Archive | Yemen

UN – ‘Saudis causing immense carnage in Yemen’

NOVANEWS
Ban ki-Moon really takes a whack at the Saudis for Yemen funeral bombing

Ban ki-Moon really takes a whack at the Saudis for Yemen funeral bombing

 

This was Yemen's 9-11

This was Yemen’s 9-11

[ Editor’s Note: The chances of this Yemen funeral strike being a mistake are virtually zero. The US (like the others involved) has been using the war to test out all of its first line equipment like surveillance and communication intercepts to learn its effective limits and fix imperfections for when needed with an adversary that can really fight back.

Also, top officials of the countries actively involved with Saudi Arabia in the fighting would have to been aware of this planned attack to sign off on the bad PR risks anticipated with a huge number of civilian casualties.

The only rationale I can see for them doing this is that they actually fear Yemen becoming a desert version of Vietnam — that is, making all the Western high tech military power that has been unleashed on poor Yemen, including the mini-nukes, look bad.

So it was worth the PR blowback risk to try to kill as much of the rebel top officials, as they have been the key, along with the fighting spirit of the Yemeni people, to standing up to the onslaught. They certainly had no big fear from corporate media, and really none from the UN.

It was nice to hear Ban ki-Moon’s strong stance, but he is on his way out as General Secretary, and the new guy coming in is not about take on something like this, accusing Security Council members of war crimes. If the aiders and abettors of Saudi Arabia effectively get a free pass on the funeral procession massacre, what could possibly ever make then think twice about doing it again somewhere else?… JD ]

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This was a clear a war crime as we have seen. If they can do this, they can get away with anything

This was a clear a war crime as we have seen. If they can do this, they can get away with anything

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon has condemned Saturday’s Saudi carnage in Yemen as a heartless attack which violated international humanitarian law. The UN chief said a man-made catastrophe is unfolding in Yemen.

Ban also said there must be accountability for what he called the appalling conduct of the entire war. Meanwhile, the UN human rights chief has expressed outrage over the Saudi airstrikes on the Yemeni funeral, which killed more than 140 people. The UN rights chief also urged accountability so that violations do not go unpunished in Yemen.

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New Documents Show US Knew Helping Saudis in Yemen Could Be War Crime

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As the relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia comes under renewed scrutiny in the wake of the Gulf nation’s weekend bombing campaign in Yemen, a Reuters exclusive published Monday reveals that the Obama administration approved a $1.3 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia last year despite warnings that it could implicate the U.S. in war crimes.

The Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen on Saturday killed at least 140 people and wounded hundreds more, prompting the U.S. to launch a “review” of its support for the kingdom. On Monday, Reuters reported that the U.S. Department of State had already warned the government that “the United States could be implicated in war crimes” for aiding the campaign.

Officials also had doubts that the Saudi military would actually be able to target Houthi militants without hurting civilians or destroying infrastructure, according to department emails and interviews with officials.

However, government lawyers stopped just short of concluding that U.S. support for the campaign would implicate the country in war crimes—which could have opened up the U.S. military to accountability. Reuters writes:

U.S. government lawyers ultimately did not reach a conclusion on whether U.S. support for the campaign would make the United States a “co-belligerent” in the war under international law, four current and former officials said. That finding would have obligated Washington to investigate allegations of war crimes in Yemen and would have raised a legal risk that U.S. military personnel could be subject to prosecution, at least in theory.

The documents, obtained by Reuters through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, shed new light on “how the United States pressed the Saudis to limit civilian damage and provided detailed lists of sites to avoid bombing, even as officials worried about whether the Saudi military had the capacity to do so,” Rueters continues.

American officials were actually well aware that airstrikes in Yemen were killing scores of civilians. Reuters writes:

State Department lawyers “had their hair on fire” as reports of civilian casualties in Yemen multiplied in 2015, and prominent human rights groups charged that Washington could be complicit in war crimes, one U.S. official said. That official and the others requested anonymity.

