have refrained from his killing.

Also, representative of Iran’s Sunni-populated Southeastern province of Sistan and Balouchestan at the Assembly of Experts, Molawi Nazir Ahmad Salami, condemned Sheikh Nimr’s execution, and said, “There is no difference between the Shiites and Sunnis and any person who is opposed to tyranny and brutality should show reaction and deplore the Saudi measure.”

Also, Chairman of the Sunni Lawmakers’ Fraction at the Iranian parliament Abed Fattahi deplored the execution of Sheikh Nimr by Riyadh, and said the bells have now started ringing for the collapse of the Saudi regime.

He also said that Saudi Arabia’s support for the terrorists, the mismanagement of Mina incident, execution of Sheikh Nimr and several other crimes by Riyadh, “closed the door of negotiations with the political structure of Saudi Arabia”.

Their remarks came after the Iranian seminaries held a protest rally in front of the Saudi embassy in Tehran on Saturday, and condemned execution of the Shiite cleric by chanting “death to al-Saud” slogans.

The Iranian foreign ministry also strongly deplored Riyadh for killing the prominent cleric, and said the move proved the Saudi officials’ “imprudence and irresponsibility”, underlining that the Saudi regime will pay a heavy price for this crime.

“While the extremist and Takfiri terrorists have deprived the regional and world nations of security and tranquility and threaten certain regional governments’ stability and existence, execution of a figure like Sheikh Nimr who didn’t have any instrument but words to pursue his political and religious goals merely shows the depth of imprudence and irresponsibility,” Foreign Ministry Spokesman Hossein Jaber Ansari said on Saturday.

Saudi Arabia executed 47 people on Saturday for terrorism, including Sheikh Nimr, the country’s Interior Ministry said in a statement. Most of those executed were said to be involved in a series of attacks carried out by Al-Qaeda between 2003 and 2006. 45 of those executed were of Saudi nationality, one Chadian, one Egyptian.

The Interior Ministry statement announcing the executions began with verses from the Quran, justifying the use of the death penalty, while state television showed footage of the aftermath of Al-Qaeda attacks over the last decade. Shortly afterward, Saudi Grand Mufti Sheikh Abdulaziz Al al-Sheikh appeared on Saudi Arabian television, hailing the executions as just.

Al-Qaeda is the number one enemy of Shiite Muslims, and the Saudi television did not explain how it could link the footage to the execution of a Shiite leader who has been the target of ISIL and Al-Qaeda.

Iranian high-ranking officials had regularly deplored Riyadh for handing down death sentence to prominent Shiite cleric, warning that execution of the Sheikh Nimr would incur a heavy price in Saudi Arabia, and would set the stage for the fall of the Saudi regime.

Several rights activists had also warned Riyadh that execution of Sheikh Nimr would set fire to Saudi Arabia.

Heretofore, Al Saud had frequently said that it plans to execute Sheikh soon, but the kingdom delayed it every time. According to an informed source, the new King and his hawkish cabinet members mean to send a message to the Shiite community, dissidents and Iran through the move to show they are ready to pay any price in confrontation with Tehran. Though Iran has repeatedly denied any link with the Shiite dissidents in Saudi Arabia.

During the recent months, people across the world staged protest in support of Sheikh Nimr, calling for immediate release of the leader, warning the Wahhabi authorities against executing prominent Shiite cleric.

Nimr was attacked and arrested in the Qatif region of Eastern Province in July 2012, and has been charged with undermining the kingdom’s security, making anti-government speeches, and defending political prisoners. Nimr has denied the accusations.

In October 2014, a Saudi court sentenced Sheikh Nimr to death, provoking huge condemnations and criticism in the Middle East and the world.

On October 25, Nimr’s family confirmed that the Saudi Supreme Court and the Specialized Appeals Court had endorsed a death sentence issued last year against him for inciting sectarian strife and disobeying King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud. The cleric has denied the charges.

The Shiite cleric’s lawyer, Sadeq al-Jubran, had also said that Nimr could be executed as soon as the Saudi monarch approves his sentence.

Human rights organizations have condemned Saudi Arabia for failing to address the rights situation in the kingdom. They say Saudi Arabia has persistently implemented repressive policies that stifle freedom of expression, association and assembly.

