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Five Major Flaws in Trump’s Afghanistan Strategy that He Does Not Want You to Know About

NOVANEWS
  

According to his Monday night speech, 45* is sending 4,000 more US troops to Afghanistan, signaling support for the longest-running war in U.S. history. But there are at least five gaping holes in his plan:

1. Trump’s Afghanistan strategy is a betrayal of his 2016 campaign

Back before he was even considering running for president, 45 tweeted on multiple occasions that the war in Afghanistan was a “waste,” “nonsense,” and “a total disaster.” In 2011, 45 tweeted his agreement with then-Congressman Ron Paul’s assessment that the U.S. was “wasting lives and money in Afghanistan.”

However, according to a New York Times article published Monday night, 45 eventually submitted to pressure from the multiple generals in his cabinet and administration, who convinced him that the only viable strategy in Afghanistan was to send in thousands more troops. This means the Afghan war is the longest-running war in American history, surpassing the Moro Rebellion (1899-1913) by four years.

Let’s get out of Afghanistan. Our troops are being killed by the Afghanis we train and we waste billions there. Nonsense! Rebuild the USA.

We should leave Afghanistan immediately. No more wasted lives. If we have to go back in, we go in hard & quick. Rebuild the US first.

We have wasted an enormous amount of blood and treasure in Afghanistan. Their government has zero appreciation. Let’s get out!

Ron Paul is right when he says we are wasting lives and money in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Afghanistan is a total disaster. We don’t know what we are doing. They are, in addition to everything else, robbing us blind.

Now Obama is keeping our soldiers in Afghanistan for at least another year. He is losing two wars simultaneously.

2.  More U.S. troops won’t “change a damn thing”

Even for those who support the war, it’s unclear that the additional 4,000 soldiers is enough to change much. Michael Adams, a former Special Operations Command Sergeant Major with years of experience in Afghanistan, told Grit Post that the troop surge won’t be enough to turn the tide in the war-torn region.

“If 4,000 is correct, even if the majority were Special Operations Forces, it isn’t going to change a damn thing on the ground in Afghanistan or Pakistan,” Adams told Grit Post in an interview. “This has all been done before and we know the result; thousands dead, an economy and an insurgency funded by opium [and] rampant corruption.”

After 16 years, the Afghan government controls only 57 percent of the country’s districts, according to a report from SIGAR, the U.S. government’s top watchdog organization in Afghanistan. Though the number of U.S. casualties is relatively low, the dirty secret of the war is the astonishing number of Afghans who are dying. The number of civilian casualties has already reached a record high this year, with at least 1,662 deaths and 3,581 wounded—many resulting from U.S. and Afghan airstrikes.

Moreover, there is a skyrocketing number of casualties sustained by the Afghan security forces, of which 807 were killed in the first six weeks of this year alone, according to SIGAR.

3. Mercenaries could play a big role in the coming surge

The White House has considered dramatically expanding the role of private contractors in the war. According to Erik Prince, former CEO of Blackwater/Xe/Academi, Trump has been in touch with him about a proposal in which thousands of US soldiers would be replaced with his private army of military contractors. Prince, the brother-in-law of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, has served as an advisor for Trump’s transition team and even as an unofficial envoy for the executive branch.

Though Prince boasts about how much leaner and more efficient private contractors are, they often cost taxpayers far more than US troops—sometimes three times as much. Furthermore, mercenaries like Blackwater contractors are exposed to far less transparency than U.S. soldiers.

4. Trump wants a piece of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth

The executive branch has made no secret of its interest in Afghanistan’s mineral deposits, which may amount to more than $1 trillion in total wealth. Afghanistan’s minerals are so bountiful that a recent report from Reuters claims the country has the potential to become “the Saudi Arabia of lithium.” One major problem: the Taliban controls much of the territory in which these minerals rest.

However, a study conducted by Afghanistan’s government estimates the nation’s mineral wealth is even more vast than previously imagined. A partial survey conducted by the Afghan Ministry of Mines and Petroleum claims the country’s mineral wealth is estimated at $3 trillion — more than enough to compensate for the war’s cost. Stephen Feinberg, the billionaire financier who owns the military contractor DynCorp International, is informally advising the White House on Afghanistan according to a report in The New York Times, which said the company may potentially play a role in safeguarding American mining operations.

5. An Afghan strategy that ignores Pakistan is doomed to fail

In 2016 alone, the US gave $550 million in military aid to Pakistan—a country that has been propping up the Taliban for years. In fact, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, quoting an Afghan security forces official, said in December 2016 that if the Taliban didn’t have sanctuary in Pakistan, “they would not last a month.”

Though Trump’s address included vague talk about getting tough on Pakistan, it did not include any specific proposals for how he would do that. It’s unlikely that any foreseeable amount of US troops would be able to defeat the Taliban without the support of the Pakistanis.

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“Narco-State Afghanistan” Leads to Heroin Addiction in the USA

NOVANEWS

White House Makes a Big Deal of New Heroin Efforts–But Says Nothing about Stemming the Flow or Why We’re Still at War in Narco-State Afghanistan

On March 29, 2016 the White House issued a press release on its new heroin initiative.  The Washington Post described how much Obama proposed to do.  The long list of fixes and new public-private partnerships relate almost exclusively to treatment.  The 1 billion dollars, Obama said, will treat “tens of thousands” of addicts.

Additional treatment is desperately needed, but the money won’t go far.  The White House and RANDsaid in 2014 that the US had 800,000–2.4 million heroin addicts. Treatment requires many months, or years, and costs tens of thousands of dollars per person. The new funding will support less than 10% of those needing treatment.

Speaking at the National Prescription Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, Obama … called addiction a “heartbreaking” issue that’s costing lives and devastating communities across the country.

But he said: “I’m very optimistic that we can solve it.”

Yeah right.  Till you get it off the street, bro, you ain’t done shit.

And can you be as glib, Mr. President, at explaining why you completely left out efforts to reduce the US heroin supply?

From Wired, we learn that Obama ended (yes, ended) Afghan opium eradication soon after taking office:

In 2009, in one of his first major war policy decisions since becoming president, Barack Obama oversaw an end to U.S. poppy eradication… Without American support, Afghan government counter-narcotic operations withered to a merely symbolic scale. Kabul’s agents would raze one acre of a 10-acre plot and call it “eradicated.”

And that’s when the US heroin epidemic really took off, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse:

[GR editor’s Note: the rise in heroin addiction is functionally related to the increase in opium production in Afghanistan, see table below:]

See:  Michel Chossudovsky, The Spoils of War: Afghanistan’s Multibillion Dollar Heroin Trade, Washington’s Hidden Agenda: Restore the Drug Trade,

Global Research, 14 May 2005

Aerial poppy eradication is off the table, according to the State Department, and the US no longer supports Afghan national counter-narcotics efforts. Hello?

Mr. President:  Please explain how and why you pulled the wool over the eyes of the American people by claiming the Taliban are in charge of Afghan opium?  Why didn’t you tell the truth: that they tax the acreage used to grow the crop?  (As do anti-Taliban militias in areas they control.) This is akin to property taxes.

Somebody else actually buys the opium, converts it to heroin, and brings it to the US, where it sells for over 1,000 times what the Taliban received in taxes.

Who, Mr. President, collects the big money?  Who buys the opium harvest, protects the movement of opium, its conversion to heroin, and ships it over here, undetected? Last I heard, the US installed much of the Afghan government and patrolled a lot of poppy fields.  Afghanistan is where between 75% and 93% of the world’s illicit opium is grown each year, on 500,000 (undisturbed) acres.

Funny how after spending 100 billion dollars on Afghan reconstruction, over $8 billion on opium eradication, and several trillion dollars on our 15 year Afghan war, the acreage under poppies has only expanded.  Funny about that.

Funny, too, is that big question mark… why are we still in Afghanistan?  I thought we went to get Bin Laden.  Well, he’s history.

Can someone explain our military objective for Afghanistan?  How do we justify this longest war in the 240 year history of our nation?

Writing about the Afghanistan war in National Defense magazine in 2009, Lawrence P. Farrell noted,

“Seldom do we hear or read a discussion of what the “political objective” should be or even whether anyone has articulated the political aims for the use of military force in that country.”

In 2010 General Petraeus was interviewed for the Council on Foreign Relations about this. He claimed that “our military’s operational objective [was] nation-building, euphemistically called counterinsurgency…”

Nation-building?  Back during the Vietnam war, we used a different expression to say the same thing:  “We had to destroy the village in order to save it.”  During the Vietnam war, most US heroin came from poppies grown in Southeast Asia.

Some of this heroin arrived in the US on military planes, inside the body bags of fallen soldiers. It was loaded onto planes at US military bases in Vietnam, and unloaded at military bases in the US. Somebody in the government knew what was going on.

At fourteen years into the Afghan war, in October 2015, USAT reported,

“The president said he does not believe in “endless war,” but there remains an opportunity to forge a stable country that can prevent the emergence of future threats, an effort in which more than 2,200 Americans have given their lives.”

Face it.  The expressed reasons for our continuing adventure in Afghanistan are smoke and mirrors, nothing more.

Vietnam was a war in which the number of US soldiers who had lost their lives was oft-repeated as a justification to keep the war going. Vietnam was another war with fuzzy objectives, supposedly fought for a discredited “Domino Theory.” But perhaps there are good reasons why the lessons of Vietnam seem to have been ignored.

Few people know that Afghanistan hides immense underground wealth. But first it must be wrested from the Afghans. Heroin aside, two financial blockbusters are just waiting to be tapped.

1.  The value of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth was estimated at one trillion dollars by NPR, and at 3 trillion dollars by Bloomberg. This almost certainly impacted Russia’s failed takeover of Afghanistan.

“Afghanistan, with certainty I can say, in 20 years is going to be a mining country,” Paul Brinkley, head of a Pentagon group called the Task Force for Business Stability Operations, tells NPR’s Rachel Martin. “That is going to happen.”

2.   Pipeline construction, which has been on the table for the last 20 years, would move oil and gas from the Caspian basin to the Arabian Sea.  The region’s proven gas and oil reserves are huge, and equal to those in the US.  To finally reach the ocean, an oil or gas pipeline must cross through Afghanistan, or else through Iran.

From The Diplomat comes a telling quote:

“It is, therefore, little surprise that some experts contend that the country is not transitioning from “war to peace,” but rather from “military conflict to resource conflict.’”

