Archive | June 15th, 2020

“When They Say We Don’t Have the Right to Protest,” Says Naomi Klein, “That’s the Moment to Flood the Streets”

As Trump declares “law and order” clampdown against peaceful demonstrations, author and activist reminds people of most important lesson she’s learned studying history of shock doctrine tactics

.by: Jon Queally,

Demonstrators continue to protest the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis Police officer on June 03, 2020 in New York City. The white police officer, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with second-degree murder and further charges are pending for the three other officers who participated in the arrest. Floyd’s death, the most recent in a series of deaths of black Americans at the hands of the police, has set off days and nights of protests across the country. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Amid a wave of sustained protest in cities across the U.S. and the globe against police brutality and racial injustice, author and activist Naomi Klein on Thursday reminded those experiencing President Donald Trump’s America that it is precisely during times when the government is pushing hardest to discourage dissent that massive displays of public opposition are needed most.

While Trump this week has dispatched with calls for calm and unity in favor of “law and order” machismo and threats of deploying U.S. soldiers, more police, and federal agents to put down demonstrations spurred by last week’s killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis, Klein in a Twitter post reprised a warning she first issued at the outset of the president’s term: “When they say we don’t have the right to protest, that is the moment to flood the streets.”

Naomi Klein@NaomiAKlein

After 2 decades of studying the Shock Doctrine, the most important lesson I have learned is this: when they declare a state of emergency, when they say we don’t have the right to protest, that is the moment to flood the streets. It’s the only thing that has ever worked. https://twitter.com/haymarketbooks/status/1268563341489901575 …


Haymarket Books@haymarketbooks
·Jun 4Three years ago, we hosted a conversation with Michelle Alexander, Naomi Klein, and @KeeangaYamahtta in Chicago. Here’s @NaomiAKlein’s concluding remark on what we should expect from a Trump Administration during a moment of deep crisis, and how we should respond.

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“One moment when it is incredibly important to resist, is in that moment when they are trying to scare you,” Klein said during the 2017 event in Chicago. “In that moment, when they are telling you to stay home, that is when you go out. When they are saying stay home—go out.”

Individuals and communities nationwide have demonstrated their inherent understanding of Klein’s guidance. Even after Trump had Lafayette Square outside the White House violently cleared of nonviolent protesters on Monday and threatened to send U.S. soldiers to patrol other U.S. city streets this week, the daily and nightly demonstrations, as Common Dreams previously reported, have only grown in strength and size as the week progressed.

Klein told the audience in 2017 that “we won’t know when it will happen,” but that when it does people should “flood the streets” en masse. “That matters more than anything,” she said to applause. “When they try to take away the right to protest, flood the streets, ok? Get ready.”

The event was related to Klein’s new book that year, titled “No Is Not Enough,” which offered an initial framework for understanding Trump’s rise to power as well as a blueprint for how best to resist his obvious racist and fascist tendencies.

Watch the full 2017 event, sponsored by Haymarket Books and featuring prominent scholars Michelle Alexander and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, below:

blob:https://www.facebook.com/61e1c9e3-108c-48eb-bf54-654368b812d2

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The US Is Facing a Full-Scale Assault on the Press

As police continue to attack reporters covering protests nationwide, this is why the ACLU is filing this class-action lawsuit today.

by: Brian Hauss

This lawsuit will be the first of several we intend to file in states across the country. (Photo by Alejandra Villa Loarca/Newsday RM via Getty Images)

This lawsuit will be the first of several we intend to file in states across the country. (Photo by Alejandra Villa Loarca/Newsday RM via Getty Images)

As people take to the streets to demand justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tony McDade, and too many other Black people who have been killed by police in recent years, journalists have joined them to bear witness. While covering these protests in cities throughout the country, journalists have become conspicuous targets for arrest, intimidation, and assault by police officers, even though (or perhaps because) they are clearly identifiable as members of the press.

These apparently deliberate attacks on journalists violate the First Amendment freedom of the press, and they will not go unanswered.These apparently deliberate attacks on journalists violate the First Amendment freedom of the press, and they will not go unanswered. The ACLU of Minnesota is filing a class-action lawsuit against Minnesota’s state and local law enforcement officials to ensure that police officers who target journalists are held fully accountable for their unlawful actions.

We also plan to protect another of our essential First Amendment rights: the right to protest. We’re pursuing legal actions to stop police brutality against protesters and organizers.

Throughout the George Floyd protests, there have been numerous, well-documented instances of deliberate abuse against journalists by law enforcement officers. A Minnesota State Patrol officer arrested CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez and his crew during a live broadcast, despite the journalists repeatedly having offered to comply with police and asking where they could move. Los Angeles Times reporter Molly Hennessy-Fiske and photographer Carolyn Cole were chased by Minnesota State Patrol officers, tear-gassed, and shot at with rubber bullets, even though both were wearing their press credentials and they identified themselves as journalists. And police officers pepper-sprayed a group of visibly credentialed journalists, including KTSP reporter Ryan Raiche and his producer, as they were pinned against a wall.

