Obama: America “Exceptional” So We Don’t Prosecute Torturers

NOVANEWS

Legal experts and human rights advocates says prosecutions must follow Senate’s report on CIA torture as president says grave violations of domestic and international law should be kept “where they belong—in the past”

Despite executive summary of Senate panel’s report on Tuesday, President Obama is still unwilling to pursue real accountability for those who designed, approved, and executed the CIA’s torture program under his predecessor, George W. Bush. (Photo: AP file)

In his first official remarks following Tuesday’s release of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s report on the torture program conducted by the CIA during the presidency of George W. Bush, President Barack Obama on Tuesday night indicated that the abuses detailed in the report conducted in the name of the American people—described as “horrific,” “ruthless” and “much more brutal than previously thought”—should not be followed by further inquiries or prosecutions as many have long urged.

In his remarks, Obama acknowledged that “no nation is perfect,” but argued that “one of the strengths that makes America exceptional is our willingness to openly confront our past, face our imperfections, make changes and do better.”

“This is a wake-up call to the USA, they must disclose the full truth about the human rights violations, hold perpetrators accountable and ensure justice for the victims. This is not a policy nicety, it is a requirement under international law.”
—Erika Guevara, Amnesty International

Backed by his interpretation of “American Exceptionalism,” Obama suggested that the release of the report—which his administration fought tirelessly to restrict—was all that was necessary in order for the nation to move forward.

“Rather than another reason to refight old arguments,” Obama continued, “I hope that today’s report can help us leave these techniques where they belong—in the past.”

Legal experts and human rights advocates, however, have taken a decidedly different approach to the report as many renewed a simple message in the wake of Tuesday’s release, saying: If gross crimes were committed, prosecutors should be assigned and the criminals should be tried and punished.

The executive summary of the committee’s investigative report (pdf) spans 525 pages and chronicles many of the internal machinations and communications relating to how the CIA conducted its abuse of suspected terrorism suspects—including tactics and abuses much more brutal than previously been acknowledged by any government agency. Though many of the lawmakers who have endorsed the report, as well as current and former U.S. officials, have mirrored Obama’s position by saying or suggesting its release should “close this disgraceful chapter” of American history, organizations like the ACLU, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Amnesty International, and a host of other groups and individuals argue that if justice and the rule of law mean anything, the report should be the beginning—not the end—of accountability for those who designed, approved, and executed this program.

“The long-delayed Senate report proves what we have been saying since 2006: that the CIA engaged in a sophisticated program of state-sanctioned torture, notable for its elaborate planning and ruthless application,” said Baher Azmy, the legal director of the Center for Constitutional Rights. “We renew our demand for accountability for those individuals responsible for the CIA torture program. They should be prosecuted in U.S. courts; and if our government continues to refuse to hold them accountable, they must be pursued internationally under the principles of universal jurisdiction.”

“Instead of focusing on the illegal nature of the torture, investigators worked to document torture’s ineffectiveness. The debate, now, is whether torture worked. It clearly didn’t. But the debate should be: Why the hell aren’t these torturous liars in jail?”
—Trevor Timm, Freedom of the Press FoundationThe ACLU has put forth a blueprint for accountabilitywhich includes appointing a special prosecutor; deeply reforming the CIA; apologies and compensation to the victims of torture; honoring those officials who resisted or refused to participate in the program; and pushing for transparency beyond what is contained in the Senate report. The full Senate report is more than 6,000 pages, and thousands of other pages of documents related to the CIA program were withheld by the White House for review.

Hina Shamsi, who heads the ACLU’s national security project, said the story of U.S. torture under the Bush presidency should not end with impunity for those involved.

“The release of the report is a tipping point and a reminder that the United States has never fully reckoned with a past that includes waterboarding, stress positions, beatings, sleep deprivation, threats of harm to children and other family members, among many devastatingly cruel acts,” Shamsi said. “Once again, Americans, all of us, have an opportunity to choose how we end this story, whether that’s responsibly, with a full return to our laws and values, or shamefully, by failing to act now that the report summary is released.”

Erika Guevara, head of the Americas division of Amnesty International, said that under international law, the U.S. really should have no choice other than to prosecute.