 

Posted in Saudi ArabiaComments Off on Saudi Journalist: Sheikh Nimr’s Execution Shows Depth of Wahhabi Foolishness

Good Riddance: Nervous as Hell Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime Calls It Quits in Tehran

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Good Riddance: Nervous as Hell Riyadh Calls It Quits in Tehran
TEHRAN (FNA)- The ISIL-like execution of top Shia cleric Nimr al-Nimr along with 46 others has fuelled a lot of anger across the globe.

Facing public protests, Riyadh, the terrorist capital of the planet, has been forced to severe ties with Tehran, with Iraqi officials suggesting the recently reopened Baghdad embassy is now unwelcome. US Administration officials have also expressed “deep concerns” about the executions, and the possibility that the new tensions between Riyadh and Tehran would impact the ongoing ISIL war. Few points are worth mentioning in this respect:

* By calling it quits in Tehran, the House of Saud cannot cover up its foolish mistake of executing Sheikh Nimr. By executing innocent political activists Riyadh cannot hide its human rights violations and crimes against humanity in Yemen, Syria and Iraq either. Everyone in the entire world knows that Riyadh made ISIL’s entry on the regional stage. Simply put, they have lost the proxy war on Iran and they are desperate to make a come back.

* The murder of Sheikh Nimr was a deliberate provocation. It’s part of Riyadh’s efforts to divert attention from its domestic problems. Further, it is designed to benefit Riyadh and ISIL by exacerbating tensions between Sunnis and Shias. This is while the Russian-led counter-ISIL alliance of Iran, Syria, Iraq and Lebanon’s Hezbollah is not about sectarianism. Indeed, Wahhabi-Takfiri terrorism AND ISIL’s utter depravity have nothing to do with Islam.

* Western governments have not responded to the killing by their number one arms purchaser. The European Union’s chief diplomat Federica Mogherini did, however, declared the killing to raise “serious concerns regarding freedom of expression”. This is while by generously backing various terrorist groups to establish a Salafist principality in Syria, the Saudis and their spawns are up to their eyeballs in terror and human rights violations. The West must not turn a blind eye to such atrocities and must urgently appeal to the United Nations Security Council to take action.

* Using petro-dollar cash, the same regime which has funded, armed and trained narrow minded zealots also sits on the UN Human Rights Council, which is absurd and laughable. Instead, the Saudis, who have sown the seeds of tumult in the Middle East and helped give birth to mindless fanaticism and beheadings, suicide bombings and other forms of savage brutality, should face war crimes charges in The Hague.

One thing is for sure though: The Saudis are losing the proxy war against Iran, and their diplomatic tactics and provocative executions aren’t working. Their agents of destruction are also getting beaten quite badly by the new counter-terror alliance in Syria. Which is why they are nervous as hell and have moved on to Plan B – a diplomatic strategy for producing the ultimate “Shia-Sunni War” to improve their chances for success in round two through the Crisis-Escalation policy.

To be sure, as the growing international ire reminds us, their new strategy is, ultimately, bound to fail. Both Sunni and Shia communities are not going to let Riyadh’s new charade drive a wedge between them that, the Saudis hope, will leave Sunni Muslims nowhere to go but into their clutches that explains why we see people from across the religious spectrum are out in the streets from New York to London to condemn the Al-Saud for all its savage acts and barbaric policies. We should never forget that while a majority of the Palestinians are Sunnis, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine was among the first to rush to condemn the Saudi regime for executing Shiites’ Sheikh Nimr, the most vocal critic of the Wahhabi despots in Riyadh.

In practical terms, people have taken to the streets to condemn the latest provocative executions as they are not going to let the House of Saud and its agents of destruction – which are an extension of the US-Israeli will – decide the future of the region. That has to be decided by the people of the region themselves, both Shia and Sunni, which is what international law AND Sharia Law are all about: Advocating peace and security, the rule of law, interfaith dialog, and peaceful coexistence.