And these are examples from Minnesota alone. The Reporters Committee for the Freedom the Press and the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker have identified numerous other instances of official abuse against journalists in cities across the country.

These attacks violate the press’s clearly established First Amendment right to report on public protests and police activities. An open society depends on a free press to keep the public informed and to bear witness to government actions. When law enforcement officers target members of the press with impunity, they strike at the root of our democracy. Law enforcement officers who perpetrate these abuses must be held accountable for their actions to the fullest extent of the law.

Unfortunately, as in so many other cases, senior law enforcement officials have refused to take action in response to flagrant abuse. They have failed to establish necessary guidelines, trainings, and disciplinary protocols to ensure that attacks on journalists are treated with zero tolerance. Instead, they have made excuses and ducked responsibility, such as when the Minnesota State Patrol claimed that they released Mr. Jimenez and his crew “once they were confirmed to be members of the media” – even though that fact was obvious before the arrests took place.

If the government refuses to hold its officers accountable for their unlawful actions, we will. This lawsuit will be the first of several we intend to file in states across the country. We will not rest until the press is once again free to report the news without fear or favor.

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We Interrupt This Pandemic… With Demands for Justice and Healing

The call to “reopen” society isn’t just about stores and bars; it’s about reopening ourselves to the reality of a system that is built on racism, violence, and injustice.

by: Randall Amster

A protester wears a face mask displaying the words "I can't breathe" during a Black Lives Matter protest in Hyde Park on June 3, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. The death of an African-American man, George Floyd, while in the custody of Minneapolis police has sparked protests across the United States, as well as demonstrations of solidarity in many countries around the world. (Photo: Justin Setterfield/Getty Images)

A protester wears a face mask displaying the words “I can’t breathe” during a Black Lives Matter protest in Hyde Park on June 3, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. The death of an African-American man, George Floyd, while in the custody of Minneapolis police has sparked protests across the United States, as well as demonstrations of solidarity in many countries around the world. (Photo: Justin Setterfield/Getty Images)

Remember the coronavirus? It dominated the news for three months, redefined every aspect of our daily lives, and killed over a hundred thousand in the US alone. It also further exposed the venality and the insanity of our current Administration, making this reality-show presidency seem even more surreal than it already had been. Long after immunities and vaccines have quelled the acute surge, people will still tell stories about the quarantine period(s), marking it as a generationally significant societal event.

But it turns out there are more pressing issues that have defined our politics and societies for centuries. Like a pandemic, these issues are punctuated by acute moments and spikes of fear; unlike a pandemic, they aren’t triggered by external conditions and microscopic occurrences. Rather, these are the things we do to ourselves, initiated and instantiated by human cultures, infusing our systems of governance and structures of power at the macroscopic scale. These core issues aren’t pandemic—they’re endemic.

“Maybe in some manner beyond mere quantification, the virus has further illuminated the ways in which we’re all at risk but how those risks are starkly distributed across society.”

We’ve tried to fashion names for these things: structural racism, police violence, economic inequality. Yet because they are endemic, naming them as such can make these issues appear compartmentalized, leading to calls for reforming particular sectors or remediating specific acts of abhorrent behavior. What feels different right now—prompted by the confluence of a pandemic, economic downturn, and yet another wave of horrific racial homicides—is an intensifying sense that the entire system itself is sick.

The uprisings and unrest in the wake of George Floyd’s murder have centered race issues in the discourse while tapping into an array of related crises. It seems as if there is an implicit recognition of the ways in which we are interconnected—again, perhaps spurred by months of pandemic lockdown—and how famous aphorisms like King’s “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” accurately describe our world. On some level we are all George Floyd, we all can’t breathe, and we all want justice.

Still, the deeper reality is that some of us are more like George Floyd and more impacted by the forces that killed him. Even in a pandemic that seems indiscriminate in terms of the lack of a viral intention, the negative impacts skew strongly toward individuals and communities that are already marginalized in our system. Preexisting factors of poor health, substandard housing, lower wages, environmental toxins, limited services, and policies of social and spatial containment have shaped rates of infection and death.

Maybe in some manner beyond mere quantification, the virus has further illuminated the ways in which we’re all at risk but how those risks are starkly distributed across society. Perhaps a few months of joint vulnerability and the realization of how precariously intertwined our lives are did something to change the equation in people’s minds. It could be that widespread economic effects have sparked renewed insight about how many of us are one crisis away from being on the wrong end of the meritocratic myth.

Or maybe it’s even simpler: months of social distance have made people long for getting back to their lives, only to be immediately confronted with an unvarnished reminder that “business as usual” includes racism, violence, and structural injustice. The call to “reopen” society isn’t just about stores and bars; it’s about reopening ourselves to the reality of a system that is built on racism, violence, and injustice. One can be victimized by this, or perpetuate it, or be complacent about it—or a combination of all the above.

Either way, this is the system that sustains us, and we’re all part of it. Life is filled with moments for choosing when to accommodate and when to resist, when to “go along to get along” and when to refuse to do so. It’s not an exact science or a totalizing litmus test, and the different ways people are situated influence how we meet such moments. In the larger scheme, though, looms the recognition of common purpose and social solidarity. And that may well be the most newsworthy and impactful revelation of all.

