Archive | July 26th, 2020

A Zionist attack on late American-Palestinian scholar Edward Said’s legacy

Caroline Glick
By Lawrence Davidson

Meeting Caroline Glick

I travelled to Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories in the early 2000s with the progressive group Faculty for Israeli-Palestinian Peace. We made an effort to gain insight into most of the players in the conflict, and so a series of interviews was arranged with members of the Israeli right wing. I remember that one of them was Caroline Glick (pictured above), an ardent American-Israeli Zionist. She lectured us on the positive personal relationships allegedly prevalent between Israeli Jews and Palestinians. 

It was an interesting and somewhat embarrassing experience. Glick and I are both American and both Jewish. Growing up, I had this understanding that American plus Jewish always meant being anti-racist. To be so was, in my mind, the prime lesson of modern Jewish history. What being anti-racist meant to Glick was unclear. She spent the better part of an hour giving us a defence of Israeli-Jewish treatment of Palestinians based on the classic “some of my best friends are Black” (read Palestinian) defence. In the words of the New York Times journalist John Eligon, this line of argument “has so often been relied on by those facing accusations of racism that it has become shorthand for weak denials of bigotry – a punch line about the absence of thoughtfulness and rigour in our conversations about racism”. And so it was with Glick, who explained that she, and many other Israeli Jews, had Palestinians who do small jobs for them and are treated well, and that this proves a lack of cultural and societal racism. It was such a vacuous argument that I remember feeling embarrassed for her. 

Things haven’t gotten much better when it comes to Ms Glick’s worldview. She is now a senior columnist at Israel Hayom (Israel Today, a pro-Netanyahu newspaper owned by the family of Sheldon Adelson) and contributor to such questionable US outlets as Breitbart NewsShealso directs the Israeli Security Project at the David Horowitz Freedom Center. There can be little doubt that she continues to see the world through the distorting lens of a particularly hardline variant of Zionism.  

Glick’s attack on Edward Said’s legacy 

Recently, Caroline Glick launched an attack on the legacy of the late American-Palestinian scholar and teacher Edward Said. Entitled “Edward Said, prophet of political violence in America”, it was recently (7 July 2020) published in the US by Newsweek – a news magazine with an increasingly pro-Zionist editorial stand. As it turns out, one cannot find a better example of how ideology can distort one’s outlook to the point of absurdity. Below is an analysis of Glick’s piece in a point-by-point fashion. Ultimately, the ideological basis for her argument will become clear. 

1. Glick begins by resurrecting a 20-year-old event. “On 3 July 2000, an incident occurred along the Lebanese border with Israel that, at the time, seemed both bizarre and… unimportant. That day, Columbia University Professor Edward Said was photographed on the Hezbollah-controlled Lebanese side of the border with Israel throwing a rock at an Israel Defence Forces watchtower 30 feet away.” She goes on to describe this act as “Said’s rock attack on Israel” and the “soldiers protecting their border”.

We need some context to put all of this in perspective: Israel is an expansionist state, and the original Zionist aim (as presented to the Paris Peace Conference following World War I) was to incorporate parts of southern Lebanon into what is now Israel. Southern Lebanon also briefly became a staging area for Palestinian retaliatory attacks into Israel. Thus, Israel invaded Lebanon multiple times only to be forced to withdraw in the face of resistance led by Hezbollah, a strong Lebanese Shia militia in control of much of southern Lebanon.

Said relates that during his 2000 visit to the Lebanese border with his family, he threw a pebble (not a “rock”) at a deserted Israeli watchtower (no Israeli soldiers were “defending their border”). Said saw this as a symbolic act of defiance against Israeli occupation. Over the years stone throwing by Palestinian youth had become just such a symbolic act. And, it was from their example that Said might have taken his cue.

2. However, Glick wants to draw highly questionable consequences from Said’s act. She tells us that “with the hindsight of 20 years, it was a seminal moment and a harbinger for the mob violence now taking place in many parts of America”. By the way, the “mob violence” in America she is referring to is the mass protests against police brutality that followed the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police on 25 May 2020.