Obama needs to “forge a stable country” to prevent pipelines from being tapped or blown up, and protect future mining operations.

3.  Don’t forget that Afghanistan’s half million acres of poppy fields generate heroin worth roughly $200 billion dollars on the street, year after year. Unlike minerals and gas, this is a truly renewable resource.

Is the Afghan war–the longest American war–just about opium, minerals and pipelines? I could be missing some of the picture. Maybe I have oversimplified things. But phenomenal resources, still untapped, have to count as the lurking, almost-never-discussed elephant in the Afghan war room.

If the US government had reasonable political and military objectives, wouldn’t the government have provided a coherent account of its objectives by now?  In the absence of any meaningful explanation for this war, the only reason we remain there, with no prospect of getting out, is to secure control of Afghanistan’s resources for the US.  Or, more correctly, for the oligarchs who control US policy and who will reap the benefits–while the people of the US (and Afghanistan, much more so) pay the costs.

FACT:  the land under poppy cultivation has tripled since the US entered Afghanistan in 2001, helped by US spending for wells, roads and “reconstruction.”.

Connect the dots.  As the pipeline project grows, so will our military commitment.

But there is one little bright spot.  It is a Presidential election year, and the candidates do have to answer questions.  I’m going to try and put their feet to the fire.  Will you do the same?

Ask the Presidential candidates to explain what we are doing in Afghanistan.

Who owns Afghan mineral rights?  Who is invested in Afghan pipelines?

Will the next President change course, and get seriously behind drug interdiction and eradication in Afghanistan?  How will the US government act to get Afghan (and all) heroin off our streets? How many soldiers must continue to die to protect the right to loot Afghanistan?

The huge tide of addiction blows right back from our rapacious Afghan policy. Over 10,000 Americans were lost to heroin in 2014. Deaths continue to climb.  In my state, Maine, deaths from heroin surpassed deaths from prescription drugs for the first time in 2015.

Even children of the rich and powerful are being fed to the demon heroin. Will the costs of our Afghan policy ever be too high for our policymakers to bear?

Author’s note: The 2 earlier pieces I wrote regarding the heroin epidemic are here and here and they add to these ideas and documentation.  My mentors in this effort are Peter Dale Scott, Alfred McCoy, Michel Chossudovsky and Sibel Edmonds. Thanks also to William Edstrom for reminding me we can fight back.

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Heroin Dealer in Chief. Afghanistan, Source of 90% of The World’s Heroin

NOVANEWS

First published by GR in 2015

A heroin surge is shocking and awing Americans, 165,000 of who will be killed the next ten years. How does 415,000 kilograms (913,000 pounds) of heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan get to US each year?

Opium Wars I & II were British troops forcing farmers in India and Pakistan, colonies of Britain then, to grow opium which Brits pushed on the Chinese to try to make China a colony of Britain too. In the 1980’s, CIA grifters flew weapons to Contras in Nicaragua and flew crack cocaine back to the USA . The DEA did nothing to stop CIA felons from dealing crack in the USA.

CIA organized, trained and armed the Mujahideen (later re-named Taliban) to fight a 1979 Soviet invasion into Afghanistan and to push heroin on Russians. CIA contracted NLC trucks to send weapons through Pakistan to Afghanistan and to bring heroin back. After Soviet withdrawal, Taliban took control of Afghanistan’s government.

Afghans (who earn $55 a month on average), given choices between starving, freezing or growing opium they get pennies a pound for, often choose the latter. The Taliban outlawed opium in 2000. Afghan opium farmland decreased from 91,000 hectares (1999) to 7,600 hectares (2001).

Why did US invade Afghanistan in 2001? Iraq was invaded because Bush, Rumsfeld etc. claimed Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. Which was a lie. Another reason, Bush gets bored by peace. (Satan also gets bored by peace if I’m recalling my Sunday School classes correctly.)

September 11, 2001, nineteen terrorists (15 Saudi Arabians, 2 from United Arab Emirates, 1 Egyptian and 1 Lebanese) killed 2,977 people by crashing hijacked airplanes in US. The terrorists got their training at Huffman Aviation flight school in Florida. Government officials decided to attack, not Saudi Arabia where most terrorists come from, but Afghanistan. Why? The government narrative has been sketchy.

Afghanistan became the #1 worldwide producer of opium and heroin by 1995. The CIA created Taliban government exported opium and heroin to IranRussia and China addicting millions, causing enormous economic damages, heroin-fueled crime waves plus deadly epidemics (AIDS, Hepatitis C).

Have CIA officers recruited agents in Iran, Russia or China? Is it easier to recruit heroin addicts? Would CIA officers dangling taxpayers cash or heroin at addicts help to make them agents? US schools are mandated for 13 years, when we learn things like cause, effect, motives, means, logic, reasoning, deductive reasoning. Of course it’s easier to recruit addicts. Why not recruit sober agents instead, is it because sober people are not interested in working for the US government.

Afghanistan, source of 90% of Earth’s heroin, ended 90% of Earth’s heroin problems when Taliban outlawed opium in 2000. The reason for War in Afghanistan was because Taliban outlawed opium growing which ended economic wars (opium wars) against Iran, Russia and China.

The world’s heroin market collapsed by 2001, producing a heroin drought. War in Afghanistan was “to restore the CIA sponsored drug trade to its historic levels and exert direct control over the drug routes.”. The Afghanistan War was CIA retaliation against Taliban for outlawing opium.

There’s a tactic called ‘flatten tire fix tire.’ Pop someone’s car tire then appear to “help” when the flat’s discovered. Clever huh? A more evil variant of ‘flatten tire fix tire’ is hooking people on drugs, then appearing, cash or drugs in hand, when users need a fix.

More evil, physically torturing innocent people causing severe chronic pain (e.g. forcing innocent people to sit on the floor, legs crossed, hands cuffed behind their backs, banging their heads to the floor, repeatedly, snapping spines), then dangling painkillers until they become addicted, needing painkillers for chronic pain caused by US government-sponsored torture. There’re many layers to the onion which is opium war being waged.

Brits waged old school opium war, US government’s waging opium war now. 90% of Earth’s heroin comes from occupied Afghanistan. US government’s been occupying Afghanistan since 2001.

When investigating serious crimes, like heroin dealing killing 165,000 Americans a decade, means and motives are revealing. US military and CIA had the means to overturn Taliban’s opium ban (which they did) and transport tons of heroin into US each week. Motives point to whodunit, who’s transporting this heroin into US to kill 165,000 Americans.

A Revolutionary War was fought for rights like taxation with representation. Trillions were spent on War in Afghanistan because Taliban outlawed opium. 2,372 US Soldiers killed in Afghanistan. Thousands of Veterans committed suicide. Hundreds of thousands became disabled. Secret police agencies not saying what’s what means we don’t have taxation with representation. Again.

OPIUM WAR III.

Can Americans have democracy, a nationwide ballot referendum to vote if we want to wage opium war against others and against US? Tens of millions of innocent lives were destroyed because of heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan. The War in Afghanistan began as an opium war against Iran, Russia and China, the tables are turning into an opium war against Americans on track to kill 165,000 Americans (2016-2026).

Americans, 5% of Earth’s population, take 60% of painkillers on Earth. USA #1 for heroin addiction now too. US government and corporate executives are waging opium war. Against US. Americans are the most drugged people on Earth.

US government installed Hamid Karzai, CIA agent, as Afghanistan’s President in 2002 to restore the drug trade. Ahmed Wali Karzaiheroin dealer, was Hamid’s brother. “The Afghan narcotics economy was a carefully designed project of the CIA”. “A convicted heroin trafficker, Izzatullah Wasifi, was appointed by Karzai to head an anti-corruption agency.” US government made Afghanistan into a narco state. By 2006, LA Times reported Afghan heroin flooding in, but wouldn’t investigate how. 1,000,000 people worldwide have been killed by heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan.

189,000 Americans were heroin addicts in 2001. White House reported 1,500,000 US heroin addicts by 2010. That figure shot up (2010-2015) to 2,500,000 heroin addicts.

Afghan opium spread from 7,600 hectares (2001) to 224,000 hectares (2014). US heroin deaths skyrocketed 1,779 (2001) to 10,574 (2014) and are on track to hit 16,500 in 2016.

Year #, Afghan opium hectares, # US heroin addicts, # US heroin deaths (by year)

Click for pictures of US soldiers guarding Afghan opium.

2,500,000 heroin addicts plus 2,000,000 casual heroin users means 1/70 Americans use heroin. Crime waves are surging, ruining families and neighborhoods, shocking and awing victims being robbed and sometimes killed by addicts craving another piece of heroin pie from US-occupied Afghanistan.

Hepatitis C, a deadly virus, is surging; users share needles. Sovaldi, a Gilead Biosciences drug, costing $84,000, cures Hep C. 200,000 users catching Hep C annually means $16,500,000,000 added profit for Gilead Biosciences annually. Donald Rumsfeld was Gilead Biosciences CEO before becoming Secretary of Defense in 2001.

Pure heroin costs $450/gram in the USA. Regular users take 400 mg daily, light users as little as 25 mg, heavy users a few grams. 1,000 Americans try heroin their first time every day.

224,000 hectares of Afghan opium can make 560,000 kilograms of heroin annually. $450/gram x 1,000 x 560,000 equals $252,000,000,000 cold hard cash annually. $252,000,000,000 makes the fattest 6-figure gravy train government salary look like chump change. $252 billion annually dealing heroin could supplement CIA’s Congressional financing (or be Plan B for CIA financing).

52,833 US heroin deaths occurred (2001-2014). US heroin deaths quadrupled (2002-2013), doubling from 2010 to 2013, and are slated to double again (2013-2016). Heroin deaths will kill 165,000 Americans (2016-2026). Plus thousands more from heroin-related diseases and heroin-fueled robberies and home invasions. $252 billion from Afghan heroin is blood money, your hands are covered in blood.

In 2013, an American died every 64 minutes from heroin, now, an American dies every 32 minutes. Americans being killed at a rate of 165,000 per decade by Afghan heroin is triple the 55,000 Americans killed in the Vietnam War (1965-1975).

Government officials, claiming War in Afghanistan was somehow supposed to make us safer against terrorism, which killed 2,977, need to answer how is killing 165,000 Americans saving 2,977Americans?