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I’m Outraged By Trump’s Church Photo-Op

As a Catholic sister, I think Trump should read his Bible, not pose with it.

by: Sister Karen M. Donahue

He’s beaten and tear gassed people peacefully protesting for justice for their neighbors.(Photo: Shutterstock)

He’s beaten and tear gassed people peacefully protesting for justice for their neighbors.(Photo: Shutterstock)

In the book of Jeremiah, the Hebrew prophet shares instructions from God about entering a place of worship.

“Stand at the gate of the house of the Lord and proclaim this message there,” God tells the prophet. “Reform your ways and your deeds so that I may dwell with you in this place.” You can enter, the prophet relays, only “if each of you deals justly with your neighbor; if you no longer oppress the alien, the orphan, and the widow; if you no longer shed innocent blood in this place” (Jeremiah 7: 1-10).

These words came to mind as the shocking photos of Donald Trump standing in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, Bible in hand, flashed across TVs, computers, and phones.

What was the president trying to convey? It certainly was not a call to reform our ways, to deal justly with our neighbor, or welcome the alien, the widow, and the orphan.

Only a short time before the president’s appearance, the full coercive power of the state was unleashed on people peacefully protesting brutal violence against black Americans. They were chased from Lafayette Square in a barrage of teargas and rubber bullets.

Many white Americans were shocked by the brutal murder of George Floyd at the hands of a white Minneapolis police officer. But for black Americans, this was only the most recent incident in a 400-year history of racism. The rallies and marches taking place across the country demonstrate how this deep wound continues to fester.

The president’s response should elicit nothing short of condemnation from followers of Jesus.

In a conference call with governors, the president urged them to “dominate,” arrest, and imprison demonstrators for “ten years.” He chided the governors for not acting with greater force, labeling them “jerks” for not doing so. There was not one word from the president about racism or its long legacy of oppression and exclusion.

There were other reasons Trump’s church photo-op was shameful as well. For one thing, the president stood in front of a church sign that said “All Are Welcome.” The hypocrisy is almost too much to bear.

The Trump administration has effectively closed our borders, consigning many asylum seekers to remain in dangerous Mexican border towns while they wait for their asylum hearings.

Persons from certain countries, which the president has described in vulgar and derogatory terms, are banned from the U.S., and tens of thousands of migrants languish in jails and for-profit detention centers where they face a heightened risk of exposure to the coronavirus.

Meanwhile, the coronavirus pandemic and recession have fallen heaviest on communities of color. These are situations that should remind us that we are one people, that our health is intimately related to the health of everyone else.

I am a Catholic sister. Our deepest belief as Christians—whether Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox, or Evangelical—holds that we are all children of the same loving God and are responsible for one another.

Unfortunately, our president, even though he chose to stand in front of a Christian church with the Scriptures in his hands, does not seem to understand this most basic tenet of our faith.

He ignored the pandemic for weeks, forced the states into destructive bidding wars for supplies, ignored the counsel of public health professionals, and belittled mitigation measures by refusing to wear a mask or practice social distancing.

And now, he’s beaten and tear gassed people peacefully protesting for justice for their neighbors.

The president is using churches and the faith community as a backdrop for his reelection campaign—and nothing more. Rather than posing in front of a church, Trump would be wise to go inside and spend some time reflecting on the message of Jesus.

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In Trump’s America, Gun-Toting Anti-Quarantine Activists Called “Very Good People,” But Unarmed Protesters Denouncing Police Brutality Are “Thugs”

What the president and others don’t realize is that we’re not just protesting the death of George Floyd (or Breonna Taylor, or Ahmaud Arbery, or Eric Garner, or Alton Sterling, or Philando Castile). We are also protesting the racist culture embedded in police precincts throughout the nation—and the brutality that comes with it.

by: Tracey L. Rogers

A protester faces off with Minnesota State Police officers on May 29, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. – Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was seen in an explosive video pressing his knee to the neck of handcuffed George Floyd for at least five minutes on May 25, was arrested earlier on May 29, said John Harrington, Commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. (Photo: Kerem Yucel / AFP via Getty Images)

As protests and riots spread like wildfire across the nation in response to the death of George Floyd and other black people at the hands of white police officers, I cannot help but recall an old African Proverb:

“The child who is not embraced by the village will burn it down to feel its warmth.”

Protests and riots are a part of this country’s history, from the Holy Week Uprisings that occurred after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to the Los Angeles riots that took place after police were acquitted of severely beating Rodney King in 1992.

Of course, I do not condone the looting and violence that often follow public gatherings of unrest. But as a black woman living in a racist society, I know the pain and frustrations of those who are sick and tired of being sick and tired.

Dr. King once said in a speech that, “A riot is the language of the unheard.” For far too long, Black Americans have gone unheard.