During an October 2015 meeting with private human rights groups, a State Department specialist on protecting civilians in conflict acknowledged Saudi strikes were going awry.

“The strikes are not intentionally indiscriminate but rather result from a lack of Saudi experience with dropping munitions and firing missiles,” the specialist said, according to a department account of the meeting.

The specialist also noted that “weak intelligence” had contributed to confusion over who was who on the ground.

The investigation comes just after the U.S. approved yet another billion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia. At the time of the authorization in September, Oxfam America president Ray Offenheiser condemned the deal as continued evidence of both nations’ “startling indifference to civilian lives.”

Indeed, as Common Dreams reported over the weekend, the Obama administration’s new review has little credibility among anti-war advocates. Although National Security Council spokesman Ned Price rebuked the airstrikes Saturday night, stating, “U.S. security cooperation with Saudi Arabia is not a blank check,” United Nations-based journalist Samuel Oakford pointed out in response that the government has long been making that empty declaration.

“WH used this ‘not a black check’ language for months,” he tweeted, noting that there is also no deadline for the review and that “refueling continues.”

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Yemen: Imperialist Engineered Disaster. US Navy Destroyer Says It Was Fired on by Resistance Forces in Yemen

NOVANEWS
Yemen-map

Various news agencies internationally reported on October 10 that a Pentagon war vessel was threatened by missiles amid an escalating war of imperialist dominance in the Middle Eastern state of Yemen. This ship was reported to have been deployed in the southern Red Sea.

Only a week before another ship from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was struck causing extensive damage in a missile attack said to have also come from inland Yemen.

A Destroyer known as the USS Mason was reportedly not struck in the alleged attack according to Navy Capt. Jeff Davis, who serves as a spokesman for the Department of Defense. Pentagon officials contend the incident took place around 7 p.m. as the ship, which originated from Norfolk, Virginia, was claimed to have been in international waters off the coast of Yemen.

The Pentagon quickly sought to blame the supposed incursion against their ship on the Ansurallah movement (also known as the Houthis) which Washington has targeted as the principal enemy in Yemen since the religious group has made gains in taking control of huge areas of territory in the northern, central and southern regions of the country located near the Gulf of Aden. The Supreme Revolutionary Committee, an alliance led by the Ansurallah, has been targeted in air strikes and ground operations since the withdrawal of U.S. diplomatic and military personnel in early 2015.

Davis told the Washington Post that the U.S. assessed “the missiles were launched from Houthi-controlled territory in Yemen. The United States remains committed to ensuring freedom of navigation everywhere in the world, and we will continue to take all necessary steps to ensure the safety of our ships and our service members.”

The war conducted by Saudi Arabia and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) since March 2015, has resulted in the deaths of more than 10,000 Yemenis. Daily aerial bombardments have sought to neutralize and defeat the Ansurallah movement which is accused of being supported politically by the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Supporters of the Ansurallah have been largely the Shite-oriented adherents of Islam in Yemen whom have formed an alliance with the former President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Military units still loyal to Saleh have fought against a coalition of anti-Houthis forces including the ousted Saudi and U.S.-backed President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, who has been reinforced by Islamist elements alongside special forces from the GCC countries and their allies.

On October 8, Saudi-GCC air forces struck a funeral in the capital of Sanaa killing over 140 people. There were at least two separate bombings according to eyewitnesses at the scene of the attacks. These air strikes follow a pattern since this phase of the war emerged which targets civilians through the bombing of residential areas, schools, health facilities, mosques and internally displaced persons camps.

There has been the deliberate destruction of power stations and water supply lines in a war of desperation to reclaim control of the country by political interests currently allied with Washington, London, Paris, Brussels and Riyadh. Numerous attempts to negotiate a political settlement involving the major organizations and religious groups inside the Middle East’s most impoverished state have been sabotaged by the Saudi Monarchy supported by the U.S. State Department.