 

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S. Nasrallah: Al Saud Dynasty Imposed Itself on Arabian Peninsula via Massacres

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Mohamed Salami
Sayyed NasrallahHezbollah Secretary General Sayyed Hasan Nasrallah asserted that the execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr underlines Al Saud’s terrorist arrogance and insistence on murdering all who speak out truth and right, offering condolences and congratulations to martyr Sheikh Nimr’s family and all the locals of Qatif and the Eastern Province in Saudi for the martyrdom “which is the legacy of the prophets.”In a speech during Hezbollah ceremony to mourn and honor Sheikh Mohammad Khatoun, Sayyed Nasrallah said that in the Arabian Peninsula a state was established and falsely named Saudi Arabia, noting that it is the land of the Two Holy Mosques, Islam, the first Mujahidin, the Prophet and His Family (P) and that Al Saud dynasty, as history documents, imposed itself on it via massacres, intimidation and terrorism.Sayyed Nasrallah added that with respect to Al Saud, clerics, whether they are Shiites or Sunnites, cannot express their reform stances and that they get murdered in case they reject the ruling regime’s actions.In this context, Sayyed Nasrallah considered that the execution of Sheikh Nimr is a serious crime committed by Al Saud, pointing out that the martyr used to speak out right peacefully, not violently.”Sheikh Nimr’s blood will plague Al Saud till the Day of Resurrection.”

“The corrupted Saudi court, where the defense lawyer cannot argue with the judge, failed to prove that Sheikh Nimr held weaponry since he was peaceful as all the clerics in the Eastern Province in Saudi and in Bahrain.”

His eminence mentioned that Sheikh Nimr demanded courageously and clearly the Saudi regime to grant the people their rights and freedom, adding that who speaks out gets executed in Saudi which claims to be defending freedom in the region.

“Why did Saudi insist on executing Sheikh Nimr at this time? Why did it ignore all the pleads submitted by Sunnite and Shiite clerics to refrain from implementing the decision?” Sayyed Nasrallah asked.

“In fact, the execution sends a clear message that the Saudi regime does not care for Islamic and the international public opinion and for hundreds of Millions of Sheikh Nimr’s lovers who would be hurt by his execution,” Sayyed Nasrallah explained, “Al Saud are also explicitly telling people that they can either live under the dictatorship of the royal family or to suffer all sorts of misery, including death.”

Hezbollah leader stressed also that the Saudi regime executed Sheikh Nimr to get more involved in its scheme of stirring seditions among the Muslims and to maintain that it follows the path of bloodshed, not that of the rational dialogue.

“Shia Muslims must be aware so that they do not fall in the trap of seditions as only Al Saud, not the Sunnites killed Sheikh Nimr.”

“The United Sates proposed to the Shia scholar in Saudi to grant them an autonomous ruling system in the Eastern Province where most of the Saudi oil resources exist, but they rejected,” Sayyed Nasrallah revealed.

“The Saudi regime is responsible for all the seditions in the Islamic world, including syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Indonesia, etc,” Sayyed Nasrallah maintained

The execution of Sheikh Nimr clearly tells those who are betting on a moderate voice in the Saudi regime that it will launch the destructive wars in approaching all the issues but never run  constructive dialogues, Sayyed Nasrallah confirmed.

His eminence affirmed that the Saudi regime, via this crime, revealed to the world its real face of takfiri, criminal terrorism as it rejects that any one exposes its oppression and criminality within the kingdom and in Yemen.

A spirit of revenge and hatred, not a political decision, was behind the Saudi war on Yemen, Sayyed Nasrallah added.

“Saudi wants to punish and destroy the entire Yemen for rejecting its oppression. It does not care for the identity of the president, but for his degree of loyalty to its torturing policy.”

“The Saudi regime does not want to end the war on Yemen, even if ISIL or Qaeda ruled that country.”

Hezbollah Secretary General wondered whether it is high time to say that the terrorist groups are mere agents funded and supported by the Saudi regime, explaining that ISIL and Saudi use similar books in their religious curricula.

“Is not it high time to say courageously and regardless of all scores that the principle and spirit of the takfiri thought which destroys, murders, commits massacres and threatens the whole world is produced by Al Saud?”

Sayyed Nasrallah went on to say that Al Saud dynasty is involved in the  bloodshed which prevails in several Arab and Muslim countries, asking: “Is not it high time to speak out right before the tyrant which is destroying Islam and the Islamic Umma? Is not it high time to expel the Saudi regime which violates the human rights? Is not it high time to speak out about the services provided by Al Saud to Britain in its efforts to strike the Palestinian cause?”

In line with the stance of Sayyeda Zainab (P) before Yazid, Sayyed Nasrallah highlighted that the response to the Saudi crime is to speak out right, adding that bloodshed will lead Al Saud dynasty to its downfall as history teaches us.