The injustices that plague us become especially unbearable when you compare the mostly peaceful organizing by black activists seeking justice for George Floyd to the white protestors who entered the state capitol building in Michigan last month, armed with rifles, confederate flags, and other symbols of the slave-owning south, to reject—of all things—COVID-19 stay-at-home orders.

President Trump tweeted his support for those protestors. “These are very good people,” he said, “but they are angry. They want their lives back again, safely!”

But when unarmed black people took to the streets for Mr. Floyd, Trump tweeted, “These THUGS are dishonoring his memory, and I won’t let that happen.”

What the president and others don’t realize is that we’re not just protesting the death of George Floyd (or Breonna Taylor, or Ahmaud Arbery, or Eric Garner, or Alton Sterling, or Philando Castile). We are also protesting the racist culture embedded in police precincts throughout the nation—and the brutality that comes with it.

When Sacramento police shot and killed Stephon Clark in 2017, 84 people were arrested in a subsequent peaceful march against police violence. Just last month in New York, Shakheim Brunson was beaten and pinned to the ground by police after being asked to disperse in compliance with social distance orders.

And of course, peaceful, unarmed protesters are being violently attacked by police across the country today — most recently so Trump could enjoy a photo-op outside a Washington, D.C. church.

This is the infamous tale of two Americas.

Black protestors get pegged as “Black Identity Extremists” by the FBI and can be prosecuted as domestic terrorists.

If you’re a real-life white identity extremist, on the other hand, you can actually join the ranks of the law enforcement. “There is a long history of the military, police, and other authorities supporting, protecting, or even being members of white supremacy groups,” wrote Rashad Robinson in The Guardian last year.

All this comes around the 99th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre that took place in 1921, when white mobs rampaged against black people and black-owned businesses. Private planes from a nearby airfield even dropped firebombs on black neighborhoods, wiping out a district then known as “Black Wall Street.”

Who were the “thugs” in this incident?

And, as Dr. King asked in his speech on riots, “What is it that America has failed to hear?”

This injustice is precisely why we march. This is why we protest. This is why we chant, “no justice, no peace.”

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Global Meat Giants Fuel Major Future Risk of Creating Next Pandemic, Investor Group Warns

“Factory farming is both vulnerable to pandemics and guilty of creating them.”

by: Andrea Germanos,

A piglet looks out from its enclosure

A piglet looks out from its enclosure. (PhotoKevin/flickr/cc)

Global investor network Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return said Wednesday that the novel coronavirus stands to be the “straw that breaks the meat industry’s back” as the group released a new report warning that industrial meat production is fueling the risk of future zoonotic pandemics.

“Factory farming is both vulnerable to pandemics and guilty of creating them. It’s a self-sabotaging cycle that destroys value and risks lives,” Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return (FAIRR) founder Jeremy Coller said in a statement launching the new report, Infected Industry.

Using criteria including worker safety, deforestation, animal welfare, and antibiotic stewardship, researchers analyzed the biggest 60 global meat, fish, and dairy companies and found that 44 of them—73%—rated as “high-risk” in FAIRR’s new Pandemic Ranking tool.

FAIRR also highlighted how the conditions animals face in industrial operations, like densely packed, poorly ventilated quarters, “create the perfect environment for deadly diseases to mutate and spread rapidly.” Other factors contributing to industrial meat production’s role in fostering possible future pandemics include humans destroying natural animal habitats to make way for more farms and the industry’s heavy reliance upon treating animals with antibiotics—thus giving rise to antimicrobial resistance.

Maria Lettini, executive director of FAIRR, spoke about those conditions, explaing how factory farms are “incubators and reservoirs” of zoonotic diseases in a Wednesday interview with Euronews:

FAIRR Initiative@FAIRRInitiative

Our Executive Director @MariaLettini on @euronews live this morning, talking about @FAIRRinitiative‘s new landmark report ‘An Industry Infected’:

Embedded video

Casualties of the corporate profit-focused approach to animal agriculture in the midst of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic have already been revealed.

With coronavirus outbreaks shutting down meat processing plants, millions of animals are being culled, often with cruel methods. And, as Animal Welfare Institute’s farm animal program director Dena Jones recently noted, “plants that don’t treat animals well often don’t treat workers well.”

Many already exploited meat plant workers are being forced to go to work despite the facilities becoming veritable Covid-19 hotspots. The Food & Environment Reporting Network also reported last week:

Ten of the 14 rural counties with the highest infection rates contain meatpacking plants with outbreaks. Of those 10, four of the outbreaks are located at Tyson Foods plants, two at National Beef plants, and one each at a Smithfield, Cargill, Seaboard Foods, and JBS plant. These companies are some of the biggest meat producers in the county. According to an analysis by FERN, Tyson Foods alone accounts for a third of all Covid-19 cases among meatpacking workers nationally.

“Meat processing finds itself at the centre of the pandemic with over 20,000 workers in the U.S. alone having already contracted Covid-19,” said Peter van der Werf, senior engagement specialist, at asset manager Robeco.

The bottom line for meat giants is taking a hit too. Jeff Currie, head of commodities research at Goldman Sachs, said last month that the only other commodity market “looking as precarious as oil” was livestock—a datapoint contributing to some food system analysts’ suggestion that the coronavirus appears to be helping sound the death knell for factory farming. 