“The declassified information contained in the summary, while limited, is a reminder to the world of the utter failure of the USA to end the impunity enjoyed by those who authorized and used torture and other ill-treatment,” Guevara said in a statement. “This is a wake-up call to the USA, they must disclose the full truth about the human rights violations, hold perpetrators accountable and ensure justice for the victims. This is not a policy nicety, it is a requirement under international law.”

Though the Senate’s exhaustive report has been praised by many, those advocating for prosecutions of the torture program’s architects—including high-ranking officials like former president George W. Bush, vice president Dick Cheney, and others—point out the panel’s investigation into torture spent too much time obsessing over whether or not torture garnered “actionable” or “valuable” intelligence information, a question that should have no bearing when it comes to violations of domestic and international law, not to mention deep moral codes.

As Trevor Timm, executive director of the Freedom of the Press Foundation, wrote in the immediate wake of the report’s release: “Instead of focusing on the illegal nature of the torture, Senator Dianne Feinstein’s investigators worked to document torture’s ineffectiveness. The debate, now, is whether torture worked. It clearly didn’t. But the debate should be: Why the hell aren’t these torturous liars in jail?”

As the ACLU’s Shamsi points out, “The crime of torture has no statute of limitations when torture risks or results in serious injury or death, and the U.S. government has the obligation under international law to investigate any credible evidence that torture has been committed. If there’s sufficient evidence of criminal conduct—and it’s hard to see how there isn’t—the offenders should be prosecuted. In our system, no one should be above the law, yet only a handful of mainly low-level personnel have been criminally prosecuted for abuse.”

Posted in Human Rights, USA1 Comment

‘The Alarm Bells are Ringing’: From Athletes to Environmentalists, a Universal Call for Racial Justice Emerges

NOVANEWS

While the protests over deaths of Eric Garner and Mike Brown refuse to stand down, leading environmentalists, labor protesters and others show their solidarity saying: “These issues are not separate.”

A protester in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania holds a sign quoting Dr. Martin Luther King: "An injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." (Photo: Mark Dixon/cc/flickr)

A protester in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania holds a sign quoting Dr. Martin Luther King: “An injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” (Photo: Mark Dixon/cc/flickr)

With the nation’s streets still filled with protesters and a plan for thousands to march on Washington brewing, the call for justice for Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and other black victims of police violence has only grown stronger. In the days and weeks since two grand juries failed to indict the police officers who killed the two men, expressions of solidarity have poured in from all corners—from professional athletes to fast food workers, education leaders and environmental groups, with the message that an injustice against one is an injustice against us all.

On Monday evening, several NBA players took the court wearing t-shirts that read, “I can’t breathe,” a reference to the final utterance issued by Eric Garner, who was forced into a chokehold by New York Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo on July 17. “It’s not a Cavs thing,”said Cleveland Cavaliers star Lebron James, who was one of the players to don the shirt, before the game. “It’s a worldly thing.”

The symbolic action was not the first expression of support by a professional sports team. Members of the Ferguson community’s hometown football team, the St. Louis Rams, alsosignaled their solidarity with the movement when they walked on the field on November 30 holding their hands in the air in what has become the signature “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” gesture of the Ferguson protests.

The idea that the demonstrations—sparked by incidents of police violence against black individuals in the communities of Ferguson, Missouri; Staten Island, New York; and elsewhere—have “worldly” resonance is a connection that the environmental movement has also been quick to make.

The argument that environmental issues are inherently intertwined with social justice issues is one that has been voiced repeatedly. But in the wake of the recent grand jury decisions, leading environmental groups have come out strong in support of those in the streets, arguing that a world that breeds such inequalities is fundamentally opposed to the idea of a sustainable society.

“We cannot lead a meaningful fight for the environment without first taking steps to address the unequal valuation of life within it.”
—Erich Pica, Friends of the Earth

“We cannot lead a meaningful fight for the environment without first taking steps to address the unequal valuation of life within it,” Friends of the Earth President Erich Pica wrote in a statement this weekend. “The preventable deaths of Mike Brown, Darrien Hunt, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Aiyana Jones, Oscar Grant and dozens of others bespeak not just a systematic injustice, but of a cancer in our national consciousness that seems to place little value on the lives of black and brown people.”

“Our mission is to create a healthier and more just world, but we have little hope of success if our nation cannot agree on the definitions of chokehold, unarmed and murder; let alone clean air and water,” Pica concluded.