3. Now that sounds a bit odd. How does Glick manage this segue from Edward Said’s symbolic stone toss in the year 2000 to nationwide inner-city rebellions against police brutality in 2020 America? Here is the contorted sequence she offers: 

(a) Said was a terrorist because he was an influential member of the alleged “terrorist organisation”, the Palestinian Liberation Organisation (PLO). “Terrorist organisation” is a standard Zionist descriptor of most Palestinian organisations. Actually, the PLO is the legally recognised representative of the Palestinian people and as such has carried on both an armed and a diplomatic struggle to liberate Palestine from Israeli occupation. In 1993, the PLO recognised Israel’s right to exist. This made little difference to the Zionist right wing which, like Glick, continued to use the terrorist tag for propaganda purposes. It is to be noted that all liberation movements are considered to be “terrorist” by those they fight against. And, indeed, both sides in such a struggle usually act in this fashion on occasion. Certainly, Israel is no innocent in this regard. 

(b) For Glick, Said’s alleged terrorist connection transforms his “rock attack” into a terrorist act. This is simply an ad hominem assertion on Glick’s part. There is no evidence that Said ever engaged in any act, including the tossing of stones, that can sanely be characterised as terrorism.

(c) Glick tells us that, at the same time Said was “committing a terrorist attack” on Israel, he was also “the superstar of far-left intellectuals”. It is hard to know what she means here by “far-left”. It seems to be another ad hominem slander. Said was a scholar of Comparative Literature and, when not in the classroom, he advocated for the political and human rights of oppressed Palestinians – how “far-left” is that?

(d) Nonetheless, Glick goes on to assert that as a “far-left” academic, Said waged a “nihilistic” and “anti-intellectual” offensive against Western thought. He did so in a well-known work entitled Orientalism published in 1978.

What does Orientalism actually say? Using mostly 19th century literary and artistic examples, the book documents the prevailing Western perception of the Near East and North Africa, which stands in for the Orient. This perception reflects a basically bipolar worldview – one which, according to Said, reserved for the West a superior image of science and reason, prosperity and high culture, and for the Orient an inferior somewhat mysterious and effeminate image of the “other” fated for domination by the West. Over time this view became pervasive in the West and influenced not only literary and artistic views of the Orient, but also impacted political, historical, anthropological and other non-fictional interpretations. Having helped create a superior sense of self, this orientalist perception served as a rationale for Western world dominance. It should be said that whether one agrees with every one of Said’s details or not, there is no doubt his well researched and documented work has made most scholars more aware of their biases.

(e) Glick refuses to see Orientalism asjust an influential academic work. Instead, in what appears to be a pattern of illogical jumps, she claims that “in Orientalism, Said characterised all Western – and particularly American – scholarship on the Arab and Islamic worlds as one big conspiracy theory” designed to justify empire. This then is the heart of Said’s alleged “nihilistic” repudiation of Western scholarship. She particularly points to Said’s claim that “From the Enlightenment period through the present every European, in what he could say about the Orient, was a racist, an imperialist and almost totally ethnocentric”. While this is a far-reaching generalisation, it basically reflects an equally pervasive, very real Western cultural bias. What Glick describes as a “conspiracy theory” is Said’s scholarly demonstration of how that bias has expressed itself. And, it should be noted that such pervasive biases are not uniquely American nor even Western. Chinese, Japanese, Arab/Muslim, Hindu and Jewish civilisations have their own variants of such biases. Yet, it is Said’s effort to expose and ameliorate the orientalism of the West that seems to madden Caroline Glick.