As FAIRR’s Coller explained, the changes that should be put in place by the industry to avoid future disease outbreaks—like better approaches to animal health—just don’t line up with its modus operandi.

“To avoid causing the next pandemic, the meat industry must tackle lax safety standards for food and workers alike, closely confined animals and overused antibiotics,” said Coller. “This will disrupt a supply chain already cracking from fundamental land, water, and emissions constraints.”

To achieve better resilience in the face external shocks, the new research suggests investing in plant-based proteins—and the market shows a rowing appetite for such products.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J), who introduced in December a new agricultural reform bill that includes a proposed national moratorium on factory farms, said last month that it’s time for agribusiness behemoths’ control over the food system to end. 

“Our food system was not broken by the pandemic and it was not broken by independent family farmers,” said Booker. “It was broken by large, multinational corporations like Tyson, Smithfield, and JBS that, because of their buying power and size, have undue influence over the marketplace and over public policy. That undue influence was on full display with President Trump’s recent executive order prioritizing meatpacker profits over the health and safety of workers.”

“We need to fix this broken system,” Booker continued. “That means protecting family farmers and food system workers and holding corporate integrators responsible for the harm they are causing. Large factory farms are harmful to rural communities, public health, and the environment and we must immediately begin to transition to a more sustainable and humane system.”

FAIRR’s new report also comes a day after renowned primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall continued her calls for food systems to move away from factory farming.

“Our disrespect for wild animals and our disrespect for farmed animals has created this situation where disease can spill over to infect human beings,” she said. 

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‘Yes, I Will Name Names’: AOC Leads Charge Against Empty Corporate Claims of #BlackLivesMatter

“This moment calls for transformation,” Ocasio-Cortezsaid. “Give people change.”

by: Julia Conley,

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) called out a number of corporations and sports teams this week for claiming solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the racial justice protests taking place across the U.S., pointing out that they’ve done little to support people of color. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez set the record straight for wealthy corporations on Wednesday, rejecting what she called “bland statements” of support for the Black Lives Matter movement and calling on the companies to take concrete action to further racial justice.

The New York Democrat’s first target was the Washington Redskins, which posted a black square in support of #BlackOutTuesday. The social media campaign was meant to urge corporations and non-black users to pause their posting of self-promotional, marketing, or personal content and amplify black voices and racial justice efforts instead. 

Ocasio-Cortez promptly told the team that to support the movement, the first step it should take is to listen to Indigenous people’s decades-long demand to change its name.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez@AOC

Want to really stand for racial justice? Change your name. https://twitter.com/Redskins/status/1267918269798850563 …

“This moment calls for transformation,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted Wednesday. “Your statement should include your organization’s INTERNAL commitments to change, particularly if you’ve been called on it before… Give people change.”

The NFL also faced harsh criticism for its statement claiming the nationwide protests in response to the police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, and countless other examples of injustice “reflect the pain, anger, and frustration that so many of us feel.”

“Save the bullshit,” tweeted Houston Texans player Kenny Stills in response. 

The NFL and its owners were accused of blacklisting former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick after he knelt during the national anthem at his football games to peacefully protest police brutality and racial injustice.

Jimmy Traina@JimmyTraina

Roger Goodell implemented a rule that says players can’t peacefully protest during the anthem on the field because he was completely & utterly terrified of fox news & maga costing him a few dollars even though the NFL makes billions. I don’t think this is the fight for him. https://twitter.com/NFL/status/1266852547890839552 …

On Twitter, Ocasio-Cortez called out a number of companies which publicly expressed support for the protests in the past week but sell products that aid racial discrimination, tolerate racism on their platforms, and fail to support black families and businesses.

Brian Klaas@brianklaas

The brazenness of this is unbelievable. The NFL owners blacklisted Colin Kaepernick and punished players who kneeled to protest police brutality. So the NFL is not exactly credible when they make a statement like this after a cop kneeled on a black man’s neck to murder him. https://twitter.com/NFL/status/1266852547890839552 …

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez@AOCReplying to @AOC

Yes, I will name names.@amazon needs to stop integrating Ring cameras w/ police depts & selling facial recognition tech to ICE.@Nextdoor needs to publicly deal w/ their Karen problem

Commercial banks need to stop lobbying against the Community Reinvestment Act

Name yours 43.9K4:51 PM – Jun 3, 2020

Other advocates joined the congresswoman in pointing out the hypocrisy of corporations which have been complicit in mass incarceration, wealth inequality, and other injustices.

RAICES@RAICESTEXASReplying to @AOC and 2 others

@Microsoft is another who claims to stand in solidarity with but also needs to end its contract with ICE.

