Archive | September 8th, 2019

Battle for Amulsar: UK Mining Giant Using Corporate Courts to Attack Community Opposed to Massive Gold Mine

This is the sinister mechanism known as ISDS in action—holding a sovereign government to ransom until it betrays the desires and rights of its own people

byTJ Chuah

Local opponents to the Amulsar gold mining project in Armenia have been protesting the operation and blockading access to the site. (Photo: TJ Chua / War on Want)

Local opponents to the Amulsar gold mining project in Armenia have been protesting the operation and blockading access to the site. (Photo: TJ Chuah / War on Want)

Early last week—despite popular resistance and grave environmental concerns—the Armenian government green-lit a gold mine on Amulsar Mountain in Southern Armenia.

The new Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan, who steered the movement that brought about Armenia’s ‘Velvet Revolution,’ appears to have bowed to pressure from mining firm Lydian International, including the threat of a $2 billion lawsuit in a ‘corporate court.’ But the grassroots resistance is determined to hold strong and continue blocking construction. Will the government remove protestors and clear the path for Lydian? The answer will show the strength of Armenia’s new democracy.

Two months ago I travelled to Amulsar to meet with and interview the communities at the center of resistance against the gold mine, which was set to open on their doorstep. The community fear that the mine will destroy their environment, landscape and their jobs. They’re right to be worried; the area around Amulsar is one of astounding beauty, the economy of the nearby spa town of Jermuk relies on the purity of the mountain’s mineral water, and even the start of construction activities decimated local livestock. Amulsar is at the heart of Armenia’s water supply, so any potential mining disaster would have grave repercussions far beyond the immediate area.

“Essentially Lydian is using corporate courts to bully the Armenian government into taking a more repressive approach to public protest.”UK-registered mining company Lydian was given the go-ahead for the gold mine by the previous Armenian government, even though the communities most likely to be affected had expressed longstanding concerns. That government was an authoritarian administration with a track record of police violence and repression of public protest. Then in 2018, Armenia had a ‘Velvet Revolution’ and a new democratic government was formed. The communities around Amulsar felt they had a chance to make their voices heard. Protests began, ultimately leading to the blockade.

For an entire year, people from the town and villages next to Amulsar have blockaded the entry roads to the mine and have succeeded in completely shutting down construction. This was made possible thanks to the efforts of the entire community—from those living for months at a time at the blockade sites, to the shopkeepers sending food and supplies. Environmental activists along with the local community had been campaigning around Amulsar before this and faced police repression, but since the revolution, this peaceful protest has been allowed to continue without any violence or repression from the authorities.

However, this amazing act of resistance came under threat earlier this year when Lydian threatened to sue the government in corporate courts, also known as Investor State Dispute Settlements (ISDS)—a lesser known feature of modern trade deals that place an unbelievable amount of power and control into the hands of corporations. These corporate courts allow companies to sue states for decisions that reduce projected profits, so Lydian based the challenge on the government’s ‘failure’ to remove the protest blockades, using both a UK–Armenia and Canada–Armenia investment deal, asking for a pay-out equivalent to two thirds of Armenia’s annual budget. 

Essentially Lydian is using corporate courts to bully the Armenian government into taking a more repressive approach to public protest. 

Now that the Armenian government has caved to corporate pressure and given the go-ahead to the mine, there’s a real risk that it will move to remove the local protestors.

This is corporate courts in action—holding the government to ransom until it backs down. What is on the table is billions in compensation. It sounds like a kind of Kafkaesque situation, and it is. The Armenian government is right to be worried—these corporate courts have been successfully used to strip billions from the public purse of governments that could really do with that money to spend on much needed public services.  This is why campaigning against corporate courts is so important.

We need to tell Lydian to drop the corporate court case and respect the wishes of the local communities.

Note: The film War on Want produced, More precious than gold: community resistance v corporate courts, highlights the struggle of the community, and the concerns of environmental experts, showing that the case against the mine is compelling.

Posted in UKComments Off on Battle for Amulsar: UK Mining Giant Using Corporate Courts to Attack Community Opposed to Massive Gold Mine

This Is an Anti-Parliamentary Coup—and An Internationally–Organised One

For Trump, No Deal is imperative; a key step towards a vassal Britain, subject to his rules on everything from health to cars to food.

byDiane Abbott

It is our job as the Labour party to ensure that we prevent the huge damage to the living standards and well-being of the ordinary people of this country that Trump, Johnson and No Deal will inflict. (Photo: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

It is our job as the Labour party to ensure that we prevent the huge damage to the living standards and well-being of the ordinary people of this country that Trump, Johnson and No Deal will inflict. (Photo: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

round the world, coups are normally international events. Short of war they have been a preferred mechanism to achieve what has become known as ‘regime change’. And the last time there was a successful coup in this country in 1688 that too was an international affair, with Mary and William of Orange being installed as a monarchy. That was a coup by parliament against an over-bearing monarchy.

The current situation is quite different. We are living through a coup against parliament by a minority of parliamentarians, who have seized control of the Tory party from the right. They intend to impose their will against the majority of elected representatives and against the will of the public.

They are able to attempt this because this too is an international affair. Boris Johnson hopes to prolong his premiership but crashing this country out of the EU with a No Deal Brexit. But the key beneficiary of this project is Donald Trump and the interests he represents, and the project has his full backing.

Any significant agreement with the EU would necessarily include some degree of alignment with European rules and tariffs. They are not going to formulate an entirely new set of rules and tariffs simply to accommodate us – any more than the US will. For Trump, No Deal is imperative.

The effect of those US rules and tariffs are truly frightening. Contrary to the false promises and blatant untruths of the leaders of the Leave campaigns, we will not be entering a new golden age of peace and prosperity as a subordinate state to Trump’s MAGA project. This is not what the millions of decent Leave voters were told.

On trade, you only have recognise how he treats US allies, like Canada, Mexico, India and the EU, to understand how trade negotiations will go. It will be an imposition not a negotiation. Similarly, it is clear Trump will drag this country into new conflicts, with countries such as Iran and China. Some in the Tory party are only too eager to follow him.

Being Trump’s vassal will affect every part of our lives, from the Americanisation of the NHS, to the decimation of the car industry, the assault on British farming and much else besides. American workers have even fewer rights and benefits than workers in this country, and there will be a major offensive to ‘level down’ our rights. Donald Trump is also a climate crisis denier, and seems sure to insist on greater fracking by US firms.

