Tag Archive | "Gaza"

The Defiance that Launched Gaza’s Flaming Kites Cannot be Extinguished


NOVANEWS

By Jonathan Cook
Global Research

Url of this article:
https://www.globalresearch.ca/the-defiance-that-launched-gazas-flaming-kites-cannot-be-extinguished/5645297

First Israel built a sophisticated missile interception system named Iron Dome to neutralise the threat of homemade rockets fired out of Gaza.

Next it created technology that could detect and destroy tunnels Palestinians had cut through the parched earth deep under the fences Israel erected to imprison Gaza on all sides.

Israel’s priority was to keep Gaza locked down with a blockade and its two million inhabitants invisible.

Now Israel is facing a new and apparently even tougher challenge: how to stop Palestinian resistance from Gaza using flaming kites, which have set fire to lands close by in Israel. F-16 fighter jets are equipped to take on many foes but not the humble kite.

These various innovations by Palestinians are widely seen by Israelis as part of the same relentless campaign by Hamas to destroy their country.

But from inside Gaza, things look very different. These initiatives are driven by a mix of recognisably human emotions: a refusal to bow before crushing oppression; a fear of becoming complicit through silence and inaction in being erased and forgotten; and a compelling need to take back control of one’s life.

Palestinians encaged in Gaza, denied entry and exit by Israel via land, sea and air for more than a decade, know that life there is rapidly becoming unsustainable. Most young people are unemployed, much of the infrastructure and housing are irreparably damaged, and polluted water sources are near-unpotable.

After waves of military attacks, Gaza’s children are traumatised with mental scars that may never heal.

This catastrophe was carefully engineered by Israel, which renews and enforces it daily.

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The kites have long served as a potent symbol of freedom in Gaza. Children have flown them from the few spots in the tiny, congested enclave where people can still breathe – from rooftops or on Gaza’s beaches.

Five years ago, the film Flying Paper documented the successful efforts of Gaza’s children to set a new world record for mass kite-flying. The children defied Israel’s blockade, which prevents entry of most goods, by making kites from sticks, newspapers and scraps of plastic.

The children’s ambition was – if only briefly – to retake Gaza’s skies, which Israel dominates with its unseen, death-dealing drones that buzz interminably overhead and with missiles that can flatten a building in seconds.

A young girl observed of the kite’s lure:

“When we fly the kite, we know that freedom exists.”

A message scrawled on one read:

“I have the right to pride, education, justice, equality and life.”

But the world record attempt was not only about the children’s dreams and their defiance. It was intended to highlight Gaza’s confinement and to issue a reminder that Palestinians too are human.

That same generation of children have grown into the youths being picked off weekly by Israeli snipers at unarmed protests at the perimeter fence – the most visible feature of Israel’s infrastructure of imprisonment.

A few have taken up kite-flying again. If they have refused to put away childish things, this time they have discarded their childish idealism. Their world record did not win them freedom, nor even much notice.

After the snipers began maiming thousands of the demonstrators, including children, medics and journalists, for the impudence of imagining they had a right to liberty, the enclave’s youths reinvented the kite’s role.

If it failed to serve as a reminder of Palestinians’ humanity, it could at least remind Israel and the outside world of their presence, of the cost of leaving two million human beings to rot.

So the kites were set on fire, flaming emissaries that brought a new kind of reckoning for Israel when they landed on the other side of the fence.

Gaza’s inhabitants can still see the lands from which many of them were expelled during the mass dispossession of the Palestinian people in 1948 – under western colonial sponsorship – to create a Jewish state.

Not only were those lands taken from them, but the Jewish farming communities that replaced them now irrigate their crops using water Palestinians are deprived of, including water seized from aquifers under the West Bank.

The kites have rained fire down on this idyll created by Israel at the expense of Gaza’s inhabitants. No one has been hurt but Israel claims extinguishing the fires has already cost some $2 million and 7,000 acres of farmland have been damaged.