Following the Ferguson grand jury decision last month, 350.org Executive Director May Boeve issued a call to the climate movement to stand in solidarity with the protesters there, saying, “their fight is fundamentally linked with ours for a healthy and livable future for all. It’s past time to replace the broken system that continually devastates communities of color, and reform the bankrupt laws that put over-reactive self-defense above the dignity of life.”

And Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune agreed, saying: “These issues are not separate.”

“The Sierra Club’s mission is to ‘enlist humanity’ to explore, enjoy, and protect the planet. That mission, which applies to everyone, cannot be achieved when people’s rights are being violated and their safety and dignity are being threatened on a routine basis,” Brune wrotethis weekend. “This must stop.”

Low wage workers protesting for a higher minimum wage also threw their support behind the protests against racial profiling and police brutality, staging solidarity “die-ins” and chanting “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” during last week’s national day of action.

Journalist Sarah Jaffe, who wrote about the converging demonstrations for Salon, spoke with St. Louis Burger King worker Carlos Robinson who said that the actions last week “felt different because we were doing it for the Mike Brown situation and trying to show people the significance between injustice in our workplaces and injustice in our communities.” Robinson, who had been organizing for $15 an hour and a union for about seven months, said the demonstrators “know just as well as we do that there’s injustice in our communities and there’s injustice in our fast food places and we need to do something about it.”

And labor leader Randi Weingarten, head of the American Federation of Teachers, wasarrested along with her partner Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum and several other prominent rabbis while protesting in New York City following the Eric Garner grand jury announcement last week.

“Today, the alarm bells are ringing in town squares and city streets everywhere, urging everyone still holding out hope for a more just world to rise up and get busy making it.”
—Randall Amster, Georgetown University

Meanwhile, the demonstrations have yet to cease. For the third night in a row, protesters on Monday night rallied in the streets of Berkeley, California and organizers have called for a mass mobilization in New York City on Saturday, December 13. Further, Reverend Al Sharpton and his National Action Network is organizing a march on Washington, D.C. on Saturday to demand congressional action on police brutality.

Onlookers believe that this moment, the growing call for racial justice which continues to sweep the nation, has the potential to make significant change if enough people join that cry.

“Martin Luther King Jr. once spoke of the perils of ‘sleeping through a revolution,'” writesRandall Amster, Director of the Program on Justice and Peace at Georgetown University. “Today, the alarm bells are ringing in town squares and city streets everywhere, urging everyone still holding out hope for a more just world to rise up and get busy making it.”

Posted in USA0 Comments

Ferguson Is Baghdad Is New York Is Kabul

NOVANEWS

Our wars abroad are mirror images of the war at home.

Police with wooden sticks stand guard next to a protester with a sign that reads “Justice for Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and justice for us all” Monday in downtown Seattle. (Photo: AP/Ted S. Warren)

There is a pattern emerging in my Facebook feed this week. One group of friends has been posting stories of police brutality and protests accompanied by personal statements of outrage. Another group has been remarking on the disgusting revelations from the Senate Intelligence Committee’s CIA torture report and the need for accountability. There is little overlap between the two groups, and yet the common threads between the U.S.’ foreign and domestic policies are disturbingly uncanny.

Whether on the streets of Baghdad or Ferguson, soldiers and militarized police forces have historically enforced control, not law. Behind the prison walls of Guantanamo and Texas, some authorities have tortured and brutalized rather than interrogated. They have not protected nor served; they have attacked and killed. They have not gathered intelligence; they have violated people’s humanity.

I am an immigrant to the United States. The names of those killed and tortured in Iraq and Afghanistan invoke in my imagination people who look like me, people I could have known, who could be my family. In the faces of those killed and tortured in Ferguson and Los Angeles, I see my neighbors and friends, people I know and love and think of as family. These are not separate and distinct. The pain I feel while reading the CIA report is as strong as the grief that comes from perusing the images of unarmed people of color who have been killed by U.S. police. The U.S. tortures and imprisons people of color both at home and abroad.

Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts people of color, in particular black men in the U.S., while detainees from the “war on terror” in Guantanamo, Bagram, Abu Ghraib and elsewhere, have been almost entirely brown, Muslim men. Just as people of color, in particular black men, are disproportionately more likely to be killed domestically by police officers, U.S. soldiers have been deployed in poor countries such as Iraq and Afghanistan, where the nonwhite populations of Muslim men, women and children are victimized through shootings and raids.

Among the revelations in the report on CIA tactics is the story of an Afghan man named Gul Rahman who literally froze to death while in U.S. custody. Rahman was chained with only a single piece of clothing covering the top half of his body and “died of hypothermia.” In 2012, at least 10 inmates in the Texas prison system died of heat stroke. An unnamed corrections officer told The New York Times that he worried about “boiling [inmates] in their cells.”

Also revealed in grisly detail in the report on CIA practices is the barbarism of waterboarding detainees such as Abu Zubaydah and Khalid Sheikh Mohammad. But water torture is an age-old American tradition, historically practiced domestically, as professor Anne-Marie Cusac discussed in her 2009 book “Cruel and Unusual: The Culture of Punishment in America.” Inmates in CIA custody were also subjected to a horrific practice called “rectal feedings,” which resulted in serious injuries. But similar techniques have been used on U.S. inmates domestically, as this report on torture in American prisons reveals. Inmates in federal and state prisons describe being sodomized by flashlights and even having chemical fire extinguishers sprayed inside them.

The brutality of CIA interrogators as revealed in the Senate committee report was part of the project of war that includes the open aggression of U.S. troops on the streets of Baghdad and Kabul in the post 9/11 years. Similarly, the savagery inside U.S. prisons goes hand in hand with the killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice and the countless slayings of unarmed black men in the U.S. Our wars abroad are mirror images of the war at home.

Simply comparing photographs of police in Ferguson to U.S. troops on the battlefield is instructive. We have turned cities into war zones and those cities could be either here in the U.S. or in Iraq or Afghanistan. It is not the case that U.S. police are simply hoping to emulate the military. In fact, the Pentagon has literally outfitted domestic law enforcement with the weapons of war.

Often used to justify the trigger-happy behavior of U.S. police is an assertion that policing is a dangerous and “thankless” job and that, in facing off with potential criminals at every turn, “it’s either you or them.” Similarly, U.S. soldiers in the battlefield have fired at civilians, claiming they were under attack. This siege mentality is a convenient cover by armed men using the authority of their badge or uniform to condone their killings.

Just as police officers such as Darren Wilson and Daniel Pantaleo are almost never convicted for killing people, it is similarly rare for U.S. soldiers to face justice despite overwhelming evidence of their wrongdoing. For example, Amnesty International maintains that of the 1,800 Afghans killed by U.S. troops in the five year period 2009-2013, only six cases actually went to trial.

None of this should surprise us. After all, presidents have explicitly declared wars on both domestic and foreign fronts. After Nixon pronounced a “war on drugs” in 1971 during the late stages of the Vietnam War, that domestic war has been extended by every president since. Criminalizing drug use and sales has driven much of the U.S.’ domestic incarceration. And with the advent of the post 9/11 war on terror, our imprisonment of “terror suspects” and foreign fighters has increased dramatically. The two wars have occurred in parallel with each other. Armed men have been perpetrators, protected by elites, while poor people of color have been the primary targets and victims.

Not enough progressive Americans make the connection between these wars we wage simultaneously. Whether it is our federal or state officials that are responsible for killings and torture at home or abroad, ultimately we fund it all through our tax dollars and sanction it all through our silence. Too many liberal activists fixate on the effects of U.S. foreign policy while ignoring what is happening on our doorstep. And too many of us who work for justice domestically overlook what is done to our brothers and sisters abroad. If we are to transform the U.S.’ approach to violence we need to draw links between right here and far away. Ferguson is Baghdad is New York is Kabul.

Posted in USA0 Comments

What Ferguson, Eric Garner, and CIA Torture Have in Common

NOVANEWS

From black sites to #BlackLivesMatter, it’s time to end impunity for criminals with badges.

(Photo: Shane T. McCoy/Wikimedia)

There’s no better way for Washington to commemorate Human Rights Day than by letting the public finally learn the truth about torture. And there’s no better way for concerned Americans to do so than by raising our voices to challenge the compounding crimes of our lawless agencies.