In opposing No Deal the majority of MPs are in tune with the voters. Poll after poll shows only a small minority support No Deal. The general public have asked themselves, will I be better or worse off with No Deal? And they don’t like the answer.

The arguments of coup plotters are clearly false. They deliberately confuse suspending parliament for weeks with an ordinary recess while knowing the opponents of No Deal intended to get parliament to sit and debate instead of going into recess. They claim a ‘new government’ needs its own Queen’s Speech, when it current has no programme except No Deal. They claim to relish the prospect of a general election, when Johnson could have called one when he ousted May.

Boris Johnson also previously told the One Nation group he had no intention of proroguing parliament. Now he is telling them that he is still aiming for a deal with the EU. The truth is Trump will not allow that, and his puppet Farage recently repeated his threat to stand against the Tories if Johnson fails to deliver No Deal. That would prove fatal to Johnson’s lifelong ambitions, and he would be forever known as Boris the Brief.

It is our job as the Labour party to ensure that we prevent the huge damage to the living standards and well-being of the ordinary people of this country that Trump, Johnson and No Deal will inflict. Jeremy Corbyn is doing a brilliant job in uniting the entire opposition to those plans. Parliament has not yet been prorogued, and can prevent it. I would simply invite anyone who prefers our current democracy to arbitrary rule in Trump’s interests to join us in opposing the coup and opposing No Deal.

Posted in UKComments Off on This Is an Anti-Parliamentary Coup—and An Internationally–Organised One

After Man Serves 35 Years in Prison for $50 Robbery, US ‘Should Be Ashamed of System We Allow’

“Wealthy CEOs and business executives steal millions of dollars from the public and never go to jail.”

byAndrea Germanos,

hands in cuffs

“Bless Alvin Kennard,” Ava Duvernay wrote on Twitter this week. “Everyone in this country should be ashamed of the system we allow.” (Photo: Derek Goulet/cc/flickr)

The failures of the nation’s justice system were highlighted this week after a judge resentenced a man—who’d been serving life in prison without a chance of parole for a $50.75 bakery robbery—to time served.

Alvin Kennard had already served over 35 years for the 1983 first degree robbery when Judge David Carpenter on Wednesday cut the life sentence short. Kennard is expected to be released in the coming days after processing by the Alabama Board of Corrections.

Author and CNN commentator Keith Boykin weighed in on the case and the disparate hands of justice, writing on Twitter Thursday, “Wealthy CEOs and business executives steal millions of dollars from the public and never go to jail.”

As Al.com reported,

Under Alabama’s Habitual Felony Offender Act, then 22-year-old Kennard was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. When he was 18, Kennard had been charged with burglary, grand larceny, and receiving stolen property in connection with a break-in at an unoccupied service station. He pleaded guilty to three counts of second-degree burglary for that crime in 1979, and was given a suspended sentence of three years on probation.

Those prior crimes, which were not Class A felonies, led to his sentence under the Habitual Felony Offender Act in 1984.

While that “three strikes” law has been changed to allow a fourth time offender the possibility of parole, as ABC News reported, it had no retroactive effect on those already imprisoned under it. Kennard’s upcoming freedom is instead thanks to Carpenter noticing the case. Carla Crowder, Kennard’s attorney, told the news outlet, “This was a judge that kind of went out of his way.”

The case drew the attention of acclaimed filmmaker Ava Duvernay, who said on Twitter Thursday: “Bless Alvin Kennard. Everyone in this country should be ashamed of the system we allow.”

Duvernay’s comment came in response to a thread from Birmingham, Alabama-based journalist Beth Shelburne in which she called the previous three strikes law “merciless.”

“It was extraordinary to see this wrong made right, but it only happened because the right system actors were in place,” Shelburne wrote. “I hope Alabama leaders have the courage to grant the same chance to the 500+ others like Alvin who remain locked up with no hope of release.”

Crowder, in her comments to ABC News, made similar points.

While welcoming Kennard’s upcoming release, Crowder said that “we know that there are hundreds of similarly situated incarcerated people in the state who don’t have attorneys, who don’t have a voice.”

“As this state grapples with the Department of Justice involvement and unconstitutional prisons,” she added, “I would hope our lawmakers, our courts, and our governor would do more to address these injustices.”

Kennard, for his part, said in court Wednesday, “I just want to say I’m sorry for what I did.”

“I take responsibility for what I did in the past,” he said. “I want the opportunity to get it right.”

Posted in USAComments Off on After Man Serves 35 Years in Prison for $50 Robbery, US ‘Should Be Ashamed of System We Allow’

Call the crime in Kashmir by its name: Ongoing genocide

  1. Binish AhmedPhD candidate,
  2. Public Policy, Ryerson University

Disclosure statement

Binish Ahmed does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Ryerson University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation CA.

Ryerson University provides funding as a member of The Conversation CA-FR.

The Conversation UK receives funding from these organisations

View the full list

We believe in the free flow of information

Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence.Republish this article

The Kashmir conflict, referred to as a “territorial dispute,” has been central to tense relations in Asia for more than 70 years, particularly between the two nuclear powers of India and Pakistan.

Tensions have escalated between the countries many times in the past and have sometimes resulted in military confrontation.

Kashmiris are an Indigenous people living under colonial occupation who have been fighting for their right to practise sovereignty through self-determination and self-government. Multiple colonial borders run through the Kashmiri peoples’ territories (Indian, Pakistani and Chinese), separating families and friends.

Kashmir is the most militarized region in the world, with more than half a million armed Indian troops deployed in the Indian-administered Kashmir over the past 30 years.

They are occupying Kashmir through use of colonial war measures acts, including the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, the Public Safety Act and martial laws that have given Indian troops complete impunity.

Gross human rights violations have occurred under their watch, according to a 2018 United Nations report. They include gang rapes by military and mass disappearances of approximately 8,000 to 10,000 people. As many as 100,000 Kashmiris have been killed and several thousand wounded, blinded and maimed, including through torture tactics in custody

As a result of the war, hundreds of thousands of Kashmiri (Muslims, as well as Sikhs and Pandits) have left Kashmir, and become internationally displaced and dispossessed following the 72-year Indian occupation.

India’s latest invasion

On Aug. 4, India ordered all tourists and outside students to leave Kashmir effective immediately. They simultaneously implemented emergency measures to protect tourists and Indian Hindu yathris doing an annual Hindu pilgrimage. It also airlifted almost 10,000 more soldiers into Kashmir within a matter of two days.

Approximately 28,000 additional armed troops then invaded Kashmir Valley in trucks and tanks.