Sadly, given the profound sense of entitlement that afflicts many Israelis, a small dent in their material wellbeing has not pricked consciences about the incomparably greater suffering only a few kilometres away in Gaza.

Instead, Israel’s public security minister Gilad Erdan called last week for anyone flying a kite, even young children, to be shot. He and other ministers have argued that another large-scale military assault on Gaza is necessary to create what Erdan has termed “durable deterrence”.

That moment seems to be moving inexorably closer. The last few days have seen Israel launch punitive air strikes to stop the kites and Palestinian factions retaliate by firing significant numbers of rockets out of Gaza for the first time in years.

The Trump administration is no longer pretending to mediate. It has publicly thrown in its hand with Israel. It withdrew last week from the United Nations Human Rights Council, accusing it of being a “cesspool of political bias” after the council criticised Israel for executing Gaza’s unarmed demonstrators.

On a visit to the region last week, Jared Kushner, Donald Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, urged ordinary Palestinians to rebel against their leaders’ refusal to accept a long-awaited US peace plan that all evidence suggests will further undermine Palestinian hopes of a viable state.

Kushner is apparently unaware that the Palestinian public is expressing its will, for liberation, by protesting at the Gaza fence – and risking execution by Israel for doing so.

Meanwhile, Prince William is due in Israel on Monday, the first British royal to make an official visit since the mandate ended 70 years ago. While Kensington Palace has stressed that the trip is non-political, William will meet both Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas in an itinerary that has already been claimed by both sides as a victory.

From the vantage point of the Mount of Olives, from which he will view Jerusalem’s Old City, the prince may not quite manage to see the kite battles in Gaza’s skies that underscore who is Goliath and who is David. But he should see enough in the West Bank and occupied East Jerusalem to understand that western leaders have decisively chosen the side of Goliath.

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Nazi regime bans entry of medical delegation into Gaza


NOVANEWS
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Nazi occupation authorities on Sunday decided to prevent a Palestinian medical delegation from entering the Gaza Strip.

Ministry of Health said in a statement that Nazi regime refused to issue the necessary entry permits for the members of the medical delegation formed by the Palestinian Minister of Health in Ramallah Jawad Awwad to assist medical staff in Gaza.

The Ministry stressed that this ban is a further crime committed against the Gazan people who are also prevented from travelling abroad for treatment.

The Ministry called on international organizations to pressure the Nazi regime to allow medical teams to visit Gaza and help the staff working there.

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Why is the Nazi army finally worried about Gaza?


NOVANEWS
Why is the Israeli army finally worried about Gaza?
Gaza poverty

By Jonathan Cook in Nazareth

Last week Israeli military officials for the first time echoed what human rights groups and the United Nations have been saying for some time: that Gaza’s economy and infrastructure stand on the brink of collapse.

They should know.

More than 10 years ago the Israeli army tightened its grip on Gaza, enforcing a blockade on goods coming in and out of the tiny coastal enclave that left much of the 2-million-strong population there unemployed, impoverished and hopeless.

Since then, Israel has launched three separate major military assaults that have destroyed Gaza’s infrastructure, killed many thousands and left tens of thousands more homeless and traumatised.

Gaza is effectively an open-air prison, an extremely overcrowded one, with only a few hours of electricity a day and its ground water polluted by seawater and sewage.

Self-interest

After a decade of this horrifying experiment in human endurance, the Israeli army finally appears to be concerned about whether Gaza can cope much longer.

In recent days it has begun handing out forms, with more than a dozen questions, to the small number of Palestinians allowed briefly out of Gaza – mainly business people trading with Israel, those needing emergency medical treatment and family members accompanying them.

One question asks bluntly whether they are happy, another whom they blame for their economic troubles. A statistician might wonder whether the answers can be trusted, given that the sample group is so heavily dependent on Israel’s goodwill for their physical and financial survival.

But the survey does at least suggest that Israel’s top brass may be open to new thinking, after decades of treating Palestinians only as target practice, laboratory rats or sheep to be herded into cities, freeing up land for Jewish settlers. Has the army finally understood that Palestinians are human beings too, with limits to the suffering they can soak up?