These companies are profiting off the imprisonment of black & brown folks.1,4425:07 PM – Jun 3, 2020

Fight For 15@fightfor15

.@McDonalds you are not “one of us.” #BlackLivesMatter #FightFor15 https://twitter.com/McDonalds/status/1268165315415900160?s=20 … pic.twitter.com/T0rgznFYyf

McDonald’s@McDonaldsThey were one of us:

Trayvon Martin. Michael Brown. Alton Sterling. Botham Jean. Atatiana Jefferson. Ahmaud Arbery. George Floyd. pic.twitter.com/s1UhP5vncv
2,7457:21 PM – Jun 3, 2020

Staying in the Game@AdrienneLawReplying to @fightfor15 and 7 others

McDonalds has capitalized on the Black community for too long. You have more franchises in predominantly Black neighborhoods than we have full-service grocery stores, pumping us full of toxins that contribute to the underlying issues you use as an excuse when we’re murdered.

NO.487:39 PM – Jun 3, 2020

Mijente @ConMijenteReplying to @AOC and 2 others

@PalantirTech sells tools to police & ICE—analytics tools that help them get data on folks & things like predictive policing@ThomsonReuters is a data broker for cops & ICE that amasses HUGE amounts of data (they were used in Minnesota)

Both gotta stophttp://notechforice.com/ 565:36 PM – Jun 3, 2020

In his newsletter, Popular Information, journalist Judd Legum wrote that many of the corporations that have expressed solidarity in recent days have also donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to lawmakers with “F” ratings from the NAACP.

“In this election cycle, Citigroup has donated to 74 members of Congress that were rated “F” by the NAACP,” wrote Legum. “That means they voted with the NAACP 59% of the time or less. Most of the members who received Citigroup cash scored far lower, and many were in the single digits.”

“Citigroup appears to believe that aligning itself with the Black Lives Matter movement and the ongoing fight for civil rights is good for its brand,” he added. “But its political spending shows that it quietly bankrolls politicians who consistently vote to undermine, not protect, civil rights.”

Legum found similar trends in the political spending of Google and Amazon.

“If you want to understand a corporation’s values, ignore its tweets, and pay attention to its FEC filings,” Legum wrote.

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Jane Goodall Warns Humanity Will Be ‘Finished’ After Covid-19 Without Ending ‘Absolute Disrespect for Animals and the Environment’

“Our disrespect for wild animals and our disrespect for farmed animals has created this situation where disease can spill over to infect human beings.”

byJessica Corbett,

<p>Primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall particpated in a Tuesday webinar about pandemics, wildlife, and intensive animal farming.

Primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall particpated in a Tuesday webinar about pandemics, wildlife, and intensive animal farming. (Photo: Compassion in World Farming)

In a webinar Tuesday about pandemics, wildlife, and intensive animal farming, world renowned primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall warned of dire consequences if humanity fails to rapidly reform the global food system and stop destroying natural habitats.

“One of the lessons learnt from this crisis is that we must change our ways.”
—Jane Goodall, primatologist

“If we do not do things differently, we are finished,” said Goodall, a United Nations messenger of peace, during the Compassion in World Farming event. “We can’t go on very much longer like this.”

The 86-year-old founder of the Jane Goodall Institute, famous for her research on wild chimpanzees at Gombe National Park in Tanzania, delivered the online speech as the international community continued to battle the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed over 382,000 and infected more than 6.4 million people worldwide.

As the Guardian reported: “She blamed the emergence of Covid-19 on the over-exploitation of the natural world, which has seen forests cut down, species made extinct, and natural habitats destroyed… Intensive farming was also creating a reservoir of animal diseases that would spill over and hurt human society, said Goodall.”

Compassion in World Farming EU@CIWF_EUReplying to @CIWF_EU

The Guardian has just published a BRILLIANT overview of Dr. #JaneGoodall‘s talk, thanks to the magical pen of @fionaharvey!

Well done to all speakers! #JGoodallOnPandemics @JGIBelgium @SKyriakidesEU @jwojchttps://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/jun/03/jane-goodall-humanity-is-finished-if-it-fails-to-adapt-after-covid-19 …

“We have brought this on ourselves because of our absolute disrespect for animals and the environment,” Goodall said of the ongoing pandemic. “Our disrespect for wild animals and our disrespect for farmed animals has created this situation where disease can spill over to infect human beings.”

“We have come to a turning point in our relationship with the natural world,” she added. “One of the lessons learnt from this crisis is that we must change our ways. Scientists warn that to avoid future crises, we must drastically change our diets and move to plant-rich foods—for the sake of the animals, planet, and the health of our children.”

In addition to urging the world to urgently shift away from factory farming and the destruction of wildlife, Goodall acknowledged the need to end poverty, war, and violence worldwide to protect nature. Her speech was celebrated by animal rights and climate campaigners who tweeted the Guardian‘s reporting about the webinar:

Animal Aid@AnimalAid

https://bit.ly/3covTLW  “Our disrespect for wild animals & our disrespect for farmed animals has created this situation where disease can spill over to infect human beings.” #JaneGoodall We must transition to PB agriculture http://animalaid.org.uk/transition 546:21 PM – Jun 3, 2020

Extinction Rebellion UK @XRebellionUK

“We have brought this on ourselves because of our absolute disrespect for animals & the environment…”

Humanity will be “finished” if we fail to drastically change our food systems in response to #coronavirus & #ClimateCrisis” says @JaneGoodallInst https://tinyurl.com/ybhzx22e 1367:52 AM – Jun 3, 2020

The event also featured remarks from Compassion in World Farming Global CEO Philip Lymbery, who introduced Goodall, and seven Members of the European Parliament (MEPs). It came as governments and international bodies are faced with mounting calls from activists, healthcare providers, progressive policymakers, and other experts to pursue a #PeoplesBailoutJust RecoveryHealthy RecoveryGreen RecoveryGreen Stimulus, and Global Green New Deal.