International Outcry Over Funeral Attack

Even the Wall Street Journal reported on October 10 that “With its military campaign in Yemen under renewed international scrutiny, Saudi Arabia said it ‘regretted’ a strike on a funeral that killed 142 mourners but stopped short of accepting responsibility for the attack. In a letter from its United Nations mission to the U.N. Security Council on Sunday, the kingdom promised to release the results of an investigation into Saturday’s airstrike, which Yemen’s Iranian-backed Houthi rebels blamed on the Saudi-led coalition fighting to unseat them.”

U.S. State Department top envoy Secretary of State John Kerry was said to have made a telephone call to the Saudi leadership expressing Washington’s “grave concern.” Perhaps this particular air strike which received widespread press coverage in U.S. media was a potential political embarrassment to the administration of President Barack Obama. Kerry’s predecessor, Hillary Clinton, is currently seeking the presidency in a hotly-contested race against New York real estate magnate and right-wing demagogue Donald Trump.

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon also weighed in on the massacre saying “Aerial attacks by the Saudi-led coalition have already caused immense carnage and destroyed much of the country’s medical facilities and other vital civilian infrastructure. Bombing people already mourning the loss of loved ones is reprehensible. This latest horrific incident demands a full inquiry. More broadly, there must be accountability for the appalling conduct of this entire war.”

This same statement went on to emphasize that “The Secretary-General condemns the attack on an event hall in Sana’a where hundreds of people were gathered for a funeral ceremony. Initial reports indicate that the attack, said to have been airstrikes by the Coalition, killed over 140 people and injured hundreds of others. The Secretary-General expresses his sincere condolences and sympathies to the families of the victims and wishes a speedy recovery to those injured. The Secretary-General notes that any deliberate attack against civilians is utterly unacceptable and calls for a prompt and impartial investigation of this incident. Those responsible for the attack must be brought to justice. The Secretary-General once again reminds all parties to abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law – including the fundamental rules of proportionality, distinction and precaution – to protect civilians and civilian infrastructure against attack.”

The Secretary General also noted that he had requested that the UN Human Rights Council establish a team to conduct an independent investigation into the bombings on October 8. He stated as well that these latest attacks represented a continuation of a disaster that has left 80 percent of the 20 million people in Yemen in need of humanitarian assistance.

An Imperialist-engineered Disaster

Many Yemenis have fled to other parts of the country and abroad to avoid the impact of the conflict. The situation has been the subject of numerous reports issued by the UN Office for Humanitarian Affairs and other relief organizations.

Spokesman for the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Jens Laerke, went as far as to say that the bombing and ground war in Yemen has destroyed the economic fabric of the country. Laerke emphasized that the situation has destroyed basic services moving the economy toward near total collapse. This same office noted that children have been the main casualties in the war. (VOA)

The World Food Program (WFP), a UN agency, reported that it has reduced monthly food rations to the people of Yemen due to the lack of funds. Bettina Luescher, a spokeswoman for the WFP, said that agency needs another $145 million to complete its work by the end of 2016. (VOA)

Laerke stressed as well that “Even before the violence and the war in Yemen, the malnutrition rates of children in Yemen were the highest in the world. So you have a little bit of a perfect storm coming together there.”

The port city of Hudaydah has suffered tremendous damage making it difficult to import food and other needed supplies. “Before the war, Yemen was over 90 percent dependent on import of basic food items and medicines,” he said. “Eighty percent of those imports come through Hudaydah port. That gives you an indication of the importance of that lifeline.”

“What is particularly urgent in the port is the rehabilitation and the repair of five cranes, which were damaged in an airstrike in August 2015, so they have been partly out of commission for quite some time,” Laerke noted.

“Half of the children are stunted,” Luescher added, “meaning they are too short for their age because of chronic malnutrition. This year, the nutrition cluster estimates that there are 1.5 million [children younger than 5] who are acutely malnourished, of whom 375,000 are suffering from severe acute malnutrition. There are many, many others suffering from moderate malnutrition, indicative of the gravity and severity of the situation.”