On Aug. 5, the Indian Home Minister Amit Shah told parliament that the president had signed a decree abolishing Section 35a and Article 370 of the Indian constitution.


Read more: India revokes Kashmir’s autonomy, risking yet another war with Pakistan


The Indian government eliminated Kashmir’s special status in an effort to assimilate the Kashmiri people, extinguish their unique Indigenous title to land and claim their land as federal territory. This obliterated any last set of rights Kashmiris enjoyed as a semi-autonomous people in the Indian union of states.

Jammu and Kashmir State has been bifurcated into an Indian federal union territory.

A mountain view overlooking the Kashmir Valley. Binish Ahmed, Author provided (No reuse)

These unilateral moves by the Indian state obliterate the rights Kashmiris had as citizens of India as well as their Indigenous rights. Under the United Nations Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP), India is obligated to ensure decisions pertaining to Kashmiri are made with them, using the principle of Free, Prior, Informed Consent (FPIC) that recognizes Kashmiris as a sovereign Indigenous people.

The UNDRIP was adopted and signed by India, China and Pakistan in 2007.

Millions under house arrest

Since Aug. 4, India has eliminated all access to and communication with Kashmir. The internet, mobile and landlines have been severed, and 14.7 million people have no access to essentials like food and medical support while Indian advances to take full control of their land using military power.

Aside from extremely rare media, Kashmiris have not been able to communicate with each other or with the outside world. The entire Jammu and Kashmir region is essentially imprisoned under house arrest.

Since 1949, Article 370 has granted the state of Jammu and Kashmir semi-autonomous constitutional status. Under its provisions, the region has its own legislative assembly, constitution, flag and independence in all matters except communications, foreign affairs and defence.

Revoking this status is the latest attempt to annihilate the Kashmiri people, extinguish their rights and eliminate their linguistic, social, cultural, economic and political existence as Indigenous people. The legality of dissolving the special status is being challenged by India’s legal and constitutional experts, and goes against the country’s Supreme Court rulings of recent years.

With these recent changes to Article 370 and Section 35a, India permits the permanent settlement of non-Kashmiris in Kashmiri land. Membership and settlement had previously been determined by the Kashmiri constitution. Non-Kashmiris are now allowed to purchase, acquire and permanently settle on land in Kashmir.

Under these changes, the Gujjar-Bakarwal people in Kashmir, for example, are immediately at greater risk. They migrate seasonally with animals on pastoral grounds, caring for both the animals and the land. India’s laws concerning land as individual property will not permit them to continue living on the land as they’ve historically done.

The Gujjar-Bakarwals are seen in this 2004 photo taken in Kashmir. CC BY-NC

These changes will also result in a reconfiguration of the population in Kashmir. Kashmiris have long speculated that India intends to settle military and paramilitary families in Kashmir. As a Kashmiri, I have personally already seen semi-permanent military colonies in Kashmir.

Using an Indigenous framework

Indigenous peoples in Asia like the Kashmiri have long faced threats to their existence and their inherent rights, particularly “relational” land rights, as colonizing relations between Indigenous peoples and settler nations make land encroachment profitable and treat Indigenous lives as disposable.

Media, academics, legal and policy analysts barely touch on Indigenous rights, as outlined in the UNDRIP, when discussing Kashmir. But the Indigenous rights framework is necessary to accurately assess the distinct set of rights abuses Kashmiris face. India is in violation of multiple international human rights conventions and declarations it’s signed that apply to Kashmir.

Under UNDRIP, India is obligated to consult with Indigenous people rather than make decisions that impact them unilaterally, and to grant them the greatest possible opportunity for self-government and self-determination.

This right of Kashmiris to determine their future was also affirmed by a UN resolution on Kashmir in 1948. But this resolution limited self-determination to a decision on whether to accede to India or Pakistan.

There has been a reluctance to use the term genocide to describe the events that have unfolded in Kashmir over the decades.

In this May 2018 photo, supporters of separatist People’s Political Party (PPP) Leader Hilal Ahmad War hold banners and shout slogans during a protest against the visit of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Srinagar in Indian-controlled Kashmir. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

But the legal definition of genocide fits. The Kashmiri people have been targeted for a demographic transformation on their territory by an outsider group by introducing mass permanent settlements of outsiders. The outsider group is the Hindu nationalist Indian state under the leadership of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), and Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Targeted for being Muslim

As a group, Kashmiris are additionally being targeted because they are predominantly Muslim as well as culturally and linguistically distinct. Muslims are treated as threats in India, including in Kashmir. They have been targeted for elimination in part through military force and economic oppression.

Kashmiri youth have been criminalized and put into state custody for “reform” programming for throwing stones to protest the injustices they face and the impunity of the Indian military. This treatment is a violation of the UN Convention on the Rights of a Child.

Refusal to call out genocide has happened before, in Nazi Germany, Rwanda and elsewhere. The United Nations Convention on Genocide states that it must never be permitted again. The convention also states that at-risk groups must be protected.

Instead, there has been an eerie silence from world leaders on naming the unfolding crime in Kashmir.

Kashmiris have been the guardians, gardeners and caretakers of Kashmiri land, water, each other and non-human life. Regardless of colonial borders, what is most fundamental is what Kashmiris, as a sovereign Indigenous people, want.

According to a popular Kashmiri protest chant that has reverberated through Kashmiri history:

“Jis Kashmir ko khoon se seencha! Woh Kashmir hamara hai!” “The Kashmir that has been drenched in our blood! It belongs to us, the Kashmiris!”

Call the crime in Kashmir by its name: Ongoing genocide

August 8, 2019 10.04pm BST

Author

  1. Binish AhmedPhD candidate, Public Policy, Ryerson University

Disclosure statement

Binish Ahmed does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

Ryerson University

Ryerson University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation CA.

Ryerson University provides funding as a member of The Conversation CA-FR.

The Conversation UK receives funding from these organisations

View the full list

We believe in the free flow of information

Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence.Republish this article

The Kashmir conflict, referred to as a “territorial dispute,” has been central to tense relations in Asia for more than 70 years, particularly between the two nuclear powers of India and Pakistan.

Tensions have escalated between the countries many times in the past and have sometimes resulted in military confrontation.

Kashmiris are an Indigenous people living under colonial occupation who have been fighting for their right to practise sovereignty through self-determination and self-government. Multiple colonial borders run through the Kashmiri peoples’ territories (Indian, Pakistani and Chinese), separating families and friends.

Kashmir is the most militarized region in the world, with more than half a million armed Indian troops deployed in the Indian-administered Kashmir over the past 30 years.