The webinar also came amid the emergence of new research bolstering Goodall’s warnings about the impacts of intensive animal agriculture and humanity’s destruction of nature.

As Common Dreams reported, a study published Monday concluded that the current mass extinction crisis is “human caused and accelerating,” and “may be the most serious environmental threat to the persistence of civilization, because it is irreversible.”

The study’s authors warned that continued environmental destruction could result in more threats to human health. “The vaccine for Covid-19 was natural habitat,” lead author Gerardo Ceballos González told the New York Times. “The pandemic is a great example of how badly we’ve treated nature.”

Research published Wednesday by the London-based investor initiative Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return (FAIRR) found that 73% of world’s 60 largest meat, fish, and dairy companies are at “high risk” for fostering future zoonotic pandemics.

bruunlasse@bruunlasse

Let us use this real-time case study wisely. | Just released @FAIRRInitiative report: “As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds globally, we are presented with a real-time case study into the vulnerability of animal agriculture systems to external shocks.” https://www.fairr.org/article/industry-infected/ …

The group’s new report features a “Pandemic Ranking” that combines six risks from the 2019 Coller FAIRR Protein Producer Index: deforestation and biodiversity loss, antibiotics, waste and pollution, working conditions, food safety, and animal welfare.

“Factory farming is both vulnerable to pandemics, and guilty of creating them,” Jeremy Coller, founder of FAIRR and CIO of Coller Capital, said in a statement announcing the report. “It’s a self-sabotaging cycle that destroys value and risks lives.”

“To avoid causing the next pandemic, the meat industry must tackle lax safety standards for food and workers alike, closely confined animals, and overused antibiotics,” he said. “This will disrupt a supply chain already cracking from fundamental land, water, and emissions constraints.”

Posted in Environment, HealthComments Off on Jane Goodall Warns Humanity Will Be ‘Finished’ After Covid-19 Without Ending ‘Absolute Disrespect for Animals and the Environment’

NYT Rebuked for Tom Cotton Op-Ed Calling for US Military to Use ‘Overwhelming Show of Force’ Against Protests

“This is the most openly authoritarian piece of writing I’ve read from an American politician who has been in power during my lifetime.”

by: Andrea Germanos,

Senator Tom Cotton

Senator Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) enters a Senators Only elevator before attending the Weekly Senate Policy Luncheon on June 25, 2019 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images)

The New York Times drew sharp criticism on Wednesday for publishing an op-ed by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton calling for the military to be deployed to the nation’s streets to respond to the protests over the police killing of George Floyd.

The op-ed was titled “Send in the Troops.”

Seriously NYT?!? https://t.co/2IBtrLU7RG https://t.co/g7r5ANrFgk

— Fulya Apaydin (@Fulya_Apaydin) June 3, 2020

In the op-ed, Cotton (R-Ark.) claimed that “[o]utnumbered police officers, encumbered by feckless politicians, bore the brunt of the violence” from the unrest. He added that certain “elites have excused this orgy of violence in the spirit of radical chic, calling it an understandable response to the wrongful death of George Floyd.”

He also suggested that suggested the protesters are “nihilist criminals… simply out for loot and the thrill of destruction, with cadres of left-wing radicals like antifa infiltrating protest marches to exploit Floyd’s death for their own anarchic purposes.”

To respond to the social justice uprising, Cotton called for “an overwhelming show of force to disperse, detain, and ultimately deter lawbreakers,” and reiterated his call for President Donald Trump to invoke the Insurrection Act to deploy military to streets, dismissing opponents of using that 1807 law as “excitable critics, ignorant of both the law and our history.”

“Some governors have mobilized the National Guard, yet others refuse, and in some cases the rioters still outnumber the police and Guard combined. In these circumstances, the Insurrection Act authorizes the president to employ the military ‘or any other means’ in ‘cases of insurrection, or obstruction to the laws,'” claimed Cotton.

“Why, New York Times, why?” tweeted Jason Lyall, a political scientist at Dartmouth.

Ida Bae Wells@nhannahjones

I’ll probably get in trouble for this, but to not say something would be immoral. As a black woman, as a journalist, as an American, I am deeply ashamed that we ran this. https://nyti.ms/3dyvJ5Z 118K1:11 AM – Jun 4, 2020

“Trump is not the only problem of this country,” tweeted writer and historian Massimo Faggioli. “I am not referring to Sen. Cotton, but also to the NYT choosing to publish this.” 