U.S. War Policy Causes Death and Destruction

This is a genocidal war being waged with the support of Washington. It is the Obama administration that has authorized the use of American-made warplanes, bombs and other destructive weapons against the Yemeni people.

The Wall Street Journal reported on October 10 that “The U.S., a top Saudi arms supplier, approved a $1.15 billion sale of tanks and other military equipment to Riyadh in August. Citing Yemen’s high civilian casualty toll, four senators introduced a resolution on the floor of the Senate in September to block the sale, but the measure failed to garner sufficient support in a vote later that month. The U.K. government has approved for the sale of billions of dollars’ worth of British jets, bombs and missiles to the country in recent years.”

Without the diplomatic cover provided by the White House the war waged by the Saudi-GCC coalition could not have been carried out for the last 19 months. The situation in Syria has overshadowed the war in Yemen yet both are a direct result of the failed imperialist policies of the U.S.

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Do Western Nations Care about Yemeni Lives or Saudi Blood Money?

NOVANEWS

by: Medea Benjamin

Mourners on Monday carry the coffin of Abdul Qader Helal, the mayor of the Yemeni capital San’aa, who was killed in an air strike on a funeral blamed by Houthi rebels on Saudi Arabia. (Photo: Reuters)

How much is the life of a Yemeni worth? Not much, according to the Saudi regime that has been bombing and starving the people of Yemen for since March 2015, or to the Saudi’s western backers, particularly the US and UK, which have been supplying the Saudi regime with weapons, military training, logistical support and diplomatic cover for its dirty interventionist war.

The latest outrage is the October 8 bombing of a packed funeral hall in Yemen’s capital city of Sanaa. This horrendous attack killed more than 140 people and injured about 600 more.

“The time for review and mild statements of condemnation is over. The blood of the Yemeni people is on our hands.”

On the heels of this attack comes a blistering report by Reuters showing, through Freedom of Information Act documents, that the Obama administration went ahead with a $1.3 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia last year despite warnings from US officials that the United States could be implicated in war crimes for supporting a Saudi-led air campaign in Yemen that has killed thousands of civilians.

What has been the US and UK governments’ response to the funeral bombing? The British government announced UK arms sales to the Saudis is “under careful and continual review”, while the Obama administration issued a statement that US support for Saudis is not a “blank check” and that the US was “prepared to adjust our support so as to better align with US principles, values and interests.”

The “principles, values and interests” of the Western powers, however, have been to buy cheap Saudi oil and make record profits by selling massive quantities of weapons to one of the most repressive countries in the world.

Ever since the founding of the kingdom in 1932, the West has allied itself with a government that beheads non-violent dissidents, forces women to live under the dictates of male guardians, treats foreign workers like indentured servants, spreads the intolerant Wahhabi version of Islam around the world, funds terrorist groups, crushes democratic uprisings in neighboring countries like Bahrain and now wages a catastrophic war in one of the poorest countries in the Arab world, Yemen.

Yemenis are furious about the latest Saudi massacre, as well as Western complicity and the lack of action on the part of the international community. Thousands marched on the UN headquarters demanding a UN investigation. Others are amassing at the Saudi border, calling for revenge and perhaps sparking an even wider conflict.

In the US, Senator Chris Murphy from Connecticut is one of the few representatives expressing outrage. He said the Saudi attack on funeral party follows months of attacks on schools, homes, and hospitals. “If the U.S. is serious when it says our support for Saudi Arabia isn’t a blank check, then it’s time to prove it—because it’s clear the Saudi-led coalition isn’t listening. The administration should pull U.S. support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen because it’s harming America’s national security, enabling terrorist groups to thrive, and killing innocent civilians.”

What can we do? Join us in demanding that our government stop arming the Saudi regime.  Support the courageous human rights defenders inside Saudi Arabia who are trying to reform their government through nonviolent means, such as Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association, also known as ACPRA, whose eleven members—all prominent human rights defenders—are suffering lengthy prison sentences. Call on the United Nations to form an independent international commission to investigate war crimes in Yemen.