Washington promised that, after years of stonewalling by the CIA and White House transcending both of the major political parties, we would finally learn some glimmers of truth when the Senate released a heavily redacted summary of its historic 6,000-page report on CIA torture crimes.

The timing could not be more poignant. The report was released on the eve of Human Rights Day, and in the wake of an ongoing, diverse, and energetic national grassroots movement for police accountability.

Parallels between CIA torture and police murders in New York, Ferguson, Cleveland, and elsewhere may be easy to overlook. Unfortunately, both sets of abuses reflect similar patterns: severe crimes committed by powerful people, officially endorsed cover-ups, and formal legal impunity that compounds the original crimes.

This week, on Human Rights Day, people in a dozen U.S. cities will take action to connect these abuses. We insist on nothing more than justice for all, including public servants.

A problem with many faces

CIA torturers and police officers who murder innocent unarmed Americans share one thing in common: impunity for violent crimes that violate global human rights commitments. The impunity they share reveals systems of separate — and unequal — justice across the United States.

Communities responding to impunity for police murders in Ferguson, New York City, and elsewhere across the country seek goals including federal laws to end racial profiling. Incidentally, body cameras are not a solution. They will neither ensure accountability for discrete cases — remember Eric Garner? — nor will they offer even transparency for abusive patterns & practices.

At root, we seek accountability for the arbitrary use of force.

Police violence in our communities is one example. CIA torture, or the Agency’s documented assassination of U.S. citizens (even their children) without trial, is another.

The Senate’s report revealed previously secret details about human rights abuses committed in our names — and with our resources — vastly beyond the little known to this point.

Crimes, whoever commits them

It confirmed, for example, that CIA personnel violated even the illegally permissive limits contrived by the Bush-era Justice Department to enable torture. In other words, the report confirmed that CIA officials broke the law. That’s why it was secret so long.

The illegality of torture is obvious to anyone who recalls the Second World War, when our nation waged a sustained global struggle before sending a Supreme Court Justice to establish the legal precedent that torture is a crime: full stop, with no exceptions.

But the only CIA official to ever face justice related to torture, John Kiriakou, was one who tried to blow the whistle.

Acts of torture are real crimes with actual victims, including U.S. service members who died at the hands of militants inspired by torture to take up arms against the United States. Police murders are also real crimes with actual victims, including surviving families who visited Washington recently to plead for justice.

Failing to indict murderers because they wear a badge is no different than covering up details of torture by government secret agents. In both cases, our system turns a blind eye to crimes by officials — even violent crimes that offend our species’ most fundamental commitments.

Justice in America: Protecting the powerful

In both St. Louis and New York, grand juries swayed by prosecutors masquerading as defense attorneys failed to even indict killer cops — including one caught on videotape, suggesting that proposals for body cameras are a red herring.

Similarly, the CIA’s ongoing history of lies, destruction of evidence, and even espionage against the people’s representatives has allowed grave crimes to go unpunished.

Despite their explicitness, legal prohibitions on torture, or police murdering innocents (or for that matter, our rights once guaranteed under the First and Fourth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution) have been reduced in reality to mere legal formalisms ignored in practice.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve helped peacefully seize shopping malls in St. Louis, occupy Union Station in Washington, DC, and block highways and major intersections because, as a lawyer, I swore an oath to “support the Constitution and laws of the United States.” Senators also swear a similar oath, but violate it every time they decide to “look forwards, not backwards” to ignore official crimes.

I also helped deliver a quarter million petitions to retiring Senator Mark Udall (D-CO), whose seat on the Intelligence Committee has given him a chance to read the secret report and grow outraged by its findings.

When the rest of us come to understand just how far torture extended, we should remember that “power concedes nothing without a demand” and make our voices heard.

Posted in Human Rights, USA0 Comments

Jews created modern American mass culture

NOVANEWS

Rabbi cartoons, Rabbi cartoon, funny, Rabbi picture, Rabbi pictures, Rabbi image, Rabbi images, Rabbi illustration, Rabbi illustrations

“Jews created most of modern American mass culture, from the movies, to television, to the fashion business, cosmetics, the music industry, mass-market paperbacks, all these ways of packaging and selling democratic pleasures to the masses.”