(f) For Glick, Said’s suggestion that both past as well as many present scholars have culturally biased points of view of the Orient becomes an accusation that any “great scholar” with a classical Western worldview “is worse than worthless. If he is a white American, he is an agent of evil.” Glick is now building a real head of steam and her account becomes more and more grotesque. She now claims that Said’s work is “intellectual nihilism”. How so? Because it “champions narrative over evidence”. What Glick is implying here is that Said’s work is an anti-Western screed presented without evidence. This is demonstrably wrong, but nonetheless provides a platform for Glick’s further assertion that Said’s fantastical narrative is told in order to “manipulate students to engage in political violence against the United States.”

What is this all about?

Caroline Glick makes repeated illogical jumps. As egregious as these are, they actually point the way to her larger ideological agenda.

  1. Said is a terrorist because he opposes Israel and supports the Palestinians. Participation in the PLO is her proof of this. 
  2. Because Said is a terrorist, his throwing of a stone at the southern Lebanese border is a terrorist attack against Israel and its army. 
  3. Somehow, Said’s throwing the stone was also “a harbinger for the mob violence now taking place in many parts of America”. The connector here is Said’s tossing of an intellectual “rock” – his thesis presented in Orientalism.
  4. Just as his “rock attack” was terroristic, so Said’s book, Orientalism, is itself an act of terrorism as well as a “nihilistic” project. 
  5. It is all these nasty things rolled into one because it calls into question established cultural assumptions that had long underpinned colonialism and imperialism, and which also just happens to underpin Israel’s claim to legitimacy.
  6. But there is more. Glick tells us, “Said’s championing of the Palestinian war against Israel was part of a far wider post-colonialist crusade he waged against the United States. The purpose of his scholarship was to deny American professors the right to study and understand the world [in an orientalist fashion] by delegitimising them as nothing but racists and imperialists”.
  7. And finally, “Orientalism formed the foundation of a much broader campaign on campuses to delegitimise the United States as a political entity steeped in racism.”

Conclusion

Glick’s attack on Edward Said’s legacy is beset with leaps of illogic. So let me conclude this analysis with my own leap, hopefully a logical one, to an explanation of what may be Glick’s larger agenda. Glick is attempting to turn the ideological clock back to a time before decolonisation. Specifically, she wishes to resurrect an overall acceptance of Western colonialism as a benevolent endeavour whereby progress and civilisation were spread by a superior culture. 

Why would she want to do this? Because if we all believe this proposition, then Israel can be seen as a legitimate and normal state. After all, Israel is the last of the colonial settler states – the imposition of Western culture into the Orient. It rules over millions of Palestinian Arabs as the result of a European invasion made “legal” by a colonial document, the Balfour Declaration, and its acceptance by a pro-colonial League of Nations. Our post-colonial age in which Edward Said is a “superstar intellectual” is seen as a constant threat to Zionist Israel’s legitimacy.

Edward Said’s legacy provides a strong theoretical foundation for understanding why the Western imperialists thought and acted as they did, and hence helps both Western and non-Western peoples to confront their own modern historical situation. However, Glick cannot see any of this except through the Zionist perspective. Thus, Said’s legacy is just part of an anti-Israeli conspiracy – an attack on those scholars who support the legitimacy of an orientalist point of view and of the Zionist state. 

She also suggests that Said’s undoing of historically accepted biases lets loose the “mob violence” seen in the US. There is no evidence for this, but it may be Glick’s  roundabout way of undermining student support for Palestinian rights on American campuses. 

Ultimately, what Glick is interested in is preserving the image of Israel as a Western democratic enclave in an otherwise uncivilised sea of Arab and Islamic barbarians. That fits right into the traditional orientalist belief system and justifies the continuing US-Israeli alliance. Said has successfully called that perspective into question. Hence Glick’s assault on his legacy. 

Finally, Glick’s present attack on Said, and her attempt to tie his work into the protests that followed George Floyd’s murder, shows how frightened the defenders of one racist state, Zionist Israel, become when their principle ally, the United States, comes under attack for racist practices. Said as a “superstar” foe of all racism becomes the lighting rod for that fear. 

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“But is it good for the Jews?”