They are occupying Kashmir through use of colonial war measures acts, including the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, the Public Safety Act and martial laws that have given Indian troops complete impunity.

Gross human rights violations have occurred under their watch, according to a 2018 United Nations report. They include gang rapes by military and mass disappearances of approximately 8,000 to 10,000 people. As many as 100,000 Kashmiris have been killed and several thousand wounded, blinded and maimed, including through torture tactics in custody

As a result of the war, hundreds of thousands of Kashmiri (Muslims, as well as Sikhs and Pandits) have left Kashmir, and become internationally displaced and dispossessed following the 72-year Indian occupation.

India’s latest invasion

On Aug. 4, India ordered all tourists and outside students to leave Kashmir effective immediately. They simultaneously implemented emergency measures to protect tourists and Indian Hindu yathris doing an annual Hindu pilgrimage. It also airlifted almost 10,000 more soldiers into Kashmir within a matter of two days.

Approximately 28,000 additional armed troops then invaded Kashmir Valley in trucks and tanks.

On Aug. 5, the Indian Home Minister Amit Shah told parliament that the president had signed a decree abolishing Section 35a and Article 370 of the Indian constitution.


Read more: India revokes Kashmir’s autonomy, risking yet another war with Pakistan


The Indian government eliminated Kashmir’s special status in an effort to assimilate the Kashmiri people, extinguish their unique Indigenous title to land and claim their land as federal territory. This obliterated any last set of rights Kashmiris enjoyed as a semi-autonomous people in the Indian union of states.

Jammu and Kashmir State has been bifurcated into an Indian federal union territory.

A mountain view overlooking the Kashmir Valley. Binish Ahmed, Author provided (No reuse)

These unilateral moves by the Indian state obliterate the rights Kashmiris had as citizens of India as well as their Indigenous rights. Under the United Nations Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP), India is obligated to ensure decisions pertaining to Kashmiri are made with them, using the principle of Free, Prior, Informed Consent (FPIC) that recognizes Kashmiris as a sovereign Indigenous people.

The UNDRIP was adopted and signed by India, China and Pakistan in 2007.

Millions under house arrest

Since Aug. 4, India has eliminated all access to and communication with Kashmir. The internet, mobile and landlines have been severed, and 14.7 million people have no access to essentials like food and medical support while Indian advances to take full control of their land using military power.

Aside from extremely rare media, Kashmiris have not been able to communicate with each other or with the outside world. The entire Jammu and Kashmir region is essentially imprisoned under house arrest.

Since 1949, Article 370 has granted the state of Jammu and Kashmir semi-autonomous constitutional status. Under its provisions, the region has its own legislative assembly, constitution, flag and independence in all matters except communications, foreign affairs and defence.

Revoking this status is the latest attempt to annihilate the Kashmiri people, extinguish their rights and eliminate their linguistic, social, cultural, economic and political existence as Indigenous people. The legality of dissolving the special status is being challenged by India’s legal and constitutional experts, and goes against the country’s Supreme Court rulings of recent years.

With these recent changes to Article 370 and Section 35a, India permits the permanent settlement of non-Kashmiris in Kashmiri land. Membership and settlement had previously been determined by the Kashmiri constitution. Non-Kashmiris are now allowed to purchase, acquire and permanently settle on land in Kashmir.

Under these changes, the Gujjar-Bakarwal people in Kashmir, for example, are immediately at greater risk. They migrate seasonally with animals on pastoral grounds, caring for both the animals and the land. India’s laws concerning land as individual property will not permit them to continue living on the land as they’ve historically done.

The Gujjar-Bakarwals are seen in this 2004 photo taken in Kashmir. CC BY-NC

These changes will also result in a reconfiguration of the population in Kashmir. Kashmiris have long speculated that India intends to settle military and paramilitary families in Kashmir. As a Kashmiri, I have personally already seen semi-permanent military colonies in Kashmir.

Using an Indigenous framework

Indigenous peoples in Asia like the Kashmiri have long faced threats to their existence and their inherent rights, particularly “relational” land rights, as colonizing relations between Indigenous peoples and settler nations make land encroachment profitable and treat Indigenous lives as disposable.

Media, academics, legal and policy analysts barely touch on Indigenous rights, as outlined in the UNDRIP, when discussing Kashmir. But the Indigenous rights framework is necessary to accurately assess the distinct set of rights abuses Kashmiris face. India is in violation of multiple international human rights conventions and declarations it’s signed that apply to Kashmir.

Under UNDRIP, India is obligated to consult with Indigenous people rather than make decisions that impact them unilaterally, and to grant them the greatest possible opportunity for self-government and self-determination.

This right of Kashmiris to determine their future was also affirmed by a UN resolution on Kashmir in 1948. But this resolution limited self-determination to a decision on whether to accede to India or Pakistan.

There has been a reluctance to use the term genocide to describe the events that have unfolded in Kashmir over the decades.

In this May 2018 photo, supporters of separatist People’s Political Party (PPP) Leader Hilal Ahmad War hold banners and shout slogans during a protest against the visit of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Srinagar in Indian-controlled Kashmir. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

But the legal definition of genocide fits. The Kashmiri people have been targeted for a demographic transformation on their territory by an outsider group by introducing mass permanent settlements of outsiders. The outsider group is the Hindu nationalist Indian state under the leadership of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), and Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Targeted for being Muslim

As a group, Kashmiris are additionally being targeted because they are predominantly Muslim as well as culturally and linguistically distinct. Muslims are treated as threats in India, including in Kashmir. They have been targeted for elimination in part through military force and economic oppression.

Kashmiri youth have been criminalized and put into state custody for “reform” programming for throwing stones to protest the injustices they face and the impunity of the Indian military. This treatment is a violation of the UN Convention on the Rights of a Child.

Refusal to call out genocide has happened before, in Nazi Germany, Rwanda and elsewhere. The United Nations Convention on Genocide states that it must never be permitted again. The convention also states that at-risk groups must be protected.

Instead, there has been an eerie silence from world leaders on naming the unfolding crime in Kashmir.

Kashmiris have been the guardians, gardeners and caretakers of Kashmiri land, water, each other and non-human life. Regardless of colonial borders, what is most fundamental is what Kashmiris, as a sovereign Indigenous people, want.

According to a popular Kashmiri protest chant that has reverberated through Kashmiri history:

“Jis Kashmir ko khoon se seencha! Woh Kashmir hamara hai!” “The Kashmir that has been drenched in our blood! It belongs to us, the Kashmiris!”