The time for review and mild statements of condemnation is over. The blood of the Yemeni people is on our hands. If the Western nations want to show that they value the lives of Yemenis over the profits of their weapons industries, they must immediately stop providing the bombs, the bombers, the armored tanks, the Apache helicopters, the missiles, the howitzers, the training, the refueling, and all other military support to the Saudi criminals.  If Western values do not prioritize making blood money for General Dynamics, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and the other companies that profit from war, let’s prove it.

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New Documents Show US Knew Helping Saudis in Yemen Could Be War Crime

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Officials doubted Saudi military could target Houthi militants without hurting civilians or destroying infrastructure, Reuters reports

A Saudi military member stands next to a destroyed building in Aden, Yemen. (Photo: Ahmed Farwan/flickr/cc)

As the relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia comes under renewed scrutiny in the wake of the Gulf nation’s weekend bombing campaign in Yemen, a Reutersexclusive published Monday reveals that the Obama administration approved a $1.3 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia last year despite warnings that it could implicate the U.S. in war crimes.

The Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen on Saturday killed at least 140 people and wounded hundreds more, prompting the U.S. to launch a “review” of its support for the kingdom. On Monday, Reuters reported that the U.S. Department of State had already warned the government that “the United States could be implicated in war crimes” for aiding the campaign.

Officials also had doubts that the Saudi military would actually be able to target Houthi militants without hurting civilians or destroying infrastructure, according to department emails and interviews with officials.

However, government lawyers stopped just short of concluding that U.S. support for the campaign would implicate the country in war crimes—which could have opened up the U.S. military to accountability. Reuters writes:

U.S. government lawyers ultimately did not reach a conclusion on whether U.S. support for the campaign would make the United States a “co-belligerent” in the war under international law, four current and former officials said. That finding would have obligated Washington to investigate allegations of war crimes in Yemen and would have raised a legal risk that U.S. military personnel could be subject to prosecution, at least in theory.

The documents, obtained by Reuters through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, shed new light on “how the United States pressed the Saudis to limit civilian damage and provided detailed lists of sites to avoid bombing, even as officials worried about whether the Saudi military had the capacity to do so,” Rueters continues.

American officials were actually well aware that airstrikes in Yemen were killing scores of civilians. Reuters writes:

State Department lawyers “had their hair on fire” as reports of civilian casualties in Yemen multiplied in 2015, and prominent human rights groups charged that Washington could be complicit in war crimes, one U.S. official said. That official and the others requested anonymity.

During an October 2015 meeting with private human rights groups, a State Department specialist on protecting civilians in conflict acknowledged Saudi strikes were going awry.

“The strikes are not intentionally indiscriminate but rather result from a lack of Saudi experience with dropping munitions and firing missiles,” the specialist said, according to a department account of the meeting.

The specialist also noted that “weak intelligence” had contributed to confusion over who was who on the ground.

The investigation comes just after the U.S. approved yet another billion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia. At the time of the authorization in September, Oxfam America president Ray Offenheiser condemned the deal as continued evidence of both nations’ “startling indifference to civilian lives.”

Indeed, as Common Dreams reported over the weekend, the Obama administration’s new review has little credibility among anti-war advocates. Although National Security Council spokesman Ned Price rebuked the airstrikes Saturday night, stating, “U.S. security cooperation with Saudi Arabia is not a blank check,” United Nations-based journalist Samuel Oakford pointed out in response that the government has long been making that empty declaration.

“WH used this ‘not a black check’ language for months,” he tweeted, noting that there is also no deadline for the review and that “refueling continues.”

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Zio-Wahhabi regime: Investigations into War Crimes in Yemen “Prohibited”

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Image result for SAUDI WAR IN YEMEN CARTOON

Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime rejected a request by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Bin Al-Hussein to form an international commission of inquiry into war crimes committed in Yemen.

“Riyadh does not support the call of the High Commissioner to form an international investigation committee,”  Zio-Wahhabi Minister of Culture and Information of Adel Tarifi said in a statement, stressing that “the work of the Yemeni National Commission of Inquiry is generally agreed”, according to reports by German Press Agency.