2,500,000 US addicts x 0.4 grams daily x 365 days/year equals 365,000 kilograms. Light users take 50,000 kilograms annually. US heroin demand is 415,000 kilograms annually. 166,000 hectares of opium are needed to make 415,000 kilograms of heroin. 1 hectare = 25 kilograms opium = 2.5 kilograms heroin.

DEA’s 2015 Heroin Threat Assessment focuses on 7% of US heroin from Latin America. Why’s DEA focusing on only 7%? Why’s DEA silent, dead silent, about the other 93%? They don’t want to upset the Afghan heroin cart.

(Approximately 3% comes from Southeast Asia or synthetic sources.)

Why are DEA bosses (tacitly) approving 90% of heroin in US from US-occupied Afghanistan? How high up in government does this heroin dealing racket go? Why did DEA do nothing (1980’s) to combat crack cocaine from Latin America flown into USA on CIA planes? DEA hasn’t been held accountable, while CIA grifters made billions dealing crack in US. The Treasury Department, another finger of the same glove, did nothing about billions in tax-free cash made by CIA felons. Tax evasion is a felony too. No red flags when CIA officers get megabucks in excess of their government salaries?

$252 billion a year worth of Afghan heroin is big business blood money. Overdoses are 40x more likely from heroin than other illicit drugs like cocaine; overdoses are 3x more likely from heroin than from pharmaceutical painkillers. If heroin users switched to pharmaceuticals, 110,000 Americans would be saved each decade. A restoration of the Taliban government in Afghanistan would end Afghan opium production, the heroin epidemic would end, and 165,000 Americans would be saved each decade.

Could US heroin come from anywhere but US-occupied Afghanistan? No. The small fraction of heroin from places like Myanmar and Mexico isn’t enough to feed the American heroin appetite. The White House declared 10,500 hectares of opium in Mexico and 1,100 hectares in Colombia produces 28,000 kilograms of heroin annually. The most USA can import from Latin America is 28,000 kilograms, not enough for 1/10 of US heroin addicts. The White House omitted mention of 224,000 hectares of Afghan opium.

Only one country on Earth, US-occupied Afghanistan, grows enough opium to supply the American heroin habit. Current facts and figures about countries growing illicit opium:

All countries growing illicit opium, other than US-occupied Afghanistan, can produce 198,000 kilograms of heroin, not enough for even half of US heroin demand. Of these 198,000 kilograms, Vietnam, China, Pakistan and Iran’s opium is exclusively for domestic consumption. The balance, 192,000 kilograms, that can come from Myanmar, Laos, Mexico, Colombia and Tajikistan, mostly goes to Asian, Latin American, Australian and European markets.

Most heroin in the US comes from US-occupied Afghanistan, there is no other physical possibility to explain where all this heroin comes from. There is no other mathematical possibility to explain where all this heroin comes from.

62% of Afghans are illiterate. There are no Afghan chemical factories. Acetic anhydride, needed to make heroin, is imported. Stopping imports of acetic anhydride stops the manufacturing of heroin. US government enabled (or facilitated) acetic anhydride imports. Who’s selling? Who’s buying? Purchase records exist.

US methaqualone (Quaalude) deaths dropped from 117 (1980) to 0 (1990). A Presidential scandalpredated methaqualone’s ban, when Dr. Bourne, White House Drug Abuse Adviser, wrote a Quaalude prescription for a White House Assistant. This drug scandal may have cost Democrats the White House in 1980. The success in outlawing methaqualone was outlawing chemicals to manufacture methaqualone. Likewise, acetic anhydride can be outlawed.

Indisputable facts: US invaded Afghanistan in 2001, has occupied Afghanistan since, Afghan opium spread from 7,600 hectares (2001) to 224,000 hectares currently, US-occupied Afghanistan is by far the #1 heroin producer worldwide, the Afghanistan War (longest war in US history) cost over a million lives, a trillion dollars and has destroyed tens of millions of lives.

How does heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan get to US? The simplest and fastest way is airplane. US military and CIA-chartered airplanes fly from US-occupied Afghanistan to US every week. People getting on military and CIA planes aren’t searched. People getting off military and CIA planes aren’t searched. It’s a simple matter of will if military and CIA people wish to bring heroin to US. They’ve gotten Hail Mary passes.

MEANS & MOTIVES.

A CIA source confirmed CIA “big boys” are transporting heroin from Afghanistan to the USA. Before 2009, CIA heroin shipments were smaller and more sporadic. After 2009, CIA heroin shipments into the US were “green lighted” becoming larger and more regular.

Since 2010, US policy permits opium growing. Each Afghan opium hectare equals 15 US heroin addicts plus 1 American heroin death each decade. Kalitta and Aero are but two contractors which have routinely flown from US-occupied Afghanistan to US.

CIA people are not serving and protecting US. CIA people serve and protect themselves. Only. There are no checks and balances on intel agencies, they’re military or paramilitary (“just following orders”) and they repeat “national security” to try to ward off oversight and effective checks and balances.

CIA people were arrested burglarizing and bugging Democratic Party Headquarters at the Watergate Hotel to fix the 1972 Presidential elections. CIA people try fixing elections and picking politicians worldwide, US included. One Watergate burglar, Hunt, was involved with President Kennedy’s murderin 1963, when CIA did a coup in the USA.

Congressional hearings then oversight committees, with limited power, began after Watergate. Former Senate Intelligence Oversight Chair Rockefeller lamented “I only get what they want to give me”. Senator Moynihan introduced legislation to abolish CIA in 1991 and 1995, because CIA, a lawless secret police agency, means a US secret police state. CIA is incompatible with free democracy. Former Secretary of State Acheson warned about CIA, “I had the gravest forebodings about this organization and warned the President that as set up neither he, the National Security Council, nor anyone else would be in a position to know what it was doing or to control it.”

The list of who has the means to transport tons of Afghan heroin to US each week is a short list. Military and CIA.

US military may transport heroin, although there’s no large-scale history of military transporting drugs. CIA has a history dealing drugs. CIA smuggled heroin (1970’s) in Soldier body bags from Vietnam. Much of the heroin flooding into US from US-occupied Afghanistan is coming in with CIA felons on CIA aircraft just as much of the cocaine that came into US from Nicaragua came in with CIA felons on CIA aircraft (1980’s).

The President is responsible for CIA. The buck stops with Obama for 35,470 US heroin deaths (2009-2014) and all crimes committed by CIA since 2009.

CIA has a history of harmingharassingswarmingblackmailingblacklistingassaultingmurderingpoisoning, committing felonies, drug dealingtorturing, menacing, terrorizingexperimenting on peopleand worse. CIA’s been on a mass murder spree since before MLK’s murder. CIA is a cult of death. They’re thugs and killers.

CIA is an organization of grifters, professional con men and con women. 90% of CIA officers are in USA. Few CIA officers go abroad, unless there’s something like billions of dollars in heroin ready to deal. CIA people are psychopathsthievesprostitutes, pimps, sex traffickersdrug dealersmass murderers and worse. They feel no remorse, psychopaths don’t have the capacity to feel remorse for their crimes. They fear getting busted and punished for their crimes. CIA people make national insecurity. They make more money and get more power for each new national insecurity and each new enemy they make.

To figure out whodunit, dealing millions of pounds of Afghan heroin to kill 165,000 Americans a decade, means and motives are key. Military and CIA foxes guarding the opium house are prime suspects. CIA people are grifters, they grift, lie, deceive, omit truth, con, trick, cheat, sexually assault, attempt to rape, rapeforced bestialitypromote prostitution, sex traffic, attempt to murder, murder, serial kill, mass murder, rob, steal, terrorize, menace, gang stalk, brutalize, torture, blacklistblackmailexperiment on peopledeal drugs and worse. What else does CIA smuggle besides drugs, anyone or anything can be smuggled on drug routes. CIA felons smuggled kilos of heroin from Vietnam to US (1970’s) in Soldier’s body bags. CIA felons make money dealing drugs. CIA dealing tons of crack cocaine in the USA (1980’s) was a dry run for CIA dealing thousands of tons of heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan (2001-present).

Is military dealing heroin too? Only way to find out is honest law enforcement monitoring and searching government people, planes and ships. State police maybe better suited since DEA has a history approving CIA drug dealing in USA, DEA’s been busy at sex partiesFBI approved millions of CIA felonies (1947-present) and often ganged up with CIA to harass, harm, terrorize, brutalize, blacklist, blackmail, torture (and worse) journalists, whistleblowers, candidates, dissidents, activists, clergy and a whole host of other Americans, MLK to present.

If investigated, CIA would take evasive measures like 3 card montes transferring heroin plane to plane (or ship) in transit. Some Afghan heroin is already routed through Mexico. CIA agent John Abbotsfordstated “We run the Afghan opium trade.” Afghan heroin dealer Toor Jan described how heroin’s sold to government translators to government officials who ship heroin on government planes from Kandahar’s Military Airbase.

After 14 years of occupation, investigators can begin searching government people, planes and vessels and can monitor opium seedlings to heroin in transit. All that’s needed is honest enough investigators. Has the USA become too much of a Pablo Escobar-Scarface banana republic to accomplish that?

General Martinez took down Escobar’s cartel. People, like Martinez, can take down the CIA drug cartel the way Escobar’s cartel was taken down. If only a few hundred CIA “bad apples” deal heroin then there should be no problem. Afghanistan’s government in 2000 outlawed opium and within a year it was all but gone. Why can’t US and US “supported” Afghan government do the same now? How high up are heroin dealing profits going in US government?

Commander in Chief Obama can conduct full investigations and thorough monitoring of military and CIA. Or Obama can do nothing and have a legacy as Heroin Dealer In Chief.

Government people claiming American lives so sacred, using scare tactics and terror tactics to scare and terrorize us that a secret police state must be constructed, trillions in more taxes spent plus endless war to save 2,977American lives from ever again being killed in terrorist attacks, their claims are obvious lies and hypocrisy if they do nothing about 165,000 Americans being killed by heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan.

US government (DEA, FBI) protects CIA drug dealers and goes after their competitors (non-CIA dealers) gangster styleISIS now deals some Afghan heroin. CIA, unable to win hearts and minds anywhere, lost some of it’s Afghan heroin trade to ISIS.