I’ll give you three guess who made the preceding statement about Jews creating modern American mass culture. Was it an “anti-Semitic conspiracy theorist”? A “racist, bigoted hater” of the Jews? An evil neo-Nazi who blames the Jews for all the problems facing the world?

Actually, the quote was found in an article recently published by Tablet Magazine entitled, “Do Jews Carry Trauma in Our Genes? A Conversation With Rachel Yehuda.” For those unfamiliar with Tablet, it is a highly respected and influential Jewish media outlet focusing on Jewish culture, arts, and politics. I read the article the other day, and found the controversial yet undoubtedly true statement in one of the questions posed by the Jewish journalist, David Samuels, who wrote the article.

I highlight it here just to demonstrate, once again, that Jews themselves openly admit and even boast about their power and influence, including the fact that modern American popular culture was created by and is perpetuated by Jews.

If you’re still wondering how modern American popular culture and society became so debased, perverted, and crass, where sexual degeneracy, homosexuality, and anti-Christian, anti-White images and themes run rampant, just remember who created it. It’s no secret anymore; Jews openly admit and celebrate these facts.

Posted in USA, ZIO-NAZI0 Comments

ISIS leader: the group’s rise would not be possible without US prisons

NOVANEWS

A former jaildbird at Camp Bucca, a US-run prison in southern Iraq, says the rise of the ISIS would not be possible without the US prisons.

In an exclusive interview to the Guardian, Abu Ahmed, now a senior official within ISIS, reveals how ISIS might never have formed if US detention centers hadn’t existed.

Abu Ahmed said that he along with other prisoners quickly realised that far from their worst fears, the US-run prison provided an extraordinary opportunity. “We could never have all got together like this in Baghdad, or anywhere else.” But at the Camp Bucca “we were not only safe, but we were only a few hundred metres away from the entire al-Qaida leadership.”

He added that the Abubakr Al-Baghdadi was respected very much by the US army. “If he wanted to visit people in another camp he could, but we couldn’t. And all the while, a new strategy, which he was leading, was rising under their noses, and that was to build the Islamic State.

“If there was no American prison in Iraq, there would be no IS now. Bucca was a factory. It made us all. It built our ideology.”

“We had so much time to sit and plan,” he continued. “It was the perfect environment. We all agreed to get together when we got out. The way to reconnect was easy. We wrote each other’s details on the elastic of our boxer shorts. When we got out, we called. Everyone who was important to me was written on white elastic. I had their phone numbers, their villages. By 2009, many of us were back doing what we did before we were caught. But this time we were doing it better.”

The first thing he did when he was safe in west Baghdad was to undress, then carefully take a pair of scissors to his underwear. “I cut the fabric from my boxers and all the numbers were there. We reconnected. And we got to work.” Across Iraq, other ex-inmates were doing the same. “It really was that simple,” Abu Ahmed said, smiling for the first time in our conversation as he recalled how his captors had been outwitted. “Boxers helped us win the war.”

Posted in Middle East, USA0 Comments

JEW GUILTY OF CHILD PORNOGRAPHY

NOVANEWS

Activist guilty of kiddie porn

A Time magazine poster boy for immigration reform was convicted Wednesday of child pornography charges and faces deportation after serving a lengthy term in prison.

BY 
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Roy Naim
Roy Naim, 30

A Time magazine poster boy for immigration reform was convicted Wednesday of child pornography charges and faces deportation after serving a lengthy term in prison.

Roy Naim, 30, was featured in a June 2012 cover story under the headline “We are Americans,” and the Israeli national portrayed himself as an activist.

Federal agents uncovered evidence that the activist purchased at least three illicit videos from another pervert in Louisiana of a 15-year-old boy performing a sex act.

Naim was convicted of attempted exploitation and possession of child pornography, which calls for a term of at least 15 to 30 years in prison when he is sentenced by Judge Nicholas Garaufis. The pervert showed no reaction to the verdict as family members wept and moaned in the courtroom.

Posted in USA, ZIO-NAZI0 Comments

Nazi Torture-Pride March

In an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” on Sunday, former Vice-President Racist Zionist Dick Cheney told host Chuck Todd that he was “sick and tired of Americans being ashamed of our beautiful legacy of torture” and that he was organizing the first “National Torture-Pride March” to take place in Washington in January.