An Indian paramilitary soldier checks the bag of a Kashmiri man during curfew in Srinagar, Indian-controlled Kashmir. The lives of millions in India’s only Muslim-majority region have been upended recently. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

  1. Binish Ahmed PhD candidate,
  2. Public Policy, Ryerson University

Disclosure statement

Binish Ahmed does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Ryerson University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation CA.

Ryerson University provides funding as a member of The Conversation CA-FR.

The Conversation UK receives funding from these organisations

The Kashmir conflict, referred to as a “territorial dispute,” has been central to tense relations in Asia for more than 70 years, particularly between the two nuclear powers of India and Pakistan.

Tensions have escalated between the countries many times in the past and have sometimes resulted in military confrontation.

Kashmiris are an Indigenous people living under colonial occupation who have been fighting for their right to practise sovereignty through self-determination and self-government. Multiple colonial borders run through the Kashmiri peoples’ territories (Indian, Pakistani and Chinese), separating families and friends.

Kashmir is the most militarized region in the world, with more than half a million armed Indian troops deployed in the Indian-administered Kashmir over the past 30 years.

They are occupying Kashmir through use of colonial war measures acts, including the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, the Public Safety Act and martial laws that have given Indian troops complete impunity.

Gross human rights violations have occurred under their watch, according to a 2018 United Nations report. They include gang rapes by military and mass disappearances of approximately 8,000 to 10,000 people. As many as 100,000 Kashmiris have been killed and several thousand wounded, blinded and maimed, including through torture tactics in custody

As a result of the war, hundreds of thousands of Kashmiri (Muslims, as well as Sikhs and Pandits) have left Kashmir, and become internationally displaced and dispossessed following the 72-year Indian occupation.

India’s latest invasion

On Aug. 4, India ordered all tourists and outside students to leave Kashmir effective immediately. They simultaneously implemented emergency measures to protect tourists and Indian Hindu yathris doing an annual Hindu pilgrimage. It also airlifted almost 10,000 more soldiers into Kashmir within a matter of two days.

Approximately 28,000 additional armed troops then invaded Kashmir Valley in trucks and tanks.

On Aug. 5, the Indian Home Minister Amit Shah told parliament that the president had signed a decree abolishing Section 35a and Article 370 of the Indian constitution.


Read more: India revokes Kashmir’s autonomy, risking yet another war with Pakistan


The Indian government eliminated Kashmir’s special status in an effort to assimilate the Kashmiri people, extinguish their unique Indigenous title to land and claim their land as federal territory. This obliterated any last set of rights Kashmiris enjoyed as a semi-autonomous people in the Indian union of states.

Jammu and Kashmir State has been bifurcated into an Indian federal union territory.

A mountain view overlooking the Kashmir Valley. Binish Ahmed, Author provided (No reuse)

These unilateral moves by the Indian state obliterate the rights Kashmiris had as citizens of India as well as their Indigenous rights. Under the United Nations Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP), India is obligated to ensure decisions pertaining to Kashmiri are made with them, using the principle of Free, Prior, Informed Consent (FPIC) that recognizes Kashmiris as a sovereign Indigenous people.

The UNDRIP was adopted and signed by India, China and Pakistan in 2007.

Millions under house arrest

Since Aug. 4, India has eliminated all access to and communication with Kashmir. The internet, mobile and landlines have been severed, and 14.7 million people have no access to essentials like food and medical support while Indian advances to take full control of their land using military power.

Aside from extremely rare media, Kashmiris have not been able to communicate with each other or with the outside world. The entire Jammu and Kashmir region is essentially imprisoned under house arrest.

Since 1949, Article 370 has granted the state of Jammu and Kashmir semi-autonomous constitutional status. Under its provisions, the region has its own legislative assembly, constitution, flag and independence in all matters except communications, foreign affairs and defence.

Revoking this status is the latest attempt to annihilate the Kashmiri people, extinguish their rights and eliminate their linguistic, social, cultural, economic and political existence as Indigenous people. The legality of dissolving the special status is being challenged by India’s legal and constitutional experts, and goes against the country’s Supreme Court rulings of recent years.

With these recent changes to Article 370 and Section 35a, India permits the permanent settlement of non-Kashmiris in Kashmiri land. Membership and settlement had previously been determined by the Kashmiri constitution. Non-Kashmiris are now allowed to purchase, acquire and permanently settle on land in Kashmir.

Under these changes, the Gujjar-Bakarwal people in Kashmir, for example, are immediately at greater risk. They migrate seasonally with animals on pastoral grounds, caring for both the animals and the land. India’s laws concerning land as individual property will not permit them to continue living on the land as they’ve historically done.

The Gujjar-Bakarwals are seen in this 2004 photo taken in Kashmir. CC BY-NC

These changes will also result in a reconfiguration of the population in Kashmir. Kashmiris have long speculated that India intends to settle military and paramilitary families in Kashmir. As a Kashmiri, I have personally already seen semi-permanent military colonies in Kashmir.

Using an Indigenous framework

Indigenous peoples in Asia like the Kashmiri have long faced threats to their existence and their inherent rights, particularly “relational” land rights, as colonizing relations between Indigenous peoples and settler nations make land encroachment profitable and treat Indigenous lives as disposable.

Media, academics, legal and policy analysts barely touch on Indigenous rights, as outlined in the UNDRIP, when discussing Kashmir. But the Indigenous rights framework is necessary to accurately assess the distinct set of rights abuses Kashmiris face. India is in violation of multiple international human rights conventions and declarations it’s signed that apply to Kashmir.

Under UNDRIP, India is obligated to consult with Indigenous people rather than make decisions that impact them unilaterally, and to grant them the greatest possible opportunity for self-government and self-determination.

This right of Kashmiris to determine their future was also affirmed by a UN resolution on Kashmir in 1948. But this resolution limited self-determination to a decision on whether to accede to India or Pakistan.

There has been a reluctance to use the term genocide to describe the events that have unfolded in Kashmir over the decades.

In this May 2018 photo, supporters of separatist People’s Political Party (PPP) Leader Hilal Ahmad War hold banners and shout slogans during a protest against the visit of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Srinagar in Indian-controlled Kashmir. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

But the legal definition of genocide fits. The Kashmiri people have been targeted for a demographic transformation on their territory by an outsider group by introducing mass permanent settlements of outsiders. The outsider group is the Hindu nationalist Indian state under the leadership of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), and Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Targeted for being Muslim

As a group, Kashmiris are additionally being targeted because they are predominantly Muslim as well as culturally and linguistically distinct. Muslims are treated as threats in India, including in Kashmir. They have been targeted for elimination in part through military force and economic oppression.