Eulogizing Sheikh Khatoun
Sayyed Nasrallah

Hezbollah Secretary General reiterated his deep condolences to Sheikh Mohammad Ali Khatoun’s family for the loss of the honorable cleric who was a member of Hezbollah Central Council and spent most of his lifetime in his scholarly and jihadi work.

Sayyed Nasrallah said that Sheikh Khatoun was among those who joined the military resistance since its inception, adding that his eminence spent most of his life as a Mujahid and a religious preacher who lectures people on various religious and political subjects.

Sayyed Nasrallah described Sheikh Khatoun was modest, pious and easygoing and that he used to have the same character traits of former Hezbollah SG martyr Secretary General Sayyed Abbas al-Moussawi.

Sayyed Nasrallah stressed that Hezbollah moral and jihadi spirit has attained and all the victories, and that none can affect the party’s power, reputation and achievements.

With the bless of Sheikh Khatoun and all the martyrs, Hezbollah will always be victorious, Sayyed Nasrallah asserted.

Confirming that Hezbollah will respond to the Israeli crime of assassinating martyr Samir Kuntar, Sayyed Nasrallah concluded by saying that the Zionists must keep afraid of the resistance threat.

The memorial service which was held by Hezbollah on Sunday in Beirut’s Dahiyeh was started by a recitation of Holy Quranic verses and displaying a short video about Sheikh Khatoun’s life before his eminence’s brother delivered a speech on behalf of his family.

Posted in Lebanon, Saudi ArabiaComments Off on S. Nasrallah: Al Saud Dynasty Imposed Itself on Arabian Peninsula via Massacres

Bahrain: Zio-Wahhabi regime detains Shia cleric for protesting Nimr killing

NOVANEWS

Image result for KING Bahrain CARTOON

 

Zio-Wahhabi forces have reportedly detained another Shia cleric following protests in the tiny Persian Gulf Arab country against Saudi Zio-Wahhabi recent execution of prominent Shia clergyman Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr.

According to the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, Sheikh Ahmad al-Jidhafsi was arrested on Sunday after he attended protest rallies against Nimr’s execution.

Bahraini opposition group ‘February 14 Revolution Youth Coalition’ has slammed the cleric’s arrest as heinous, saying Manama is after sparking sectarianism and a religious conflict.

In December 2014, the Bahraini Zio-Wahhabi regime also took into custody prominent Shia cleric and opposition leader, Sheikh Ali Salman.

Sheikh Salman, the head of al-Wefaq National Islamic Society, was arrested shortly after he called for serious political reforms in Bahrain following his re-election as the secretary general of al-Wefaq, Bahrain’s main opposition bloc.

The charges brought against him include “incitement to promote the change of the political system by force, threats and other illegal means,” among others. However, the 49-year-old has strongly denied the charges, emphasizing that he has been seeking reforms in the kingdom through peaceful means.

Meanwhile, the Bahrain Zio-Wahhabi Interior Ministry said in a Sunday statement that the country’s security forces detained an unspecified number of people protesting Sheikh Nimr’s execution over social media posts.

The Zio-Wahhabi regime in Bahrain has warned of criminal prosecution against those protesting the execution of Sheik Nimr.

On Saturday, the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi Interior Ministry announced that Sheikh Nimr had been put to death along with 46 others who were convicted of being involved in “terrorism.”

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The Economy in 2016: On the Edge of Recession

NOVANEWS

 

Editorial Cartoons on the Sony Hack

By: Robert Reich

Economic forecasters exist to make astrologers look good, but I’ll hazard a guess. I expect the U.S. economy to sputter in 2016. That’s because the economy faces a deep structural problem: not enough demand for all the goods and services it’s capable of producing.

American consumers account for almost 70 percent of economic activity, but they won’t have enough purchasing power in 2016 to keep the economy going on more than two cylinders. Blame widening inequality.

Consider: The median wage is 4 percent below what it was in 2000, adjusted for inflation. The median wage of young people, even those with college degrees, is also dropping, adjusted for inflation. That means a continued slowdown in the rate of family formation—more young people living at home and deferring marriage and children – and less demand for goods and services.

At the same time, the labor participation rate—the percentage of Americans of working age who have jobs—remains near a 40-year low.

The giant boomer generation won’t and can’t take up the slack. Boomers haven’t saved nearly enough for retirement, so they’re being forced to cut back expenditures.