The Human Rights Council of the United Nations had refused on Thursday to open an independent investigation into war crimes in Yemen, and demanded instead a national commission of inquiry to investigate attacks on hospitals and killing of civilians.

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The American-Made Catastrophe in Yemen

NOVANEWS

While US officials condemn Russian war crimes in Syria, the US-Saudi coalition in Yemen is committing the same – but the media is silent

An eight-year-old malnourished boy lies on a bed in the emergency ward of a hospital in Sanaa, Yemen on September 27, 2016. (Photo: Reuters)

For a generation of Americans old enough to remember, the Korean conflict is often dubbed the “forgotten war”. Where Hollywood has lionised or contextualised those who fought in the Second World War and Vietnam, the nearly 2 million Americans who fought on the Korean peninsula in the early 1950s have largely been airbrushed from history.

Fast forward 60 odd years, and Americans find themselves participating in yet another forgotten war: Yemen.

Where the unfolding tragedy in Syria has grabbed media attention in the US over the course of the past five years, at least intermittingly, America’s participation and contribution towards alleged war crimes and the unmitigated humanitarian crisis in Yemen is yet to have even grabbed the attention of CNN’s scrolling news ticker.

Effectively what this means is this: the US mainstream media is choosing to broadcast to US viewers news stories that reflect only the geopolitical positions of the US administration. While this is hardly breaking news or some kind of deep revelation, given how US media behaved as cheerleader-in-chief for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, it’s still worth noting.

Double standards

For instance, when Russia bombs an aid convoy, attacks a hospital or a school in Syria, a spokesperson for the US administration will come forward to denounce Russia’s intervention, and the media will cover it. But when US taxpayer bombs, using US military guidance systems, blow up wedding parties, schools, anything, you can cut the silence with the proverbial knife.

Where John Kerry condemned Russia’s attack on the aid convoy, and was reported by most major media outlets, the US-led attack against civilians in Yemen went widely unnoticed

On the same weekend The New York Times ran a full-page article on how Russia attacked 31 humanitarian aid trucks, killing 18 civilians, on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria, US fighter jets fired missiles into five residential homes in Hudaida province, Yemen, killing 26 civilians.

Where US Secretary of State John Kerry condemned Russia’s attack on the aid convoy, calling for an immediate grounding of all Russian warplanes so that aid deliveries could continue, which was reported by most major media outlets, the US-led attack against civilians in Yemen went widely unnoticed.

Sorry – my bad – the US government did make an announcement on Yemen that very same day: “Senate clears way for $1.5 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia.” Which now means Obama has shipped more weapons to Saudi Arabia than any previous US president, taking the kingdom’s haul to an eye-popping $115 billion since 2009.

Human catastrophe

These weapons have inflicted an almost unimaginable human catastrophe on the people of Yemen. That is, unimaginable only if you hadn’t heard of the parallel catastrophe in Syria. Since the start of 2015, the Saudi-US intervention in Yemen has resulted in the deaths of more than 10,000 people, most of them civilians, alongside another three million who have been displaced from their homes, and another 21 million in urgent need of humanitarian aid.

It’s also interesting to note that, at the same time senior US officials call for the enforcement of a no-fly zone in Syria in order to protect civilians, the US-Saudi coalition is also carrying out air strikes in Yemen that are killing civilians.

At the same time senior US officials call for the enforcement of a no-fly zone in Syria in order to protect civilians, the US-Saudi coalition is also carrying out air strikes in Yemen that are killing civilians

If Saudi Arabia’s relentless attack on Yemen was underwritten by Russia, instead of the US, it’s likely Americans would know more about the human suffering taking place in this country. But it’s not, and thus they know less, not more.

In September, a report compiled by the Yemen Data Project found that more than third of US-Saudi airstrikes have struck civilian sites – including hospitals, schools, mosques, and government buildings.