Obama singlehandedly controls the world’s largest known drug manufacturing, transporting and distribution network and Obama’s Central Intelligence Agency has an over 50 year long association with being the most powerful and dangerous global drug cartel.”

War in Afghanistan killed 2,372 Soldiers, many Veterans and 52,833 Americans from heroin (2001-2014). By transporting heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan to US, CIA’s not protecting Americans, they’re doing the opposite of protecting. CIA killed 55,105 Americans and destroyed millions of lives, so far, because of the Afghanistan War.

The buck stops with US Chief Executive Obama for what people working for CIA, an executive agency, have done since 2009. Every count of sex trafficking, promotion of prostitution, attempted rape, rape (raping underage boys on US bases), assault, murder, torture, US government sponsored terrorism, drug dealing, all crimes committed or caused by CIA are because of Obama’s actions or negligence. Stop the crimes. Enough is enough. Stop it already.

Obama’s mother worked in Indonesia, a CIA battleground in the seemingly endless war on communism, where millions of innocent people were murdered. Some say she was CIA, she stated she did charity work for charities like the Ford Foundation. Obama worked at a known CIA front company, Business International Corporation. Was Obama CIA? Putin’s man enough to publicly state he was KGB, can Obama publicly state if he worked for CIA?

President Bush was CIA Director. President Bush II, son of a CIA director. If 3/4 of recent Presidents were CIA before their “elections”, is CIA picking our Presidents for us (rigging ballots, sabotaging campaigns, fixing elections) like they did in 1972? Press freedom (USA #49) means looking beyond the windows (and window dressing) at who are the deep state corporate executives and unelected government officials, what they’re doing, planning, why, bribes, charities, lobbyists, speech and book paymentsbanks laundering their money and so forth.

This report’s about 2 parts of government which made war in Afghanistan (military and CIA), why (retaliation against Taliban for outlawing opium, to poison millions of innocent people with heroin and profits from a heroin dealing opium war), why Afghan opium fields expanded from 7,600 hectares to 224,000 hectares (to poison millions of innocent people with heroin, wage economic warfare and $252 billion annually dealing heroin), the explosion of heroin (from 189,000 to 2,500,000 US heroin addicts), US heroin deaths shooting up (1,779 in 2001 to 10,574 (2014) to 165,000 Americans to be killed (2016-2026)), means, motives and how heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan gets to US: CIA planes(and possibly military planes too).

What can be done: a new agency solely to investigate government criminality, outlaw Afghan opium and search government people, planes and ships. The many ineffective and corrupt people at agencies like DEA and FBI can be let go, new people with integrity can be hired. CIA can be abolished, their tasks re-assigned to State Department. State Police can assist searching people, planes, ships and investigating anyone exiting US government facilities for trafficking (drug sniffing dogs, ask questions like have you been in US-occupied Afghanistan, heroin capital of the world). Improved drug policy can reduce dealer profit motives, reduce drug impurities and inconsistencies (overdose causes), decriminalize personal possession like Portugal did and more treatment programs.

Afghan heroin killed 53,833 Americans (2001-2014). This 14-year Afghanistan War is one sick twisted and highly lethal US government failure of “keeping Americans safe.” Government actions and inactions in US-occupied Afghanistan killed 55,105 Americans (Soldier and heroin deaths). Obviously, government has other motives than “keeping Americans safe.” The Afghanistan War is lingering on for so long because of $252 billion cash annually from the heroin there.

Afghan heroin is on track to kill 165,000 Americans (2016-2026). In 2000, Afghanistan’s government, the Taliban, outlawed opium and within a year it was all but gone. Commander In Chief Obama can do that and if he doesn’t then beyond any shadow of doubt he’s the Heroin Dealer In Chief.

Tons of heroin from US-occupied Afghanistan get into US each week. Government planes have flown un-searched every week from US-occupied Afghanistan to US (2001-present). Commander In Chief Obama can bring about effective monitoring and searching of government people, planes and ships. Stat. As if 165,000 American lives depend on that, because 165,000 American lives do depend on that. If Obama refuses to effectively monitor and search government people, planes and ships, then no doubt he’s Heroin Dealer In Chief.

Obama has the blood of 35,470 Americans (heroin deaths 2009-2014) on his hands for either his willful actions “green lighting” heroin transport from US-occupied Afghanistan to US or his negligence in allowing these fatal felonies.

If this heroin epidemic coming from US-occupied Afghanistan hasn’t ended by January 2017, then Obama’s legacy will be Barack Hussein Obama II, Heroin Dealer In Chief. All previous drug epidemics came from drugs flooding in from sovereign nations abroad. This highly lethal opium war of a heroin epidemic is the first ever drug epidemic to invade US from a US-occupied nation, Afghanistan.

Posted in AfghanistanComments Off on Heroin Dealer in Chief. Afghanistan, Source of 90% of The World’s Heroin

“The War is Worth Waging”: Afghanistan’s Vast Reserves of Minerals and Natural Gas

NOVANEWS

The War on Afghanistan is a Profit driven “Resource War”.

 

Author’s Note

US and NATO forces invaded Afghanistan almost 16 years ago in October 2001. It’s has been a continuous war marked by US military occupation.

The justification is “counterterrorism”.  Afghanistan is defined as a state sponsor of terrorism, allegedly responsible for attacking America on September 11, 2001. 

The war on Afghanistan continues to be heralded as a war of retribution in response to the 9/11 attacks. US troops are still present and deployed in Afghanistan.

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The legal argument used by Washington and NATO to invade and occupy Afghanistan under “the doctrine of collective security” was that the September 11 2001 attacks constituted an undeclared “armed attack” “from abroad” by an unnamed foreign power, namely Afghanistan. 

Yet there were no Afghan fighter planes in the skies of New York on the morning of September 11, 2001. 

This article, first published in June 2010, points to the “real economic reasons”  why US-NATO forces invaded Afghanistan in the wake of 9/11.  

Under the Afghan-US security pact,  established under Obama’s Asian pivot, Washington and its NATO partners have established a permanent military presence in Afghanistan, with military facilities located within proximity of China’s Western frontier.  The pact was intended to allow the US to maintain their nine permanent military bases, strategically located on the borders of  China, Pakistan and Iran as well as Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.

In recent developments, President Trump in his February 28, 2017 address to a joint session of  Congress vowed to “demolish and destroy” terrorist groups in Syria and Iraq as well as in Afghanistan under a fake counter-terrorism mandate.

According to Foreign Affairs, “there are more U.S. military forces deployed there [Afghanistan] than to any other active combat zone” and their mandate is to go after the Taliban, Al Qaeda and ISIS (which are supported covertly by US intelligence). 

There is both a geopolitical as well as an economic agenda in Afghanistan requiring the permanent presence of US troops.

In addition to its vast mineral and gas reserves, Afghanistan produces more than 90 percent of the World’s supply of opium which is used to produce grade 4 heroin.

US military bases in Afghanistan are also intent upon protecting the multibillion narcotics trade.  Narcotics, at present, constitutes the centerpiece of Afghanistan’s export economy.

The heroin trade, instated at the outset of the Soviet-Afghan war in 1979 and protected by the CIA, generates cash earnings in Western markets in excess of $200 billion dollars a year.

“The highest concentration of NATO servicemen in Afghanistan is being accompanied with the highest concentration of opium poppy, ….  That situation causes doubts about the anti-terrorist mission and leads to the conclusion about catastrophic consequences of the eight-year stay [of coalition forces] in Afghanistan,” (Russia’s Federal Drug Control Service head Viktor Ivanov, January 2010)

Michel Chossudovsky,  August 22, 2017

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“The War is Worth Waging”: Afghanistan’s Vast Reserves of Minerals and Natural Gas

The War on Afghanistan is a Profit driven “Resource War”.

By Prof Michel Chossudovsky

October 2010

The 2001 bombing and invasion of Afghanistan has been presented to World public opinion as a “Just War”, a war directed against the Taliban and Al Qaeda, a war to eliminate “Islamic terrorism” and instate Western style democracy.

The economic dimensions of  the “Global War on Terrorism” (GWOT) are rarely mentioned. The post 9/11 “counter-terrorism campaign” has served to obfuscate the real objectives of the US-NATO war.

The war on Afghanistan is part of a profit driven agenda: a war of economic conquest and plunder,  “a resource war”.

While Afghanistan is acknowledged as a strategic hub in Central Asia, bordering on the former Soviet Union, China and Iran, at the crossroads of pipeline routes and major oil and gas reserves, its huge mineral wealth as well as its untapped natural gas reserves have remained, until June 2010, totally unknown to the American public.

According to a joint report by the Pentagon, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and USAID, Afghanistan is now said to possess “previously unknown” and untapped mineral reserves, estimated authoritatively to be of the order of one trillion dollars (New York Times, U.S. Identifies Vast Mineral Riches in Afghanistan – NYTimes.com, June 14, 2010, See also BBC, 14 June 2010).

The previously unknown deposits — including huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold and critical industrial metals like lithium — are so big and include so many minerals that are essential to modern industry that Afghanistan could eventually be transformed into one of the most important mining centers in the world, the United States officials believe.

An internal Pentagon memo, for example, states that Afghanistan could become the “Saudi Arabia of lithium,” a key raw material in the manufacture of batteries for laptops and BlackBerrys.

The vast scale of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth was discovered by a small team of Pentagon officials and American geologists. The Afghan government and President Hamid Karzai were recently briefed, American officials said.

While it could take many years to develop a mining industry, the potential is so great that officials and executives in the industry believe it could attract heavy investment even before mines are profitable, providing the possibility of jobs that could distract from generations of war.

“There is stunning potential here,” Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the United States Central Command, said… “There are a lot of ifs, of course, but I think potentially it is hugely significant.”

The value of the newly discovered mineral deposits dwarfs the size of Afghanistan’s existing war-bedraggled economy, which is based largely on opium production and narcotics trafficking as well as aid from the United States and other industrialized countries. Afghanistan’s gross domestic product is only about $12 billion.

“This will become the backbone of the Afghan economy,” said Jalil Jumriany, an adviser to the Afghan minister of mines. (New York Times, op. cit.)