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Helen Thomas

On the death of Helen Thomas

In “American stooges”

David Harris

The ideologue’s tunnel vision: the case of US Zionist David Harris

In “American stooges”

Posted in Palestine Affairs, ZIO-NAZI, CampaignsComments Off on A Zionist attack on late American-Palestinian scholar Edward Said’s legacy

Adalah’s report to the UN detailing ‘Israel’s’ response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its negative impact on human rights

Posted by: Sammi Ibrahen,Sr

In response to a call by the UN, Adalah submitted a report to inform experts’ upcoming thematic statements and reports to the UN Human Rights Council or the General Assembly on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on human rights.

Adalah’s report spans many subjects such as the Israeli government’s excessive use of Emergency Regulations; discrimination against Palestinians regarding access to medical services, education and economic financial support; the lack of available data on COVID-19 and Palestinian citizens of Israel and delayed, limited health-related information in Arabic; insufficient economic measures taken to help Palestinian citizen workers, households, businesses and the exploitation of West Bank Palestinian workers in Israel and more.


• CLICK HERE to read the Major Findings of the report

• CLICK HERE to read the full report

Posted in Palestine Affairs, ZIO-NAZI, UNComments Off on Adalah’s report to the UN detailing ‘Israel’s’ response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its negative impact on human rights

Introducing Our New Safety In Neighbours Burglary Campaign


THERE’S SAFETY IN NEIGHBOURS

Our new Neighbourhood Watch campaign to prevent burglaries

Dear,

As lockdown eases in the UK, we’re expecting a rise in burglaries. We’ve partnered with the Home Office to create a new social media campaign to help keep people safe and continue the great work your scheme is already doing.

Our new Safety in Neighbours campaign is particularly exciting as it has a modern and eye-catching design to grab younger people’s attention and attract even more new members. Read more about the campaign below.

We need your help 
Please help us spread the word and share the campaign on your local Neighbourhood Watch’s social media pages and chat groups. You could also share the press release attached with your local news media and radio stations. 

•    Visit our campaign page
•    Watch our campaign video
•    Download our campaign social media pack
•    Share using #SafetyinNeighbours in the caption 
•    Tag Neighbourhood Watch in the post    
Facebook: @ourwatch    Twitter: @N_watch          Instagram: @neighbourhood.watch.insta
 
Help spread the word

 

More about our new campaign: Safety in Neighbours

The idea
Life’s safer when you know your neighbours. With more people looking out for unusual behaviour on your street, burglaries can be prevented. 

The design
It features our iconic black and yellow brand colours, but with a modern, animated twist to grab attention and stand out on social media.

The audience
We’ll target the most high-risk areas of England and Wales – but we need you to help us reach people everywhere. Our campaign is designed to appeal to a younger audience of 20 – 50 year olds.

The outcome
We’ll provide a pack of assets for you to share with members. It includes info on the WIDE combination of security measures,  which reduces the risk of burglary by nearly 50 times more than no security prevention measures, a prevention checklist, local crime map, and how to become a member.

The campaign 
We’ll promote it on Neighbourhood Watch’s main Facebook, Instagram and Twitter channels for 3 weeks from 27th July. Please help us by sharing on your local channels and do let us know about any local press you are able to generate. 

Find out more…


Best wishes

Cheryl

Posted in Campaigns, UKComments Off on Introducing Our New Safety In Neighbours Burglary Campaign

Summer Crime Prevention

Dear 
#Safestaycation – Robbery

We know a lot of people have had their holiday plans ruined or delayed recently and are planning a staycation this year.
If you’re holidaying at home we want you to have as happy and safe a time as possible. With a lot more people out and about now, thieves are sadly back at work.