Kashmiri youth have been criminalized and put into state custody for “reform” programming for throwing stones to protest the injustices they face and the impunity of the Indian military. This treatment is a violation of the UN Convention on the Rights of a Child.

Refusal to call out genocide has happened before, in Nazi Germany, Rwanda and elsewhere. The United Nations Convention on Genocide states that it must never be permitted again. The convention also states that at-risk groups must be protected.

Instead, there has been an eerie silence from world leaders on naming the unfolding crime in Kashmir.

Kashmiris have been the guardians, gardeners and caretakers of Kashmiri land, water, each other and non-human life. Regardless of colonial borders, what is most fundamental is what Kashmiris, as a sovereign Indigenous people, want.

According to a popular Kashmiri protest chant that has reverberated through Kashmiri history:

“Jis Kashmir ko khoon se seencha! Woh Kashmir hamara hai!” “The Kashmir that has been drenched in our blood! It belongs to us, the Kashmiris!”

Posted in India, Pakistan & KashmirComments Off on Call the crime in Kashmir by its name: Ongoing genocide

Palestine: After suffering with the disease .. Sayeh prisoner martyr

the tourist

By: Sammi Ibrahem,Sr

The Nazi camp Service announced on Sunday, the death of the prisoner Bassam Sayeh inside the hospital, “Assaf Harovi”.

He was suffering from bone cancer, acute leukemia, myocardial insufficiency up to 80%, acute and chronic lung inflammation, and other health problems .

Nazi army arrested Sayeh on 8 October 2015, while he was going to attend a hearing of his wife, who was then detained.

He was charged with “involvement in the killing of an Nazi officer and his wife” near the village of Beit Furik east of Nablus in the northern West Bank, days before his arrest.

It is noteworthy that some (700) prisoners are suffering from difficult health conditions, of which about (160) prisoners need to be followed up with vigorous medical care..

Posted in Palestine Affairs, ZIO-NAZI, Human RightsComments Off on Palestine: After suffering with the disease .. Sayeh prisoner martyr

9/11, Drug Money, Oil Resources and the Invasion of Afghanistan: Michael Ruppert Refutes the Official 9/11 Story

The March 2002 Roundtable, Featuring Mike Ruppert. Conversation on Canadian TV.

By Michael Welch and Michael Ruppert

Global Research,

“What I’m saying … is that the Bush Administration knew the attacks were going to take place, and made a conscious decision that the casualty levels were acceptable to secure access to Central Asian oil for the major oil companies and for the U.S. economy, and to secure control of the drug trade.”

– Michael C. Ruppert, March 14, 2002 roundtable (from this week’s program.)

LISTEN TO THE SHOW

Click to download the audio (MP3 format)

As Canadian journalist and media critic Barrie Zwicker explained in his 2006 book Towers of Deception: The Media Cover-up of 9/11, mainstream journalists throughout Canada and the Western world failed spectacularly in their role to critically examine the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001 and its consequences. [1]

Pertinent questions as to ulterior motives for a deadly military invasion of Afghanistan, or about the failure to scramble military aircraft to intercept the hijacked airplanes when they veered off course were never asked in the prominent newspapers, television networks and other major media organs of the day. Any skeptical inquiry of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the months immediately following the attacks was confined to ‘limited hang-outs’ along the lines of the CIA ‘never getting its act together’ and ‘controversies’ about the crime possibly being ‘blow-back’ from America’s oppressive policies in the Middle East and elsewhere. [2]

One national broadcaster in Canada, however, proved to be an exception to this trend. VISION TV is a Canadian cable and satellite specialty channel based in Toronto reaching an estimated 10 million homes. It was largely due to Zwicker’s influence as VISION TV’s resident media critic that the provocative discussion featured on this week’s show ever made it to the public airwaves.

On the evening of March 14, 2002, the network broadcast a round table on the 2001 terrorist attacks on a special installment of VisionTV Insight: Mediafile. This discussion would include one of the few appearances in Canadian media by U.S. based investigative journalist Michael C. Ruppert.

Ruppert was, along with Professor Michel Chossudovsky of the Centre for Research on Globalization, one of the very first figures in the world to intelligently refute the official story of the September 11th attacks. He had outlined his key arguments in a hard hitting monthly newsletter called From The Wilderness, as well as on his online site fromthewilderness.com. He had also given a series of talks across the United States and Canada detailing his problems with the official story.

The conversation featured in this week’s Global Research News Hour radio program as it debuts its eighth regular broadcast season sees Ruppert face critical, albeit respectful push-back from at least two of the panelists. The discussion delved not only into the unanswered questions mentioned above, but also put them into the context of America’s imperial conquest of oil resources, and the role of drug money, including the proceeds of Afghanistan’s illicit opium trade, in financing the global economy. Questions relating to the vulnerability of Canadian sovereignty, the anti-democratic nature of ‘anti-terrorism’ legislation, and the role of journalists in the face of these developments likewise rise to the fore.

The audio of this conversation and video of the discussion had been discarded by the network years ago, and has since been recovered and restored. The show is being rebroadcast on the Global Research News Hour radio program with the full consent of VISION TV, whom we warmly thank for their generosity in this regard.

An online link to some of the recovered video footage of the conversation can be found here or watch right below.

Screenshot of March 2002 programme 

Michael Craig Ruppert (1951-2014) is a former investigative journalist and the publisher/editor of the now defunct From The Wilderness newsletter and website. A former LAPD officer and CIA whistle-blower, Ruppert had broken numerous stories related to government corruption, illegal U.S. covert operations, the reality and impact of Peak Oil, and perhaps most famously, the evidence of U.S. conscious complicity in the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. He is author of the Crossing the Rubicon: The Decline of the American Empire at the End of the Age of Oil (2004) and A Presidential Energy Policy: Twenty-five Points Addressing the Siamese Twins of Energy and Money (2009) which was reworked into a follow-up volume Confronting Collapse: The Crisis of Energy and Money in a Post Peak Oil World (2009). Ruppert was featured in the 2009 documentary film Collapse and hosted The LifeBoat Hour on the Progressive Radio Network until his tragic death by suicide in April 2014. Ruppert is a past guest of this radio program and has had articles re-posted to Global Research. A complete archive of his FTW articles can be found at FromTheWilderness.net.