“This is a chance for all of us torturers to say, ‘Look at us, this is who we are,’” Cheney, who will be the Grand Marshall of the parade, said.

The former Vice-President said that he was organizing the march to inspire “the millions of American kids who want to be torturers when they grow up but are afraid they’ll catch hell for it.”

“We’ll be there to say, ‘We’re torturers and we’re damn proud of it—join us,’” Cheney said.

Posted in USA0 Comments

Racist Jewish Giuliani Blames African Americans For Police Killings

NOVANEWS

Rudy Giuliani Finds A Way To Blame African Americans For Police Killings

BY IGOR VOLSKY

Rudy Giuliani Finds A Way To Blame African Americans For Police Killings

Rudolph W. Giuliani 

Responding to a grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for killing 18-year-old Michael Brown, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said on Sunday that the black community is more responsible for the deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of police than the officers themselves.

“I do believe that there is more interaction and more unfair interaction between police officers, white and black,” he admitted during an appearance on Fox News Sunday. “But I think just as much, if not more, responsibility is on the black community to reduce the reason why the police officers are assigned in such large numbers to the black community. It’s because blacks commit murder eight times more per capita than any other group in our society.”

Giuliani gave this answer in reaction to a Pew poll showing 70 percent of African Americans saying that they are treated less fairly by police. Only 37 percent of whites made the same complaint.

Last week, the former mayor made headlines for claiming that black-on-black crime was “the reason for the heavy police presence in the black community” and arguing that “the danger to a black child…is another black.”

But in these comments, Giuliani seems to be going further, implying that police are justified in assuming that all black people are criminals because of the high crime rates in their communities. During the show, Giuliani also claimed that Darren Wilson was justified in killing Brown and that prosecutors shouldn’t have even tried to indict him in front of a grand jury.

“I don’t see how this case normally would have even been brought to a grand jury,” he said. “This is the kind of case — had it not had the racial overtones and the national publicity — where a prosecutor would have come to a conclusion that there is not enough evidence to present to a grand jury.”

Later in the program, Marc Morial, the president of the National Urban League, pushed back against the argument that protests in Ferguson are ignoring the real problem of so-called black-on-black crime.

“About 84 percent of whites are murdered by other whites and the concern about violence in the black community is pervasive,” he said. “But the protests are directed as a response to the system of the killings of unarmed black men and the lack of accountability when those events take place.”

Some have pointed out that there is no such thing as black-on-black crime, arguing that crime is driven by proximity, not race. As the Daily Beast’s Jamelle Bouie has explained, “If African-Americans are more likely to be robbed, or injured, or killed by other African-Americans, it’s because they tend to live in the same neighborhoods as each other.” In fact, “crime rates among African-Americans, and black youth in particular, have taken a sharp drop.”

Posted in USA0 Comments

TRNN Exclusive: The man that “shoed” Bush

NOVANEWS

 

Muntadhar Al-Zaidi from Beirut: I expected to be killed the day I threw my shoes at Bush –   May 22, 2010

Bio

Muntadhar al-Zaidi (Arabic: منتظر الزيدي‎ Muntaẓar az-Zaydī) was an Iraqi broadcast journalist who served as a correspondent for Iraqi-owned, Egyptian-based Al-Baghdadia TV. Al-Zaidi’s reports often focused on the plight of widows, orphans, and children in the Iraq War. On November 16, 2007, al-Zaidi was kidnapped by unknown assailants in Baghdad. He was also previously twice arrested by the United States armed forces. On December 14, 2008, al-Zaidi shouted “this is for the widows and orphans” and threw his shoes at then-US president George W. Bush during a Baghdad press conference. Al-Zaidi suffered injuries as he was taken into custody and was tortured during his initial detention. There were calls throughout the Middle East to place the shoes in an Iraqi museum, but the shoes were later destroyed by American and Iraqi security forces. Al-Zaidi’s shoeing inspired many similar incidents of political protest around the world. On February 20, 2009, al-Zaidi received a 90-minute trial by the Central Criminal Court of Iraq. On March 12, 2009, he was sentenced to three years in prison for assaulting a foreign head of state during an official visit. On April 7 the sentence was reduced to one year from three years. He was released on 15 September 2009 for good behaviour, after serving nine months of the sentence.

Posted in Iraq, USA0 Comments

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