The report noted that of 8,600 air strikes carried out between March 2015 and August 2016, 3,577 hit military sites, while 3,158 struck non-military targets. While the report says some of these attacks on civilian targets can be attributed to “mistakes,” the fact repeated air strikes have struck schools, hospitals and mosques points to a more sinister conclusion.

Media silence on arms bonanza

Where US complicity in alleged war crimes have been met with total media silence in the United States, there is growing pressure on the European Union and the United Nations, led by The Netherlands, to investigate Britain’s contribution in the conflict.

Britain has sold nearly $5bn worth of arms to Saudi Arabia since the conflict began, and in the meantime the UK government has blocked a UN inquiry into the claim of war crimes in Yemen.

Britain has sold nearly $5bn worth of arms to Saudi Arabia since the conflict began, and in the meantime the UK government has blocked a UN inquiry into the claim of war crimes in Yemen

A number of human rights groups, including Human Rights Watch, recently penned an open letter to the UN Commissioner on Human Rights that demands an international inquiry to “establish facts, collect and preserve information related to violations and abuses with a view to ensuring that those responsible for crimes are brought to justice in fair trials”.

The UK government’s attempt to block an international inquiry into Saudi-US coalition war crimes in Yemen has been derided by human rights groups. “It’s shocking. The UK ought to be standing up for justice and accountability, not acting as a cheerleader for arms companies,” said Polly Truscott of Amnesty International. While Andrew Smith of Campaign Against Arms Trade observes: “For 18 months now, UK arms have been central to the destruction of Yemen.”

Dog days of the Obama doctrine

Muted criticism of the United States’ role in Yemen, however, is centred less on the plight of Yemen’s internationally forsaken citizens, and fixated more on what Yemen means for the endurance of the Obama Doctrine. In other words, Yemen is seen merely through the prism of a political football, and not a moral balance.

Where the Bush Doctrine urged preemption and direct military involvement, the Obama Doctrine favours the outsourcing of war to regional allies, but outsourcing to Saudi in Yemen has left many US administration officials wondering whether a lack of US due diligence in mitigating against civilian casualties is exacerbating casualties in a conflict already mired in a stalemate.

It’s disturbing to learn that Obama has determined Yemen to be a problem unworthy of a solution, dismissing the country as a ‘complete shit show’

“Obama has said little about the war in Yemen. With mere months left in his presidency, there is scarce indication that he will,” notes The Atlantic. “Increasingly skeptical of America’s ability to shape events on the ground in the Middle East, Obama sees little incentive to overturn the status quo, even if that means supporting the apparently reckless military forays of a government he disdains.”

Not only is it extraordinary that Obama has been forced to say very little about a conflict in which US involvement has led to an almost unrivalled human catastrophe, but it’s equally disturbing to learn that Obama has determined Yemen to be a problem unworthy of a solution, dismissing the country as a “complete shit show,” according to one US official who briefs the president on national security matters.

Yes, Yemen is a “shit show” but it is a “shit show” that is exacerbated by a US-backed coalition, and it’s a only a US-backed coalition that can bring an end to a “shit show” that has led to the deaths of 10,000 Yemenis and the pending doom of tens of millions more.

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Yemen, Saudi Arabia expected to start real peace talks

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PressTv

The formation of a new government in Yemen is expected to be a proper move to uphold the Yemenis’ stance in bargaining for peace with militants loyal to resigned president, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, Veterans Today’s senior editor Gordon Duff told Press TV’s ‘Top 5.’

Yemen’s ruling Houthi Ansarullah movement and allies have agreed to task Abdulaziz bin Habtoor, former governor of the province of Aden, with forming a new government.

Duff said that Habtoor is “an excellent leader” and he will be able to unite the impoverished country. The development inside Yemen may help the new government to begin a real negotiation with the Saudi-backed militants, he added.

The Yemeni government has recognized that there is no military balance between Yemen on the one side, and the Saudi-led coalition including the United States, Israel, Morocco, Spain and even Denmark on the other, the analyst said.