Peter Hullett Desbarats, OC. (1933-2014) was a Canadian author, journalist and playwright. From 1981 to 1997 he served as the Dean of Journalism at the University of Western Ontario. He also served as one of the commissioners of the Somalia Inquiry convened to investigate Canadian military violence against Somalian civilians in the early 1990s.

Ronald George Atkey, PC, QC. (1942-2017) was a lawyer, law professor and former Canadian Federal cabinet minister. From 1984 to 1989 he served as Chairman of Canada’s Security Intelligence Review Committee which oversaw the activities of the newly established Canadian Security Intelligence Service. A lecturer on national security law and international terrorism, he was appointed Amicus Curiae to the Arar Commission in 2004, where he played a role testing government requests made on the grounds of national security confidentiality.

Phyllis Creighton is an award-winning peace campaigner having been active with many justice and peace organizations over the course of 3 decades, including Science for Peace, Project Ploughshares, Canadian Voice of Women for Peace, the International Peace Bureau and the Toronto Raging Grannies. She is also an ethicist who has served on the Health Canada board on reproductive technologies.

Rita Shelton Deverell, C.M., Ed.D. is a theatre artist, playwright, independent television producer/director, a founder of and executive producer with Vision TV, and was the first woman to lead a journalism program in Canada as acting Director of the University of Regina’s Journalism School in the 1980s. A former occupant of Nancy’s Chair in Women’s Studies at Mount St. Vincent University, her many honours include two Geminis, the Black Women’s Civic Engagement Leadership Award, and membership in the Canadian Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. She is also recipient of the 2005 Order of Canada.

Be sure to check out Global Research’s dossier on 9/11:

THE 9/11 READER. The September 11, 2001 Terror Attacks 

(Global Research News Hour Episode 267)

LISTEN TO THE SHOW

Click to download the audio (MP3 format)

The Global Research News Hour airs every Friday at 1pm CT on CKUW 95.9FM out of the University of Winnipeg. The programme is also podcast at globalresearch.ca .

The Global Research News Hour now airs Fridays at 6pm PST, 8pm CST and 9pm EST on Alternative Current Radio (alternativecurrentradio.com)

Community Radio Stations carrying the Global Research News Hour:

CHLY 101.7fm in Nanaimo, B.C – Thursdays at 1pm PT

Port Perry Radio in Port Perry, Ontario –1  Thursdays at 1pm ET

Burnaby Radio Station CJSF out of Simon Fraser University. 90.1FM to most of Greater Vancouver, from Langley to Point Grey and from the North Shore to the US Border.

It is also available on 93.9 FM cable in the communities of SFU, Burnaby, New Westminister, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey and Delta, in British Columbia, Canada. – Tune in  at its new time – Wednesdays at 4pm PT.

Radio station CFUV 101.9FM based at the University of Victoria airs the Global Research News Hour every Sunday from 7 to 8am PT.

CORTES COMMUNITY RADIO CKTZ  89.5 out of Manson’s Landing, B.C airs the show Tuesday mornings at 10am Pacific time.

Cowichan Valley Community Radio CICV 98.7 FM serving the Cowichan Lake area of Vancouver Island, BC airs the program Thursdays at 6am pacific time.

Campus and community radio CFMH 107.3fm in  Saint John, N.B. airs the Global Research News Hour Fridays at 10am.

Caper Radio CJBU 107.3FM in Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia airs the Global Research News Hour starting Wednesday Morning from 8:00 to 9:00am. Find more details at www.caperradio.ca

RIOT RADIO, the visual radio station based out of Durham College in Oshawa, Ontario has begun airing the Global Research News Hour on an occasional basis. Tune in at dcstudentsinc.ca/services/riot-radio/

Radio Fanshawe: Fanshawe’s 106.9 The X (CIXX-FM) out of London, Ontario airs the Global Research News Hour Sundays at 6am with an encore at 3pm.

Los Angeles, California based Thepowerofvoices.com airs the Global Research News Hour every Monday from 6-7pm Pacific time.

Notes: 

  1. Barrie Zwicker (2006), ‘Towers of Deception: The Media Cover-Up of 9/11’, pg. 141-178
  2. ibid., 161

Posted in USAComments Off on 9/11, Drug Money, Oil Resources and the Invasion of Afghanistan: Michael Ruppert Refutes the Official 9/11 Story

Anti-Zionist Jews are ‘as deeply opposed to Jewish interests as our enemies’

Bari Weiss

Philip Weiss 

Bari Weiss, right, and Batya Ungar-Sargon, l, at a panel on American Jews and Israel last year in NY. Yair Rosenberg is between them. Israeli flag in background. Screenshot.

We have repeatedly pointed out that New York Times opinion editor Bari Weiss demands loyalty of American Jews to Israel on Zionist principle: we are one Jewish people, and the Jewish state reestablished Jewish sovereignty after the millennia. Her expectation is not so different from that of Donald Trump, who has said that Jews who vote Democrat are being “disloyal” to Israel.

Weiss’s new book, “How to Fight Anti-Semitism,” presses the point by attacking anti-Zionist Jews as enemies of the Jewish people, according to excerpts posted by cartoonist Eli Valley and the book’s publisher at Amazon.

Anti-Zionism is not just anti-Semitism because of current reality. Anti-Zionism is also anti-Semitism because of history… As many well-intentioned people look to understand why a very small but very vocal group of Jews seems as deeply opposed to Jewish interests as many of our community’s enemies, these Jews ought to be understood in context, as part of a long history of leftwing anti-Semitic movements that successfully conscript Jews as agents in their own destruction.

Weiss lumps these anti-Zionist Jews in with Stalinist Jews and other disloyals. “Whereas Jews once had to convert to Christianity, now they have to convert to anti-Zionism,” she writes.

Once again, this is Zionist doctrine. To be Jewish in the 20th/21st century means to support Israel. Weiss’s idea of “Jewish interests” is a familiar loyalty oath re Israel. Here is Irving Kristol on Jewish interests 46 years ago, very much in the same mode:

Senator [George] McGovern is very sincere when he says that he will try to cut the military budget by 30%. And this is to drive a knife in the heart of Israel… Jews don’t like big military budgets. But it is now an interest of the Jews to have a large and powerful military establishment in the United States.

Eli Valley tweets,

@bariweiss ‘s lies about the Jewish left—that we’re ignorant of our history, that we’re not motivated by Jewish values, that we’re concerned simply w/social acceptance—are an obscene replay of Trump’s antisemitic “disloyalty” trope. That it’s hyped by the Forward is astounding.