Exports won’t make up for this deficiency in demand. To the contrary, Europe remains in or close to recession, China’s growth is slowing dramatically, Japan is still on its back, and most developing countries are in the doldrums.

Business investment won’t save the day, either. Without enough customers, businesses won’t step up investment. Add in uncertainties about the future—including who will become president, the makeup of the next Congress, the Middle East, and even the possibilities of domestic terrorism—and I wouldn’t be surprised if business investment declined in 2016.

I’d feel more optimistic if I thought government was ready to spring into action to stimulate demand, but the opposite is true. The Federal Reserve has started to raise interest rates—spooked by an inflationary ghost that shows no sign of appearing. And Congress, notwithstanding its end-of-year tax-cutting binge, is still in the thralls of austerity economics.

Chances are, therefore, the next president will inherit an economy teetering on the edge of recession.

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At Stake in 2016: Ending the Vicious Cycle of Wealth and Power

NOVANEWS

By: Robert Reich

What’s at stake this election year? Let me put as directly as I can.

America has succumbed to a vicious cycle in which great wealth translates into political power, which generates even more wealth, and even more power.

This spiral is most apparent is declining tax rates on corporations and on top personal incomes (much in the form of wider tax loopholes), along with a profusion of government bailouts and subsidies (to Wall Street bankers, hedge-fund partners, oil companies, casino tycoons, and giant agribusiness owners, among others).

The vicious cycle of wealth and power is less apparent, but even more significant, in economic rules that now favor the wealthy.

Billionaires like Donald Trump can use bankruptcy to escape debts but average people can’t get relief from burdensome mortgage or student debt payments.

Giant corporations can amass market power without facing antitrust lawsuits (think Internet cable companies, Monsanto, Big Pharma, consolidations of health insurers and of health care corporations, Dow and DuPont, and the growing dominance of Amazon, Apple, and Google, for example).

But average workers have lost the market power that came from joining together in unions.

It’s now easier for Wall Street insiders to profit from confidential information unavailable to small investors.

It’s also easier for giant firms to extend the length of patents and copyrights, thereby pushing up prices on everything from pharmaceuticals to Walt Disney merchandise.

And easier for big corporations to wangle trade treaties that protect their foreign assets but not the jobs or incomes of American workers.

It’s easier for giant military contractors to secure huge appropriations for unnecessary weapons, and to keep the war machine going.

The result of this vicious cycle is a disenfranchisement of most Americans, and a giant upward distribution of income from the middle class and poor to the wealthy and powerful.

Another consequence is growing anger and frustration felt by people who are working harder than ever but getting nowhere, accompanied by deepening cynicism about our democracy.

The way to end this vicious cycle is to reduce the huge accumulations of wealth that fuel it, and get big money out of politics.

But it’s chicken-and-egg problem. How can this be accomplished when wealth and power are compounding at the top?

Only through a political movement such as America had a century ago when progressives reclaimed our economy and democracy from the robber barons of the first Gilded Age.

That was when Wisconsin’s “fighting Bob” La Follette instituted the nation’s first minimum wage law; presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan attacked the big railroads, giant banks, and insurance companies; and President Teddy Roosevelt busted up the giant trusts.

When suffragettes like Susan B. Anthony secured women the right to vote, reformers like Jane Addams got laws protecting children and the public’s health, and organizers like Mary Harris “Mother” Jones spearheaded labor unions.

America enacted a progressive income tax, limited corporate campaign contributions, ensured the safety and purity of food and drugs, and even invented the public high school.

The progressive era welled up in the last decade of the nineteenth century because millions of Americans saw that wealth and power at the top were undermining American democracy and stacking the economic deck. Millions of Americans overcame their cynicism and began to mobilize.

We may have reached that tipping point again.

Both the Occupy Movement and the Tea Party grew out of revulsion at the Wall Street bailout. Consider, more recently, the fight for a higher minimum wage (“Fight for 15”).

Bernie Sander’s presidential campaign is part of this mobilization. (Donald Trump bastardized version draws on the same anger and frustration but has descended into bigotry and xenophobia.)

Surely 2016 is a critical year. But, as the reformers of the Progressive Era understood more than a century ago, no single president or any other politician can accomplish what’s needed because a system caught in the spiral of wealth and power cannot be reformed from within. It can be changed only by a mass movement of citizens pushing from the outside.