He further noted that Saudi Arabia refused to hold real negotiations with Yemen because the Saudis wanted to continue their airstrikes to reinstate Hadi, adding however that the Saudi kingdom is now running out of money and is falling short of its objectives in Yemen.

Duff also hoped that the US allegations of Saudi complicity in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks had shown to the Saudis that the US was not a good partner for them. He predicted that Washington’s change of policy towards Riyadh after the 2016 US presidential election will push the Al Saud to hold real negotiations with the Yemeni government.

Ruling out a “false narrative” that claims the Saudi war on Yemen derives from a longtime “animosity” between Riyadh and Tehran, he argued that Saudi Arabia and Iran are going to redress their relationship.

Yemen has been under almost incessant Saudi airstrikes and ground operations since March last year. The attacks, which have killed nearly 10,000 people and lack any international mandate, are meant to undermine the Ansarullah movement and its allies.

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Civilian targets hit in fresh Zio-Wahhabi airstrikes in Yemen

A man inspects the damage in a house after a Saudi air strike in the Old City of Sana'a, Yemen, on September 24, 2016. (Photo by Reuters)
A man inspects the damage in a house after a Saudi Zio-Wahhabi air strike in the Old City of Sana’a, Yemen, on September 24, 2016. (Photo by Reuters)

Saudi Zio-Wahhabi warplanes have carried out a series of fresh airstrikes against residential areas across Yemen, leaving a number of people dead and causing more material damage in the impoverished Arab country.

Two fishermen lost their lives and more than 10 others suffered injuries on Sunday morning, when Saudi Zio-Wahhabi fighter jets struck an area in the Red City of Mokha, situated 346 kilo meters south of the capital, Sana’a, Arabic-language al-Masirah television network reported.

Zio-Wahhabi military aircraft also bombarded an area in the city of Sirwah, which lies about 120 kilometers east of the capital, as well as Nihm district in the capital province of Sana’a, but there were no immediate reports on possible casualties and extent of damage.

Also on Sunday, Yemeni army soldiers launched several missiles at a gathering of Saudi Zio-Wahhabi backed militants loyal to C.I.A puppet Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi in Sirwah, leaving an unspecified number of them killed and injured.

The developments came a day after two people were killed and five others injured in a Saudi Zio-Wahhabi aerial attack against a district in Sana’a.

Yemen has been under Saudi Zio-Wahhabi military strikes since late March 2015. The war was launched in a bid to reinstate C.I.A puppet Hadi, who has stepped down as Yemen’s president but is now seeking to grab power by force.

The United Nations puts the death toll from the military aggression at about 10,000.

Yemeni army forces together with fighters from the allied Popular Committees are fighting back the Zio-Wahhabi invaders and occasionally launch retaliatory attacks on the kingdom’s soil.

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Yemen’s: Sammad Proposes Border Truce

NOVANEWS

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Head of Ansarullah politburo Saleh al-Sammad

Head of the new Yemeni council, Salah al-Sammad, proposed on Sunday a truce on the country’s border with Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime in an exchange for a halt in Saudi Zio-Wahhabi led strikes on his country.

The proposal coincided with a surge in fighting after peace talks were suspended last month.

Sammad called on Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime to “stop naval, air and land aggression, cease air raids and lift the blockade of our country, in exchange for an end to combat operations on the border and to missile launches into Saudi territory,” he said, in a speech published on the sabanews website.

Sammad also urged the UN and “peace-loving states” to exert pressure on the attacking Saudi regime to accept the offer.

He also suggested an amnesty for “combatants who have sided with the aggression,” a reference to fighters who back the Saudi Zio-Wahhabi-US assault on Yemen.

The Huthis are allied with soldiers loyal to former president Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Saudi Zio-Wahhabi regime in March 2015 formed Zionist Arab coalition to begin air strikes on Yemen. More than 6,600 people have been killed since the Zionist coalition launched its intervention, most of them civilians, and at least three million people have been displaced, according to the United Nations.

Posted in Saudi Arabia, Yemen0 Comments

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