Afghanistan could become, according to The New York Times “the Saudi Arabia of lithium”. “Lithium is an increasingly vital resource, used in batteries for everything from mobile phones to laptops and key to the future of the electric car.” At present Chile, Australia, China and Argentina are the main suppliers of lithium to the world market. Bolivia and Chile are the countries with the largest known reserves of lithium. “The Pentagon has been conducting ground surveys in western Afghanistan. “Pentagon officials said that their initial analysis at one location in Ghazni province showed the potential for lithium deposits as large as those of Bolivia” (U.S. Identifies Vast Mineral Riches in Afghanistan – NYTimes.com, June 14, 2010, see also Lithium – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

“Previously Unknown Deposits” of Minerals in Afghanistan

The Pentagon’s near one trillion dollar “estimate” of previously “unknown deposits” is a useful smokescreen. The Pentagon one trillion dollar figure is more a trumped up number rather than an estimate:  “We took a look at what we knew to be there, and asked what would it be worth now in terms of today’s dollars. The trillion dollar figure seemed to be newsworthy.” (The Sunday Times, London, June 15 2010, emphasis added)

Moreover, the results of a US Geological Survey study (quoted in the Pentagon memo) on Afghanistan’s mineral wealth were revealed three years back, at a 2007 Conference organized by the Afghan-American Chamber of Commerce. The matter of Afghanistan’s mineral riches, however, was not considered newsworthy at the time.

The US Administration’s acknowledgment that it first took cognizance of Afghanistan’s vast mineral wealth  following the release of the USGS 2007 report is an obvious red herring. Afghanistan’s mineral wealth and energy resources (including natural gas) were known to both America’s business elites and the US government prior to the Soviet-Afghan war (1979-1988).

Geological surveys conducted by the Soviet Union in the 1970s and early 1980s confirm the existence of  vast reserves of copper (among the largest in Eurasia), iron, high grade chrome ore, uranium, beryl, barite, lead, zinc, fluorspar, bauxite, lithium, tantalum, emeralds, gold and silver.(Afghanistan, Mining Annual Review, The Mining Journal,  June, 1984). These surveys suggest that the actual value of these reserves could indeed be substantially larger than the one trillion dollars “estimate” intimated by the Pentagon-USCG-USAID study.

More recently, in a 2002 report, the Kremlin confirmed what was already known: “It’s no secret that Afghanistan possesses rich reserves, in particular of copper at the Aynak deposit, iron ore in Khojagek, uranium, polymetalic ore, oil and gas,” (RIA Novosti, January 6, 2002):

“Afghanistan has never been anyone’s colony – no foreigner had ever “dug” here before the 1950s. The Hindu Kush mountains, stretching, together with their foothills, over a vast area in Afghanistan, are where the minerals lie. Over the past 40 years, several dozen deposits have been discovered in Afghanistan, and most of these discoveries were sensational. They were kept secret, however, but even so certain facts have recently become known.

It turns out that Afghanistan possesses reserves of nonferrous and ferrous metals and precious stones, and, if exploited, they would possibly be able to cover even the earnings from the drug industry. The copper deposit in Aynak in the southern Afghan Helmand Province is said to be the largest in the Eurasian continent, and its location (40 km from Kabul) makes it cheap to develop. The iron ore deposit at Hajigak in the central Bamian Province yields ore of an extraordinarily high quality, the reserves of which are estimated to be 500m tonnes. A coal deposit has also been discovered not far from there.

Afghanistan is spoken of as a transit country for oil and gas. However, only a very few people know that Soviet specialists discovered huge gas reserves there in the 1960s and built the first gas pipeline in the country to supply gas to Uzbekistan. At that time, the Soviet Union used to receive 2.5 bn cubic metres of Afghan gas annually. During the same period, large deposits of gold, fluorite, barytes and marble onyxes that have a very rare pattern were found.

However, the pegmatite fields discovered to the east of Kabul are a real sensation. Rubies, beryllium, emeralds and kunzites and hiddenites that cannot be found anywhere else – the deposits of these precious stones stretch for hundreds of kilometres. Also, the rocks containing the rare metals beryllium, thorium, lithium and tantalum are of strategic importance (they are used in air and spacecraft construction).

The war is worth waging. … (Olga Borisova, “Afghanistan – the Emerald Country”, Karavan, Almaty, original Russian, translated by BBC News Services, Apr 26, 2002. p. 10, emphasis added.)

While public opinion was fed images of a war torn resourceless developing country, the realities are otherwise: Afghanstan is a rich country as confirmed by Soviet era geological surveys.

The issue of “previously unknown deposits” sustains a falsehood. It excludes Afghanstan’s vast mineral wealth as a justifiable casus belli. It says that the Pentagon only recently became aware that Afghanistan was among the World’s most wealthy mineral economies, comparable to The Democratic Republic of the Congo or former Zaire of the Mobutu era. The Soviet geopolitical reports were known. During the Cold War, all this information was known in minute detail:

… Extensive Soviet exploration produced superb geological maps and reports that listed more than 1,400 mineral outcroppings, along with about 70 commercially viable deposits … The Soviet Union subsequently committed more than $650 million for resource exploration and development in Afghanistan, with proposed projects including an oil refinery capable of producing a half-million tons per annum, as well as a smelting complex for the Ainak deposit that was to have produced 1.5 million tons of copper per year. In the wake of the Soviet withdrawal a subsequent World Bank analysis projected that the Ainak copper production alone could eventually capture as much as 2 percent of the annual world market. The country is also blessed with massive coal deposits, one of which, the Hajigak iron deposit, in the Hindu Kush mountain range west of Kabul, is assessed as one of the largest high-grade deposits in the world. (John C. K. Daly,  Analysis: Afghanistan’s untapped energy, UPI Energy, October 24, 2008, emphasis added)

Afghanistan’s Natural Gas

Afghanistan is a land bridge. The 2001 U.S. led invasion and occupation of Afghanistan has been analysed by critics of US foreign policy as a means to securing control  over the strategic trans-Afghan transport corridor which links the Caspian sea basin to the Arabian sea.

Several trans-Afghan oil and gas pipeline projects have been contemplated including the planned $8.0 billion TAPI pipeline project (Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India) of 1900 km., which would transport Turkmen natural gas across Afghanistan in what is described as a “crucial transit corridor”. (See Gary Olson, Afghanistan has never been the ‘good and necessary’ war; it’s about control of oil, The Morning Call, October 1, 2009). Military escalation under the extended Af-Pak war bears a relationship to TAPI. Turkmenistan possesses third largest natural gas reserves after Russia and Iran. Strategic control over the transport routes out of Turkmenistan have been part of Washington’s agenda since the collapse of the Soviet union in 1991.

What was rarely contemplated in pipeline geopolitics, however, is that Afghanistan is not only adjacent to countries which are rich in oil and natural gas (e.g Turkmenistan), it also possesses within its territory sizeable untapped reserves of natural gas, coal  and oil. Soviet estimates of the 1970s placed “Afghanistan’s ‘explored’ (proved plus probable) gas reserves at about 5  trillion cubic feet. The Hodja-Gugerdag’s initial reserves were placed at slightly more than 2 tcf.” (See, The Soviet Union to retain influence in Afghanistan, Oil & Gas Journal, May 2, 1988).

The US.Energy Information Administration (EIA) acknowledged in 2008 that Afghanistan’s natural gas reserves are “substantial”:

“As northern Afghanistan is a ‘southward extension of Central Asia’s highly prolific, natural gas-prone Amu Darya Basin,’ Afghanistan ‘has proven, probable and possible natural gas reserves of about 5 trillion cubic feet.’ (UPI, John C.K. Daly, Analysis: Afghanistan’s untapped energy, October 24, 2008)

From the outset of the Soviet-Afghan war in 1979, Washington’s objective has been to sustain a geopolitical foothold in Central Asia.

The Golden Crescent Drug Trade

America’s covert war, namely its support to the Mujahideen “Freedom fighters” (aka Al Qaeda) was also geared towards the development of the Golden Crescent trade in opiates, which was used by US intelligence to fund the insurgency directed against the Soviets.1

Instated at the outset of the Soviet-Afghan war and protected by the CIA, the drug trade developed over the years into a highly lucrative multibillion undertaking. It was the cornerstone of America’s covert war in the 1980s. Today, under US-NATO military occupation, the drug trade generates cash earnings in Western markets in excess of $200 billion dollars a year. (See Michel Chossudovsky, America’s War on Terrorism, Global Research, Montreal, 2005, see also Michel Chossudovsky, Heroin is “Good for Your Health”: Occupation Forces support Afghan Narcotics Trade, Global Research, April 29, 2007)

Towards an Economy of Plunder

The US media, in chorus, has upheld the “recent discovery” of Afghanistan’s mineral wealth as “a solution” to the development of the country’s war torn economy as well as a means to eliminating poverty. The 2001 US-NATO invasion and occupation has set the stage for their appropriation by Western mining and energy conglomerates.

The war on Afghanistan is  a profit driven “resource war”.

Under US and allied occupation, this mineral wealth is slated to be plundered, once the country has been pacified, by a handful of multinational mining conglomerates. According to Olga Borisova, writing in the months following the October 2001 invasion, the US-led “war on terrorism [will be transformed] into a colonial policy of influencing a fabulously wealthy country.” (Borisova, op cit).

Part of the US-NATO agenda is also to eventually take possession of Afghanistan’s reserves of natural gas, as well as prevent the development of competing Russian, Iranian and Chinese energy interests in Afghanistan.

Note

1. The Golden Crescent trade in opiates constitutes, at present, the centerpiece of Afghanistan’s export economy. The heroin trade, instated at the outset of the Soviet-Afghan war in 1979 and protected by the CIA, generates cash earnings in Western markets in excess of $200 billion dollars a year.

Since the 2001 invasion, narcotics production in Afghanistan  has increased more than 35 times. In 2009, opium production stood at 6900 tons, compared to less than 200 tons in 2001. In this regard, the multibillion dollar earnings resulting from the Afghan opium production largely occur outside Afghanistan. According to United Nations data, the revenues of the drug trade accruing to the local economy are of the order of 2-3 billion annually.