So here’s a few tips from us when out and about:
While staying alert for the virus, stay alert to your surroundings and who is close to you. It takes pickpockets seconds to take a phone out of your pocket or a wallet out of your bag.
Keep those bags closed and close to you – even when picnicking – in busy parks and open spaces thieves can steal by ‘bag dipping.’
And if you’re out shopping keep your bag on you, ideally across the body, not hanging off the pushchair, where it could be easily snatched.
If you’d like a few more tips then check out our website
https://www.west-midlands.police.uk/your-options/cycle-theft
We hope you have a safe holiday at home and find some great new places to explore.
Message Sent By
Stefanie Sadler (Police, Engagement & Consultation officer, Birmingham Partnerships)

 

Posted in Campaigns, UKComments Off on Summer Crime Prevention

The 28 most outrageous lines from Donald Trump’s Mount Rushmore speech

Analysis by Chris Cillizza, CNN Editor-at-large

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Trump brings up Fauci’s approval rating during briefing

Jim Jordan plays violent video. See what it didn’t show

Democrat to Barr: Keep John Lewis’s name out of DOJ’s mouth

Fauci responds to Trump: I have not misled the public

GOP senator claims founding fathers saw slavery as ‘necessary evil’

Hoyer on unemployment cuts: It’s not $600 or bust

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Trump won’t say if Russian bounties came up in Putin call

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Trump tosses hats to supporters, golfs without a mask

Tapper hammers HHS assistant secretary on testing delays

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Trump walks out of briefing after CNN question

Barr asked about Russia election interference. Hear his response

Trump brings up Fauci’s approval rating during briefing

Jim Jordan plays violent video. See what it didn’t show

Democrat to Barr: Keep John Lewis’s name out of DOJ’s mouth

Fauci responds to Trump: I have not misled the public

GOP senator claims founding fathers saw slavery as ‘necessary evil’