Valley refers to Batya Ungar-Sargon of the Forward. She has been promoting Bari Weiss’s book, and herself has sought to marginalize anti-Zionists as a lunatic fringe.

I think 95 percent of the American Jewish community is pro Israel. We are all still pro Israel. What we are not is willing to give it unconditional support… You can be pro Israel and criticize Israel, that is what it means to be an American Jew. We are no longer willing to give unconditional support.

Ungar-Sargon has herself posted excerpts from Bari Weiss’s book containing criticisms of the anti-Zionist left.  “It’s true that anti-Semitism on the left isn’t actively threatening Jewish lives. Instead it demands that Jews renounce other Jews/Jewish history or face moral condemnation in progressive spaces,” Ungar-Sargon writes. 

Passage from Bari Weiss’s forthcoming book on Anti-Semitism. Posted by Batya Ungar-Sargon

Passage from Bari Weiss’s new book, posted by Batya Ungar-Sargon.

“So now anti-semitism can be about hurting certain people’s feelings,” Scott Roth has remarked.

Will Menaker jibes: “It’s complicated and truly hard to say which is worse: being killed or having to face any criticism of Israel at all ever.”

Mairav Zonszein cites Weiss’s book in a tweet about the new definition of anti-Semitism: “I think it’s fair to say this is war.” And if it is, how many anti-Zionists have platforms in the mainstream media? Zero. So it’s a generational war of social media voices versus entitled establishment voices, on one of the great ideological issues of the day, Is Zionism a failure?

Thanks to Donald Johnson.

Posted in Palestine Affairs, ZIO-NAZIComments Off on Anti-Zionist Jews are ‘as deeply opposed to Jewish interests as our enemies’

Nazi occupation arrested 15 Palestinians, including school children

52

By: Sammi Ibrahem,Sr

The Nazi occupation forces launched a campaign of arrests in several cities in the occupied West Bank targeting 15 Palestinians at dawn on Monday.

Local sources said that the Nazi occupation forces opened fire on Palestinians in the town of Beit Rima northwest of Ramallah, wounding a student with a rubber-coated metal bullet in the neck.

The Nazi occupation forces also arrested three children while they were going to their schools during the raid, and arrested six young men from Silwad and Al-Mazra’a east of Ramallah.

According to local sources, the Nazi occupation forces arrested Khalil Hassan Hamed, Mousa Yasser Al-Najjar, Noman Saleh Hamed, Mohammed Lotfi Hamed and Mohammed Yasser Hamed after they raided and searched their homes in Silwad.

Also in Ramallah, the Israeli occupation forces arrested the freed prisoner Mahmoud Mohammed policeman after they raided his house in the village of Al-Mazra’a Al-Sharqiya.

In Hebron, Nazi occupation forces arrested Laith Yousef Abdel-Hadi Asafra and Mohammed Jihad Asafra, from Beit Kahel village, west of the city.

In Nablus, the Nazi occupation forces arrested a student at the Faculty of Engineering at An-Najah National University, Malek Shtayyeh, from Tal village, during a raid on his house, hours after he was discharged from hospital following a heart attack.# Occupation

Posted in Palestine Affairs, ZIO-NAZI, Gaza, West BankComments Off on Nazi occupation arrested 15 Palestinians, including school children

Palestine: Clashes near the “Bethel” and marches in several cities in anger to the martyrdom Sayeh

3383d912918f83fa2cf955f389c138d9

By: Sammi Ibrahem,Sr

Violent clashes erupted between dozens of Palestinian youths and Nazi soldiers at the northern entrance to Al-Bireh near the Beit El checkpoint.

Students angry at the martyrdom of Bassam al-Sayeh ignited rubber tires and threw stones at Nazi soldiers as they arrived at the checkpoint.

In the context, the Palestinian security services prevented dozens from going to the northern entrance of the beer by setting up a human barrier from the security services.

In Nablus, dozens of people took part in a rage and condemnation of the killing of Bassam al-Sayeh through Nazi medical negligence, and the solidarity of sick prisoners in the Israeli jails  .

The prisoner Bassam Sayeh was martyred on Sunday, inside the hospital, “Assaf Harovi” martyr Sayeh was suffering from diseases of bone cancer, cancer of acute blood marrow, heart failure up to 80%, acute and chronic lung inflammation, and other health problems.

It is noteworthy that some (700) prisoners in Nazi camp are suffering from difficult health conditions, of which approximately (160) prisoners are in need of intensive medical follow-up.

Posted in Palestine Affairs, ZIO-NAZI, Gaza, West BankComments Off on Palestine: Clashes near the “Bethel” and marches in several cities in anger to the martyrdom Sayeh

The prisoner Hassan Salameh laments the martyr Sayeh with an influential message

l4z6l

By: Sammi Ibrahem,Sr

The prisoner in the Nazi camp Hassan Salameh mentioned the death of his companion in the families of the martyr Bassam al-Sayeh, with an impressive message from his Nazi camp after the death of his companion in light of the neglect of the prisoners.

Salameh talked about the condition of the martyrs of the captive movement who leave without any movement from one of the prisoners “Bassam moved to his mercy and became the martyr No. 221; It was a number and died a number, will the world rise and sit and boil the earth and froth and lightning the sky and thunder !!

The prisoner Hassan Salameh did not hide his resentment and sadness about the situation in which the prisoners and those who leave them are treated. In your prison we do not hear or see We have only a statement of condolence, which is written in many copies and read according to what suits us papers fly and sayings arise.

Salameh talked about Sayeh and his smile and fun despite the weakness of his body, which was exhausted by the disease, “Oh, Bassam, how wonderful you are, and despite your illness and pain, you didn’t leave you with a smile.” You talked to me about your dreams of going out and sure about that and your eagerness to participate in the resistance, I told you then: What a laugh; I said: Check the rocket handles until I press the launch button by mistake. “.

Salameh said that Bassam wished the martyrdom and sincerity of God when he asked for it, and he had what he wished. Salameh said that he wished Bassam to come out and get rid of the restriction. Our consolation is that you are now free and your soul is now in the veins of birds Khadr fly in Jinan Rahman. “

Hassan Salameh concludes his message to Bassam by saying: “Congratulations unharmed, congratulate you freedom, you have deservedly deserved it and death has earned the honor of liberating you. May God have mercy on you. I wish you witness and I was sincere.# Bassam Sayeh

Posted in Palestine Affairs, Middle East, ZIO-NAZI, Gaza, Human Rights, West BankComments Off on The prisoner Hassan Salameh laments the martyr Sayeh with an influential message


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