So regardless of who wins the presidency in November and which party dominates the next Congress, it is up to the rest of us to continue to organize and mobilize. Real reform will require many years of hard work from millions of us.

As we learned in the last progressive era, this is the only way the vicious cycle of wealth and power can be reversed.

Posted in USAComments Off on At Stake in 2016: Ending the Vicious Cycle of Wealth and Power

Of Rotten Apples and Rotten Systems

NOVANEWS

rotten apple isolated on a white background - stock photo

 

Martin Shkreli, the former hedge-fund manager turned pharmaceutical CEO who was arrested last week, has been described as a sociopath and worse.

In reality, he’s a brasher and larger version of what others in finance and corporate suites do all the time.

Federal prosecutors are charging him with conning wealthy investors.

Lying to investors is illegal, of course, but it’s perfectly normal to use hype to lure rich investors into hedge funds. And the line between the two isn’t always distinct.

Hedge funds are lightly regulated on the assumption that investors are sophisticated and can take care of themselves.

Perhaps prosecutors went after Shkreli because they couldn’t nail him for his escapades as a pharmaceutical executive, which were completely legal – although vile.

Shkreli took over a company with the rights to a 62-year-old drug used to treat toxoplasmosis, a devastating parasitic infection that can cause brain damage in babies and people with AIDS. He then promptly raised its price from $13.50 to $750 a pill.

When the media and politicians went after him, Shkreli was defiant, saying “our shareholders expect us to make as much as money as possible.” He said he wished he had raised the price even higher.

That was too much even for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, Big Pharma’s trade group, which complained indignantly that Shkreli’s company was just an investment vehicle “masquerading as a pharmaceutical company.

Maybe Big Pharma doesn’t want to admit most pharmaceutical companies have become investment vehicles. If they didn’t deliver for their investors they’d be taken over by “activist” investors and private-equity partners who would.

The hypocrisy is stunning. Just three years ago, Forbes Magazine praised Shkreli as one of its “30 under 30 in Finance” who was “battling billionaires and entrenched drug industry executives.”

Last month, Shkreli got control of a company with rights to a cheap drug used for decades to treat Chagas’ disease in Latin America. His aim was to get the drug approved in the United States and charge tens of thousands of dollars for a course of treatment.

Investors who backed Shkreli in this venture did well. The company’s share price initially shot up from under $2 to more than $40.

While other pharmaceutical companies don’t raise their drug prices fiftyfold in one fell swoop, as did Shkreli, they would if they thought it would lead to fat profits.

Most have been increasing their prices more than 10 percent a year – still far faster than inflation – on drugs used on common diseases like cancer, high cholesterol, and diabetes.

This has imposed a far bigger burden on health spending than Shkreli’s escapades, making it much harder for Americans to pay for drugs they need. Even if they’re insured, most people are paying out big sums in co-payments and deductibles.

Not to mention the impact on private insurers, Medicare, state Medicaid, prisons and the Veterans Health Administration.

And the prices of new drugs are sky-high. Pfizer’s new one to treat advanced breast cancer costs $9,850 a month.

According to an analysis by the Wall Street Journal, that price isn’t based on manufacturing or research costs.

Instead, Pfizer set the price as high as possible without pushing doctors and insurers toward alternative drugs.

But don’t all profit-maximizing firms set prices as high as they can without pushing customers toward alternatives?

Unlike most other countries, the United States doesn’t control drug prices. It leaves pricing up to the market.

Which enables drug companies to charge as much as the market will bear.

So what, exactly, did Martin Shkreli do wrong, by the standards of today’s capitalism?

He played the same game many others are playing on Wall Street and in corporate suites. He was just more audacious about it.

It’s easy to go after bad guys, much harder to go after bad systems.

Hedge fund managers, for example, make big gains from trading on insider information. That robs small investors who aren’t privy to the information.

But it’s not illegal unless a trader knows the leaker was compensated – a looser standard than in any other advanced country.

Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical industry is making a fortune off average Americans, who are paying more for the drugs they need than the citizens of any other advanced country.

That’s largely because Big Pharma has wielded its political influence to avoid cost controls, to ban Medicare from using its bargaining clout to negotiate lower prices, and to allow drug companies to pay the makers of generic drugs to delay their cheaper versions.

Shkreli may be a rotten apple. But hedge funds and the pharmaceutical industry are two rotten systems that are costing Americans a bundle.

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