In contrast with the Worldwide sales of heroin resulting from the trade in Afghan opiates, in excess of $200 billion. (See Michel Chossudovsky, America’s War on Terrorism”, Global Research, Montreal, 2005)

ORDER DIRECTLY FROM GLOBAL RESEARCH

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America’s “War on Terrorism”

Michel Chossudovsky

Posted in USA, Europe, Afghanistan, UKComments Off on “The War is Worth Waging”: Afghanistan’s Vast Reserves of Minerals and Natural Gas

US Intention to Talk to Taliban Yet More Proof of ‘Double Standards’

NOVANEWS

US soldiers part of NATO patrol during the final day of a month long anti-Taliban operation by the Afghan National Army (ANA) in various parts of eastern Nangarhar province, at an Afghan National Army base in Khogyani district on August 30, 2015

© AFP 2017/ Noorullah Shirzada

The United States wants the Taliban to be part of the peaceful process in Afghanistan. According to expert Faruq Farda, the US is playing a double game and is not interested in settling the crisis.

“I think one of the things that the [State] Secretary feels very strongly about is trying to develop – get to a place where we can have some sort of a peace process,” State Secretary spokesperson Heather Nauert said at a press briefing in late July, commenting on State Secretary Rex Tillerson’s views on how to resolve the conflict in Afghanistan.

“And that means actually sitting down and talking with members of the Taliban and starting to facilitate that kind of dialogue,” Nauert added.

According to Kabul-based expert Faruq Farda, the possible talks between the US and the terrorist group are unlikely to be productive.”After the US invaded Afghanistan, it faced a number of problems and has finally decided to start negotiating with the Taliban. Washington sees such talks as the only way to resolve the crisis. The US was one of the originators of the Taliban. Now the organization is divided into smaller groups, which makes it difficult to control,” Farda told Sputnik Afghanistan.

According to the expert, what the US is doing in Afghanistan is a “policy of double standards.” While reiterating its commitment to peace, Washington, at the same time, wants to achieve geopolitical ambitions in the region.

“The US wants to turn the Taliban against Russia’s peaceful efforts. Moreover, the US involvement has not resolved a single problem in Afghanistan,” Farda said.

Commenting on the current situation in the country, the expert warned there is a risk of a large-scale conflict in the region.”The reason for the crisis is not the Afghan people. We want peace, but a war is being imposed on us. And this war risks expanding beyond Afghanistan and reaching Russia,” Farda said.

He further suggested that Russia could play the leading role in stabilizing the situation and bringing peace to Afghanistan.

“Russia is a global power that has been very influential in the global arena in recent years. Russia is one of the guarantors that maintain the global balance of powers. Russia should play a role in the settlement because the crisis in Afghanistan creates risks for Russia’s security,” Farda concluded.

US officials recently accused Russia of supporting the Taliban. Moreover, CNN claimed in July that it had exclusive videos purporting to show that the Taliban had allegedly received weaponry in Afghanistan, which appeared to have been supplied by Russia, however, presented no proof. Earlier, the director of the US Defense Intelligence Agency, Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, said that there was no evidence that Russia had transferred weapons or money to the Taliban in Afghanistan.The Russian Foreign Ministry denied the claims that Russia is allegedly supplying weapons to the Taliban as groundless.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that Moscow is only working with the Taliban in order to assist the implementation of a UN Security Council decision requested by the Afghan government that would allow the group to take a role in the political process. Lavrov also called accusations from the US that it is supplying the Taliban with weapons baseless and unprofessional.

Related:

Pentagon Unable to Comment on Claims of Alleged Russian Arms Supplies to Taliban
Moscow Calls Reports of Russia’s Alleged Arms Supplies to Taliban ‘Groundless’
Taliban Leader Demands US, NATO Troops Leave Afghanistan
Chaos at US State Dept. ‘Knee-Caps’ Efforts to End Afghanistan War – Report

Posted in USA, AfghanistanComments Off on US Intention to Talk to Taliban Yet More Proof of ‘Double Standards’

What’s Behind Russia’s Warning of ‘Resorting to Military Force’ in Afghanistan?

NOVANEWS

Afghan security forces leave after gunfire at the site of an attack in Kabul, Afghanistan July 31, 2017

© REUTERS/ Omar Sobhani

Despite efforts by the Afghan government and the US, Daesh (ISIS/ISIL) and the Taliban continue to gain ground in the country, threatening to import terrorism to the Central Asian states. Speaking to Sputnik, Afghan military analyst Atiqullah Amarkhel shared his views on whether Russia will intervene to tackle the terror threat.

Zamir Kabulov, a high rank career diplomat and Russian presidential envoy to Afghanistan, has recently remarked that if the Afghan government and Washington are unable to counter the threat posed by Daesh’s (ISIS/ISL) spread, Russia will resort to military force, Sputnik Afghanistan reported.

The Russian diplomat cited the fact that Daesh continues to strengthen its positions in Afghanistan, which triggers serious concerns in Moscow about the possibility of the spread of instability to the countries of Central Asia near Russia’s borders.

Kabulov also referred to recent reports regarding the alleged delivery of weapons to Daesh extremists by unidentified helicopters.

According to the Russian Foreign Ministry, in at least three provinces in the north of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan an unidentified aircraft was spotted dropping boxes for Daesh militants. Kabulov noted that the issue was raised by Russian diplomats at a UN Security Council meeting.

The parliament of Afghanistan echoed the envoy’s concerns. Some deputies even went so far as to suggest that the unidentified aircraft may be connected to the United States.What then did Kabulov mean by referring to Russia’s deployment of military force? Does it mean that Moscow is ready to bring in the military to Afghanistan in order to defeat Daesh?

According to an Afghan military analyst, retired Air Force General Atiqullah Amarkhel, the Russian official’s statement is more of a “warning” over the potential escalation of the situation in Afghanistan, than a promise to use military force.

“It is a political issue and [Kabulov’s] words are a diplomatic warning,” Amarkhel explained, stressing that it is highly unlikely that Russia will intervene to fight Daesh in Afghanistan.

“The Russian Federation will not take military measures until Daesh attacks the borders of six Central Asian states and Russia,” the general pointed out. “The reason for Russia’s concern over the growing influence of Daesh in Afghanistan, especially in the country’s north, is the threat of the deterioration of the situation in Central Asia.””Will Russia tolerate the presence of the Taliban and Daesh in Central Asia, which Russia considers to be in its sphere of interest? Unlikely. Moscow views the presence of any terrorist groups in Central Asia as a threat to its security,” Amarkhel remarked.

Thus, to tackle the problem the Russian Defense Ministry announced in June that it was going to reinforce its military bases in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan with modern weapons in order to prevent the import of terrorism from Afghanistan into Central Asia.

“We are alarmed by the growing presence in Afghanistan of Daesh militants whose number now exceeds 3,500. The terrorist group’s ongoing effort to establish an Islamic caliphate poses a serious threat to the security of Afghanistan and its neighbors,” Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said at a June meeting of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) in the Kazakh capital Astana.

The Russian defense minister emphasized that the Russian military bases in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are “guarantors of regional stability.””Together with our allies we are boosting their combat capability which, in turn, ensures the security of [their capitals] Dushanbe and Bishkek,” Shoigu stressed.

Citing political analysts, Amarkhel noted that Russia’s military involvement in Afghanistan would created new challenges for Moscow. He referred to the fact that Russia is currently engaged in an aerial operation in Syria aimed at protecting the legitimate government of Bashar al-Assad.

Moscow has repeatedly voiced its willingness to provide political and technical-military assistance to Kabul, at the same time denying the possibility of the involvement of the Russian Armed Forces in any military actions on the ground in Afghanistan.

Speaking to Sputnik, General Amarkhel called attention to the fact that although the government of Afghanistan and its allies are trying to defeat Daesh, the organization is only getting stronger.

With the Taliban controlling most of Afghanistan’s rural areas and Daesh consolidating its positions in the war-torn country the situation is steadily deteriorating.

“The war in Afghanistan is being expanded, in addition to the Taliban and Daesh, new terrorist groups have emerged [in the country]. Let’s see how the situation will unfold,” the general said.

“The relationship between Russia and the US is deteriorating day by day, so the US can use various groups of Islamists to increase pressure on the Russian Federation in order to worsen the situation in the Central Asian states, therefore, Russia is closely monitoring the situation,” Amarkhel assumed.

Related:

Afghan Army Launches Operation to Retake Village Controlled by Taliban, Daesh
Pentagon Claims ‘Zero Chance of Civilian Casualties’ in Deadly Afghan Strike
Daesh, Taliban Reportedly Joined Forces to Commit Afghan Village Massacre
Ex-President Karzai Opposes Alleged US Plan to Outsource Afghan War
Trump Says White House ‘Close’ to Making Decision on Afghan Strategy

Posted in Afghanistan, RussiaComments Off on What’s Behind Russia’s Warning of ‘Resorting to Military Force’ in Afghanistan?

US govt spends $76bn to arm & equip Afghan forces

 NOVANEWS

The Pentagon has spent $76 billion on weapons and equipment for the Afghan army and police since 2001, the US Government Accountability Office said. The report comes as President Donald Trump says he is “very close” to announcing a new strategy on Afghanistan.

The US has paid for 600,000 weapons, including rifles and pistols, for the Afghan army and police, the GAO report released on Thursday said. The funding also went to buy more than 25,000 grenade launchers and almost 10,000 rocket-propelled weapons to be used by the Afghans.

Additionally, the US has given to the government in Kabul 162,643 pieces of communications equipment and nearly 76,000 vehicles.

Earlier this summer, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) slammed the Pentagon for spending money on uniforms that Afghan forces didn’t need.

The US has spent $93.81 million over the past decade to provide Afghan troops with uniforms of a “forest” camouflage pattern which is largely unsuitable for Afghanistan’s landscape, a SIGAR report said.

Billions have been squandered on projects that were useless, or lost to waste and corruption, according to SIGAR.

The US’s profligate spending in Afghanistan is “the definition of insanity — doing the same things over and over again, expecting a different result,” Special Inspector General John F. Sopko told NBC News last year.

The US is overall estimated to have spent over $700 billion on military assistance, reconstruction and economic aid to Afghanistan in the past 17 years of war, which began in 2001 as a response to Afghanistan’s harboring of Al-Qaeda following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. With Al-Qaeda in the country largely defeated, the war has morphed into a fight with local Taliban insurgents.

On Thursday, President Trump told reporters that he’s “very close” to announcing his administration’s new strategy on Afghanistan.

“It’s a very big decision for me. I took over a mess and we’re going to make it a lot less messy,” he said.

US officials had earlier promised to deliver an updated strategy by mid-July, but the decision-making stalled.

The commander of US forces in Afghanistan, General John Nicholson, as well as Trump’s national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, suggested adding some 4,000 American troops to the nearly 9,000 already deployed in Afghanistan.