Tayari Jones@tayari

Wow. Is this where we are, @nyt???

Send In the Troops https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/03/opinion/tom-cotton-protests-military.html?smid=tw-share …179:48 PM – Jun 3, 2020

Others responding to the new op-ed focused on Cotton’s language and claims.

“This is the most openly authoritarian piece of writing I’ve read from an American politician who has been in power during my lifetime,” tweeted author and HuffPost reporter Zach Carter.

“Tom Cotton is a fascist,” tweeted journalist Walker Bragman. “Hate oozes from every word of this dehumanizing screed.”

Cotton had already urged Trump to invoke the Insurrection Act in recent days, saying in a Monday interview on Fox News, “If local law enforcement is overwhelmed, if local politicians will not do their most basic job to protect our citizens, let’s see how these anarchists respond when the 101st Airborne is on the other side of the street.”

The Times has previously pubished op-eds by Cotton, including one from last year in which he argues the U.S. should buy Greenland, a purchase Trump also floated

Posted in USAComments Off on NYT Rebuked for Tom Cotton Op-Ed Calling for US Military to Use ‘Overwhelming Show of Force’ Against Protests

Three Other Police Officers Finally Charged Over Murder of George Floyd

After Nearly 10,000 Arrested During Week of Protest, Three Other Police Officers Finally Charged Over Murder of George Floyd

“All you had to do was arrest three more.”

by: Eoin Higgins, staff writer

Screenshot of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin and others pinning down George Floyd. (Image: Screenshot)

This is a developing story… Check back for possible updates…

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison announced Wednesday that he has formally filed charges against the three remaining officers involved in last week’s killing of George Floyd with “aiding and abetting” second-degree murder, a felony, and also filed a motion to elevate the charges against officer Derek Chauvin, already under arrest, from third-degree to second-degree murder.

“I strongly believe that these developments are in the interest of justice for Mr. Floyd, his family, our community, and our state,” Ellison said.

Ellison said that arrest warrants had been issued for the newly-charged officers—Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng—and also made it clear he would be the lead prosecutor as the cases make their way through the courts.

Ellison held a press conference just before 4:00pm local time. Watch:

“Overdue but necessary justice,” tweeted Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.)

Ilhan Omar@IlhanMN

Attorney General Ellison is charging ALL officers involved in George Floyd’s killing with aiding and abetting murder, and charging Derek Chauvin with second degree murder.

Overdue but necessary justice.139K7:29 PM – Jun 3, 2020

As NBC News reports:

Former officers Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng are facing charges of aiding and abetting murder, according to criminal complaints filed by the state of Minnesota on Wednesday. The murder charge against another former officer, Derek Chauvin, were also elevated to second-degree murder.

The Floyd family, in a statement through their attorney, Ben Crump, called the news of the charges a “bittersweet moment.”

Ben Crump Law, PLLC@BenCrumpLaw

@AttorneyCrump, the legal team, & the family of #GeorgeFloyd have released the following statement about the arrest of the other three MPD officers involved in the death of George Floyd and the addition of a felony second-degree murder charge against fired officer Derek Chauvin.

It’s unclear if the arrests will calm an angry nation. Protesters around the country turned out Tuesday evening for the eighth consecutive night of demonstrations over Floyd’s murder.

View image on Twitter

As the New York Times reported:

While demonstrators in many cities defied curfews, they did so peacefully.

They sang “We Shall Overcome” at the Barclay’s Center in Brooklyn and a large crowd tried to cross over the Manhattan bridge in defiance of a curfew. Outside Wrigley Field in Chicago, crowds chanted “Hands up” as they raised their arms to the sky. In Los Angeles, even as hundreds were arrested throughout the city, a crowd gathered outside the home of Mayor Eric Garcetti, who earlier in the day had joined the demonstrations and taken a knee as he listened to pleas. On a bridge in Portland, Ore., hundreds lay face down, hands behind their backs, for a “die in” intended to emulate the death of George Floyd.

Mr. Floyd, a 46-year-old black security guard, died after his neck was pinned under a white police officer’s knee for nearly nine minutes in Minneapolis last week. The officer has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The killing, captured on video, was the spark for the outpouring of anger and anguish expressed in demonstrations in more than 140 cities for over a week.

At least 9,300 U.S. civilians have been arrested due to their participation in an ongoing nationwide uprising against police violence and brutality sparked by Floyd’s murder.

Fred@WaywardWinifred

All you had to do was arrest 3 more. https://twitter.com/AP/status/1268077274454253575 …The Associated Press@APAn @AP tally shows at least 9,300 people have been arrested in protests since the police killing of George Floyd. http://apne.ws/IduBMBZ 1998:30 AM – Jun 3, 2020

That tally comes from the Associated Press, which has been tracking the arrests around the country.

Activist group CodePink tweeted that the struggle was ongoing. 

“This is just the beginning,” the group said. “We must continue demanding #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd! #BlackLivesMatter.”

Posted in USA, Human RightsComments Off on Three Other Police Officers Finally Charged Over Murder of George Floyd

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