(CNN)President Donald Trump jetted to South Dakota on Friday to deliver a paean to what he believes to be is a forgotten America, in the shadow of Mount Rushmore.The speech laid out Trump’s consistently grim vision for an America in which he is not its President as he engaged in his usual amount of fact-bending and breaking to serve his rhetorical and political purposes.I went through the transcript — and pulled out the lines you need to see.1. “Let us also send our deepest thanks to our wonderful veterans, law enforcement, first responders and the doctors, nurses and scientists working tirelessly to kill the virus.”This is the only time Trump mentions the coronavirus pandemic, which hit a record number of cases nationwide on Friday, during the entire speech. And away we go!2. “I am here as your President to proclaim, before the country and before the world, this monument will never be desecrated.”Uh, was there some sort of movement to tear down Mount Rushmore I was unaware of or….?3. “And yet, as we meet here tonight, there is a growing danger that threatens every blessing our ancestors fought so hard for, struggled, they bled to secure.”The nation under threat from the liberal horde is the theme of this speech — and Trump hits it HARD. Repeatedly. Also: There is nothing so motivating as fear in terms of driving people to the polls. Or so Trump hopes.4. “Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children.”Like I said5. “Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our founders, deface our most sacred memorials, and unleash a wave of violent crime in our cities.”This speech, tonally, is very, very similar to Trump’s inauguration address in which he cast a dark vision of America and promised “this American carnage stops right here and stops right now.”Trump tries to drag America backward on a very different July 4th6. “Many of these people have no idea why they are doing this, but some know exactly what they are doing.”In Trump’s mind, there are only two kinds of protesters: dupes who have no idea what they are even protesting and professional rabble-rousers like Antifa. That, of course, totally dismisses the idea that the protesters — or some large chunk of them — are committed believers that the police need to be reformed and that racial inequity remains a real and pressing problem in America.7. “This attack on our liberty, our magnificent liberty, must be stopped, and it will be stopped very quickly.”“Our magnificent liberty.”Trump uses Mount Rushmore address to rail against removal of monuments8. “We will expose this dangerous movement, protect our nation’s children, end this radical assault, and preserve our beloved American way of life.”Again, Trump leans heavily on fear. The left is going to ruin your children — if you let it!9. “In our schools, our newsrooms, even our corporate boardrooms, there is a new far left fascism that demands absolute allegiance.”I looked up the definition of “fascism.” It’s this: “A political philosophy, movement, or regime (such as that of the Fascisti) that exalts nation and often race above the individual and that stands for a centralized autocratic government headed by a dictatorial leader, severe economic and social regimentation, and forcible suppression of opposition.” Which, well, uh…10. “This left-wing cultural revolution is designed to overthrow the American Revolution.”This feels a little — maybe slightly — overdone?11. “The violent mayhem we have seen in the streets and cities that are run by liberal Democrats in every case is the predictable result of years of extreme indoctrination and bias in education, journalism, and other cultural institutions.”Make no mistake: This is the language of a full-out culture war. And Trump is stoking it because he believes doing so gives him the best chance to win a second term.12. “Our children are taught in school to hate their own country and to believe that the men and women who built it were not heroes, but that were villains.”I took a peek at the my kids’ curriculum just to double check this so I can now officially say there is nothing in there about hating America.13. “The radical view of American history is a web of lies.”Speaking of lies…. THE POINT — NOW ON YOUTUBE!In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to subscribe!14. “General Washington did not claim power, but simply returned to Mount Vernon as a private citizen.”“If he was smart, he would’ve put his name on it. You’ve got to put your name on stuff or no one remembers you.” — Trump on Washington and Mount Vernon.15. “[Jefferson] was an architect, an inventor, a diplomat, a scholar, a founder of one of the world’s great universities, and an ardent defender of liberty.”“Someone came along to resist him/Pissed him off until we had a two-party system/You haven’t met him yet, you haven’t had the chance/’cause he’s been kickin’ a** as the ambassador to France.”16. “Lincoln won the Civil War. He issued the Emancipation Proclamation. He led the passage of the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery for all time.”“I’ve always said I can be more presidential than any president in history except for Honest Abe Lincoln, when he’s wearing the hat. That’s tough, that’s tough. That was tough to beat.” — Donald Trump, September 201917. “They want to silence us, but we will not be silenced.”Trump has been leaning much more heavily into the “Silent Majority” idea first introduced into American political rhetoric by President Richard Nixon. “THE SILENT MAJORITY IS STRONGER THAN EVER!!!,” he tweeted earlier this month.18. “We will state the truth in full without apology.”Ahem.19. “And we are building the wall.”“Trump campaigns on border wall progress. There’s not much of it.” — Los Angeles Times, June 23, 202020. “We believe in equal opportunity, equal justice, and equal treatment for citizens of every race, background, religion and creed.”“Why do we want all these people from ‘sh*thole countries’ coming here?” — Donald Trump, 201821. “We want free and open debate, not speech codes and cancel culture.”“Republicans feel that Social Media Platforms totally silence conservatives voices. We will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen.” — Donald Trump, May 27, 202022. “Their goal is not a better America. Their goal is to end America.”Under this construct, anyone who stands against Trump’s is trying to bring about the “end’ of the country. OK.23. “For the sake of our honor, for the sake of our children, for the sake of our union, we must protect and preserve our history, our heritage, and our great heroes.”“Our heritage.”24. “We are the people who dreamed a spectacular dream — it was called Las Vegas in the Nevada desert — who built up Miami from the Florida marsh, and who carved our heroes into the face of Mount Rushmore.”As our Founding Fathers always said: “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas.”25. “We settled the Wild West, won two World Wars, landed American astronauts on the moon, and, one day very soon, we will plant our flag on Mars.”Space Force!26. “Nobody has ever done it like we have done it.”“Ain’t no Half-Steppin'” — Big Daddy Kane27. “Centuries from now, our legacy will be the cities we built, the champions we forged, the good that we did, and the monuments we created to inspire us all.”Wait, wait. We have a champion forge? How did I not know about this before?28. “I love your state. I love this country.”“I love lamp.” — Brick Tamblin. Yeah, this feels like a good place to end.

Posted in USA, PoliticsComments Off on The 28 most outrageous lines from Donald Trump’s Mount Rushmore speech

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