Trump reportedly lashed out at top US military officials in a July meeting for losing ground in Afghanistan and questioned whether America’s longest war is still worth fighting. “We are losing,” Trump said, according to an NBC report.

The president also reportedly considered firing the commander of US forces in Afghanistan.

In 2013 Trump tweeted: “We have wasted an enormous amount of blood and treasure in Afghanistan. Their government has zero appreciation. Let’s get out!”

The US-backed government in Kabul controls about 60 percent of the country – down from 65 percent the same time last year, according to the US military headquarters in Kabul.

Meanwhile, the Taliban is gaining ground. Last week, militants gained control of a key area in Afghanistan’s north Sari Pul province.

Earlier this summer, the Taliban raided and seized the district of Jani Khel in Paktia province, south of Kabul. The fall of Jani Khel marked its third victory in just four days.

Deaths of Afghan security forces in the early months of 2017 were “shockingly high,” SIGAR recently reported.

The Obama administration said a political solution that would involve the Taliban was necessary to end the conflict. The Trump administration has yet to outline its position.

Posted in USA, AfghanistanComments Off on US govt spends $76bn to arm & equip Afghan forces

McCain slams Trump over Afghanistan, unveils his strategy to win war

NOVANEWS
RT 

Senator John McCain has blasted President Donald Trump over a lack of strategy in America’s 17-year war in Afghanistan, and filed his own plan for the Senate to vote on. It involves more troops, more bombing and an enduring US presence in the country.

“Now, nearly seven months into President Trump’s administration, we’ve had no strategy at all as conditions on the ground have steadily worsened,” McCain, who is the chairman of the Senate’s Armed Services Committee, said in a statement Thursday. “The thousands of Americans putting their lives on the line in Afghanistan deserve better from their commander-in-chief.”

“We must face facts: We are losing in Afghanistan and time is of the essence if we intend to turn the tide,” he said.

McCain has filed his plan to win the war as a proposed amendment to the annual defense bill. The strategy calls for beefing up the number of US troops in Afghanistan, “significantly” increasing the use of US air power there, as well as getting rid of current withdrawal timelines placed on the military, according to a released copy of the legislation.

The Republican senator’s proposed amendment does not specify the number of additional troops to be sent to fight the war which has gone on for 17 years – longer than any other war the US has been involved in.

President Trump himself reportedly lashed out at top US military officials in a July meeting for losing ground in Afghanistan. “We are losing,” he said, according to an NBC report.

The president reportedly considered firing the commander of American troops in Afghanistan, General John Nicholson.

Nicholson had earlier said that a few thousand more troops were needed to gain an advantage over the resurgent Taliban. The Trump administration was weighing the deployment of 3,000-4,000 additional forces, according to lawmakers briefed on the plans.

When testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee in June, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis said the administration would be prepared to brief lawmakers on a new Afghanistan strategy in mid-July. However, the new strategy has yet to come.

The US-backed government in Kabul controls about 60 percent of the country, while the Taliban are gaining ground.
Last week, the militants gained control of a key area in Afghanistan’s north Sari Pul province.

“We requested reinforcement from the central government, unfortunately couldn’t get any support, that is why the forces lost control of Mirzawalang,” Zabi Amani, a spokesman for the provincial governor, told AP.

Earlier this summer, the Taliban raided and seized the district of Jani Khel in Paktia province, south of Kabul. The fall of Jani Khel marked their third victory in just four days.

The Taliban also overran the Kohistan district in the northern Faryab province after storming its government’s headquarters, forcing local security forces to retreat to another base. Just hours after the capture of Kohistan, they seized the Taywara district in western Ghor province.

The US is estimated to have spent over $700 billion on military assistance, reconstruction and economic aid to Afghanistan in the past 17 years. … Full article

Posted in USA, AfghanistanComments Off on McCain slams Trump over Afghanistan, unveils his strategy to win war

Pentagon Enjoys Impunity in Spite of the Rapidly Mounting Civilian Death Toll

NOVANEWS
By Grete Mautner 

Somehow most of us grew accustomed to various media sources reporting horrific crimes against civilians committed by US servicemen in various regions of the world on the daily basis.

For instance, yet another air raid launched by US Air Force on July 25 in Afghanistan claimed a number of civilian lives. Eight people fell dead, including women and children. For local residents the fact that the area where the attack occurred is being contested by pro-government forces and various militant groups is yesterday’s news. However, as eyewitnesses argue, this time the strikes were aimed against civilians. There’s been reports that those who were trying to provide first aid to the victims of the air strike were outraged by the number of wounded minors. It’s curious that the contested Nangarhar province is located on the very border with Pakistan, so there are no large cities where hitting one’s designated target may be tricky. Americans have been bombing the area for a long time.

Under the conditions of self-declared military intervention, local authorities are forced to bear with the fact that the death of a single terrorist killed by US and NATO soldiers would be accompanied by a number of civilian lives lost in the process. However, the best the Pentagon has ever done for the relatives of its victims was the offering of pathetic condolences accompanied by a promise to “investigate the incident”. Just a few days ago US aircraft would “mistakenly” bomb an Afghan military base in the province of Helmand, claiming the lives of 17 Afghan policemen.

American air raids usually result in destroyed Afghanistan schools, as it was on July 15, when yet another school was attacked from the sky in the town of Kunduz, and destroyed hospitals, like the one run by Doctors Without Borders that was destroyed by a coalition air strike last October. Back then a total 24 people was murdered, including 12 medical practitioners and three children. Even wedding ceremonies that can be pretty massive in Afghanistan are not immune to such US and NATO attacks, as it happened in November in the southern Afghan province of Kandahar, when a single US air strike would claim a total of 95 civilians lives, while leaving another 50 people injured.

In the first half of 2017 alone a total of 5243 civilians suffered injuries during various skirmishes, with 1,662 of them suffering lethal injuries and 3,581 suffering non-lethal injured, says a report of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA). Women and children are still suffering the most from the conflict. According to the above mentioned report, in the first 6 months of 2017, 174 women were killed and 462 injured. UNAMA chief Tadamichi Yamamoto has recently noted that Afghans continue to die, get injured, and be forced to abandon their homes to escape violence.

In Syria and Iraq, the death toll is even higher. The UN and human rights organizations are outraged, since they have long been accusing Washington of neglecting international law and the basic safety of the people they claim to be protecting. But nobody seems to listen.

For instance, the campaign that the West launched to pursue the liberation of Iraq turned out to be no less brutal than the war that was raging in the country. In spite of all sorts of statements that Washington would make about the so-called high precision strikes it would allegedly carry out in Mosul, a number of American media sources would publish satellite images of the city virtually reduced to ruins. According to the Independent, more than 40,000 civilians were killed in the devastating battle to retake Mosul from ISIS – a death toll far higher than was previously estimated.

It is necessary to conduct an independent investigation of the crimes committed against civilians of Iraqi Mosul. This statement was made by the international human rights organization known as Amnesty International. According to the human rights defenders, the US-led coalition conducted a “series of merciless and illegal attacks” in Mosul. In particular, it is asserted that the coalition has been using highly explosive and inaccurate ordinance. As it’s been stressed by the Amnesty International, the battle for Mosul led to a true humanitarian disaster.

But the strikes carry on, as it’s been reported the recent strike carried out by the US-led coalition last week against a prison in Syria’s Rakka, where ISIS would hold its hostages, resulted in a total of 30 people killed.

Syria’s civilian population is dying in hundreds at the hands of US servicemen that have no legal justification to even be present in Syria. The mounting death toll has been carefully tracked by the Airwars portal.

To mislead the international community and hide the true extent of the crimes that are being committed by US servicemen in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, thus preventing an international investigation from giving a careful evaluation of the bloody role that Washington played in the destruction of the Middle East, Washington has been routinely accusing Damascus of chemical weapons usage.

Just last June, the White House would announce that US intelligence sources were in possession of reports about the alleged preparations carried out by Syrian authorities to launch a chemical attack. These reports were followed by unfounded accusations against Damascus voiced by the opposition forces.

However, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Joseph Dunford has been forced to publicly acknowledge that the Pentagon has no grounds to suspect the Syrian government of any instances of chemical weapons use.

However, the international community has every ground to accuse the United States of committing war crimes in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, where hundreds of civilians continue to perish due to indiscriminate American air raids, yet, no one has been brought to justice so far.

Posted in USA, AfghanistanComments Off on Pentagon Enjoys Impunity in Spite of the Rapidly Mounting Civilian Death Toll

Who is Behind Afghanistan’s Blame Game against Pakistan?

NOVANEWS

Senator’s McCain and Graham in South Waziristan, Pakistan

     By Sajjad Shaukat for Veterans Today

Terrorist outfits such as the Islamic State group (Also known as Daesh, ISIS, ISIL) and its affiliated militant groups which are being backed by American CIA and Israeli Mossad arranged several acts of terrorism in the Middle East, especially Syria. ISIS through its linked militant groups has, also, been conducted acts of sabotage in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

When any terror attack occurs in Afghanistan, Afghan government revives old blame game against Pakistan.

On May 31, this year, a massive truck bombing of the Afghan capital’s diplomatic section killed more than 150 people and injured hundreds of others, including foreigners. It was the deadliest terror attack in the 16-year-old conflict.

Taliban denied responsibility for the terror attack. But, Afghanistan’s intelligence service accused the Haqqani network by saying that a Taliban-affiliated group in Pakistan, carried out the attack. Addressing the conference-the “Kabul Process on Peace and Security Cooperation”, held in Kabul on June 6, 2017, which was attended by representatives from 26 countries and international organizations,Afghan President Ashraf Ghani criticized Pakistan for a lack of cooperation in promoting Afghan peace and alleged that Taliban insurgents are using sanctuaries on Pakistani soil to wage the insurgency in Afghanistan.

In the same speech, President Ghani offered peace talks to the Afghan Taliban by reiterating his preconditions such as recognition of the Afghan constitution, continuity of the reforms of educating and advancing the rights of women, and renunciation of violence and linkages with terrorist groups.

A Taliban spokesman rejected Ghani’s offer of a peace dialogue by stating that it is another attempt to endorse and to prolong foreign occupation of Afghanistan.

However, during the same conference, a powerful bomb went off at a main mosque in the western city of Herat, killing at least 10 people. Again, Taliban spokesman denied its involvement in connection with the explosion.

On the other side, Pakistan’s special Corps Commander Conference took the stern notice of Afghanistan’s allegations and threats and vowed to defend the country with full forces.

According to the press release of the Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), issued on June 6, 2017, the “Special Corps Commanders Conference presided over by Chief of the Army Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa called for Afghanistan to introspect and not allege Pakistan of sponsoring terrorism…the conference reviewed the security situation…Strongly condemning the Kabul blast…meeting has expressed complete solidarity with Afghan government…instead of blaming Pakistan, Afghanistan needs to look forward and identify the real issues…Armed forces will defend the country from each challenge and will continue work to establish peace in the region.”

ISPR statement further reported that the meeting reaffirming continued support to regional peace and stability, the forum reiterated military’s resolve to defend the motherland against all types of threat.

Nevertheless, we need to know that who is behind Afghanistan’s blame game against Pakistan and why the same continues unabated in wake of terrorism-related assaults in Pakistan.

It mentionable that the armed forces of Pakistan have successfully broken the backbone of the foreign-backed terrorists by the successful military operations Zarb-e-Azb and Radd-ul-Fasaad which have also been extended to other parts of the country, including Balochistan. And Pakistan’s primarily intelligence agency, ISI has broken the network of these terrorist groups by capturing several militants, while thwarting a number of terror attempts.

Besides, since the government of the Balochistan province announced general pardon and protection to the Baloch militants as part of reconciliation process, many insurgents and their leaders have surrendered their arms and decided to work for the development of Pakistan and peace has been restored in Balochistan.

Peace has also been restored in Karachi and other provinces of Pakistan, including the tribal areas. But, recent blasts in Balochistan and other regions of the country show that the US-led India, Afghanistan and Israel have again started acts of sabotage to destabilize Pakistan and to damage the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC)

In this regard, as part of the latest wave of terrorism, at least 35 people, including nine police men were killed and several others injured in a suicide blast near Arfa Tower on Ferozpur Road in Lahore on July 24, 2017.

On the same day, ISPR statement said that Pakistan’s Chief of Army Staff Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa raised concerns with the visiting Commander Resolute Support Mission (RSM) and US Forces in Afghanistan, General John W. Nicholson, over “the blame game perpetrated by some quarters in Afghanistan and United States to undermine Pakistan’s contribution to the war on terror.

The army chief elaborated, “This theme is being played at a time when policy review is being undertaken in USA…despite provocations, Pakistan will continue to act positively as we consider defeat of terrorism as national interest.”

The ISPR statement further pointed out that Nicholson reiterated his appreciation of Pakistan Army’s professionalism and admiration for resilience of the people. Both agreed on need for continuous engagement and coordination for peace and stability in the region.

Notably, a visiting United States (US) Congressional delegation led by Senator John McCain was taken on a tour of South Waziristan by Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa on July 3, this year.

During their visit to South Waziristan, the delegation was briefed on recent measures taken for the improvement of the fencing of the Pak-Afghan border and enhanced surveillance.

Speaking at the event, Senator McCain stressed the importance of continued cooperation between Pakistan and Afghanistan. Senator Graham expressed his satisfaction with the progress against the fight against terrorism by stating, “I cannot stress how impressed I am with what’s happened in the last two years. It speaks well of the Pakistani Army and the people in this region”. Senator Whitehouse also lauded the military’s efforts in curbing terrorism.

As a matter of fact, the US and India do not want to see peace and prosperity in the region. Sadly, Pakistan’s dominant role in Afghanistan’s peace process under the Quadrilateral Coordination Group (QCG) has, deliberately, been sabotaged by killing of the Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansur in CIA-operated drone attack in Balochistan. After the incident, Afghan Taliban leaders refused to participate in the US-sponsored talks with the Afghan government. While, in the recent past, with the help of Pakistan, a series of meetings were held in Islamabad and Kabul among the representatives of Pakistan, Afghanistan, China and the US to develop an understanding for the earliest possible resumption of stalled talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban with view to ending nearly 15 years of bloodshed in Afghanistan.

Owing to America’s double game, trust deficit deepened between Islamabad and Washington. Therefore, on June 10, 2016, a high-level delegation of the US visited Islamabad and met the Pakistan’s former Chief of the Army Staff Gen. Raheel Sharif and Adviser to the former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Foreign Affairs Sartaj Aziz separately.

During the meeting, expressing his serious concern on the US drone strike in Balochistan as a violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty, Pakistan’s former Army Chief Gen. Raheel Sharif highlighted as to how it had impacted the mutual trust and was counterproductive in consolidating the gains of Operation Zarb-i-Azb against terrorists. He explained, “All stakeholders need to understand Pakistan’s challenges-inter-tribal linkages and decades—old presence of over three million refugees—blaming Pakistan for instability in Afghanistan is unfortunate”.

US ambivalent policy about Islamabad could also be judged from some other development. In this respect, another delegation of US Senators including Senator Lindsey Graham led by Senator John McCain, Chairman of US Senate Arms Services committee visited Islamabad and North Waziristan Agency (NWA) on July 3, 2016. The US Senators visited areas cleared of terrorists during Operation Zarb-e-Azb. American delegation appreciated the Pakistan Army’s accomplishment of cleansing the entire area of NWA right up to the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, after witnessing the terrorists’ hideouts and communication infrastructure dismantled by the Pakistan Army.

Outwardly, American top officials have been appreciating the capabilities of Pakistan’s security agencies against terrorism, but inwardly, they are not pleased in relation to the successes, achieved by the armed forces of Pakistan against the militants, because America is acting upon a dual strategy in relation to Islamabad—also due to the reason that Pakistan in the only nuclear country in the Islamic World, which irritates America and its allies-India and Israeli.

In this context, in the recent past, new wave of terrorism in Pakistan killed several innocent people, while various terrorist outfits, especially the ISIS, and the affiliated faction of the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan Jamaat-ur-Ahrar (TTP-JA also known as JuA) claimed responsibility for these brutal acts. TTP based in Afghanistan has its connections with ISIL and other terrorist organizations and affiliated terror groups, including Baloch separatist elements, and all these outfits are promoting the anti-Pakistan agenda of the foreign entities against Pakistan. As part of the double game, American CIA, Indian RAW, Israeli Mossad and Afghan intelligence agency, National Directorate of Security (NDS) which are in collaboration, are using these terror outfits in destabilizing Pakistan and particularly Balochistan, including Afghanistan through various acts of terrorism in order to fulfill the covert strategic aims of the US-led India and Israel against Pakistan, China, Russia and Iran.

These external secret agencies are particularly supporting the TTP which is hiding in Nuristan and Kunar provinces of Afghanistan. Reportedly, Mullah Fazlullah led TTP is behind several terror activities inside Pakistan, as the latter has also become center of the Great Game due to the ideal location of Balochistan. With the tactical assistance of CIA, particularly, Indian RAW is trying todamage Pak-China CPEC project.

While, India, the US and puppet rulers of Afghanistan have always blamed Islamabad for cross-border terrorism in Afghanistan to divert attention from the acts of sabotage, which they have been arranging in Pakistan. Main purpose behind is also to pacify their public, as the US-led countries have failed in their fight against the Taliban who are waging a war of liberation against the occupying forces.

As regards the terrorism-related incidents inside Afghanistan, India, Israel and the Afghan government want to prolong the stay of the US-led NATO forces in that country and are using the militant outfits to create further unrest there, while shifting the blame game towards Islamabad.

In this regard, suicide bombers attacked a Shiite mosque in the western Afghan city of Herat on August 1, this year killing at least 20 people. The Taliban denied that they were behind the attack, while the ISIS group took the responsibility. While the majority-Sunni country has been relatively free of sectarian violence, the ISIS terrorists have repeatedly targeted gatherings of Shiites, so that sectarian riots could be erupted in the war-ravaged country.

ISIS on July 31, 2017 claimed responsibility for an attack on the Iraqi Embassy in Kabul, which began with a suicide bomber blowing him up at the main gate, allowing gunmen to enter the building and battle security forces. Similarly, a car suicide bomb exploded in western Kabul July 24, 2017, killing at least 27 people. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack.

Besides various terror assaults, on January 10, 2017, an explosion took place in Governor House Kandhar (Afghanistan) where diplomats of United Arab Emirates (UAE) were also present along with the Governor, Deputy Governor, Inspector General of Police (IGP) and other dignities. The blast killed 12 people—five UAE diplomats and injured 18 persons, including Governor of Kandhar and UAE Ambassador to Afghanistan. IGP Abdul Razziq went outside the hall few minutes before the blast. IGP Razziq put blame on Pakistan’s Haqqani network and its primary intelligence agency, ISI on the very next day. The matter was investigated by two committees, consisting of NDS and Afghan government and UAE, including Scotland Yard. IGP Razziq did not cooperate with the investigation teams, even though he was responsible for the security of Governor House.

It is mentionable that the US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told Congress on July 13, 2017 that the United States “is not winning the war against Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan”, promising to brief lawmakers on “a new war strategy to call for thousands more U.S. troops.” Now, American President Donald Trump has decided to dispatch more troops in Afghanistan.

According to data released by the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, “The Afghan government was assessed by the US military to control or influence just 59.7 percent of Afghanistan’s 407 districts as of Feb. 20, a nearly 11 percentage-point decrease from the same time in 2016.”

In fact, Taliban who are fighting against the US-led NATO countries for the liberation of their country are targeting their installations and military personnel. In this connection, two US soldiers of NATO were killed and six others were wounded when a suicide bomber attacked their patrol on August 3, 2017 in eastern Afghanistan, marking the second incident in just as many days when insurgent attacks have killed Western troops. But, in order to divert attention of their public from NATO’s defeatism in Afghanistan and the prolonged war of the 16 years, some of these countries shift the blame game towards Pakistan and Russia.

In this respect, at a news conference in Kabul, on April 24, 2017, the US Defense Secretary James Mattis and Gen. John Nicholson, the American commander in Afghanistan supposedly stated that Russia was providing weapons to the Taliban. But, Moscow denied these false allegations.

Especially, the US is behind Afghanistan’s blame game against Pakistan in relation to terrorism.

Posted in Afghanistan, Pakistan & KashmirComments Off on Who is Behind Afghanistan’s Blame Game against Pakistan?

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