According to the local media, the army is in part responding to practical concerns. It is reportedly worried that, if epidemics break out, the diseases will quickly spread into Israel.

And if Gaza’s economy collapses too, hundreds of thousands of Palestinians could be banging on Israel’s door – or rather storming its hi-tech incarceration fence – to be allowed in. The army has no realistic contingency plans for either scenario.

It may be considering too its image – and defence case – if its commanders ever find themselves in the dock at the International Criminal Court in the Hague accused of war crimes.

Worse to come

Nonetheless, neither Israeli politicians nor Washington appear to be taking the army’s warnings to heart. In fact, things look set to get worse.

Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu said last week there could be no improvements, no reconstruction in Gaza until Hamas agrees to give up its weapons – the only thing, in Hamas’s view, that serves as a deterrent against future Israeli attack.

Figures show Israel’s policy towards Gaza has been actually growing harsher. In 2017 exit permits issued by Israel dwindled to a third of the number two years earlier – and a hundredfold fewer than in early 2000. A few hundred Palestinian businesspeople receive visas, stifling any chance of economic revival.

The number of trucks bringing goods into Gaza has been cut in half – not because Israel is putting the inmates on a “diet”, as it once did, but because the enclave’s Palestinians lack “purchasing power”. That is, they are too poor to buy Israeli goods.

Netanyahu has resolutely ignored a plan by his transport minister to build an artificial island off Gaza to accommodate a sea port under Israeli or international supervision. And no one is considering allowing the Palestinians to exploit Gaza’s natural gas fields, just off the coast.

In fact, the only thing holding Gaza together is the international aid it receives. And that is now in jeopardy too.

Cutting a lifeline

The Trump administration announced last week it is to slash by half the aid it sends to Palestinian refugees via the UN agency UNRWA (United Nations Relief and Works Agency). Trump has proposed further cuts to punish Mahmoud Abbas, the increasingly exasperated Palestinian leader, for refusing to pretend any longer that the US is an honest broker capable of overseeing peace talks.

The White House’s difficulties are only being underlined as Mike Pence, the US vice-president, visits Israel as part of Trump’s supposed push for peace. He is being boycotted by Palestinian officials.

Palestinians in Gaza will feel the loss of aid severely. A majority live in miserable refugee camps set up after their families were expelled in 1948 from homes in what is now Israel. They depend on the UN for food handouts, health and education.

Backed by the Palestine Liberation Organisation’s legislative body, the Palestinian Central Council, Abbas has begun retaliating – at least rhetorically. He desperately needs to shore up the credibility of his diplomatic strategy in pursuit of a two-state solution after Trump recently hived off Palestine’s future capital, Jerusalem, to Israel.

Abbas threatened, if not very credibly, to end a security coordination with Israel he once termed “sacred” and declared as finished the Oslo accords that created the Palestinian Authority he now heads.

The lack of visible concern in Israel and Washington suggests neither believes he will make good on those threats.

But it is not Abbas’s posturing that Netanyahu and Trump need to worry about. They should be listening to Israel’s generals, who understand that there will be no defence against the fallout from the catastrophe looming in Gaza.

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Young photographers from Gaza capture moments of joy


NOVANEWS

Gaza’s young photographers record moments of happiness

An impoverished family from the north of Beit Lahia enjoys a light moment. The father is strumming a guitar, a young girl is dancing while the boys are playing music with simple household utensils. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Mouhamad Al-Barawi
ICRC 

A quick Google search for Gaza will show you multiple images of rubble and raw sewage pouring into the Mediterranean. These are the images that often appear in our mind together with the things we once heard or read about the place. For example, that it is “the world’s largest outdoor prison” or that it “will become unlivable”. But is this the way Gazans themselves see their homeland?

The photo competition we launched among young and extremely talented Gazan photographers was meant to answer this question. At first, we were not sure, whether a photo competition was even a good idea. Would people, who are trying to live their lives though the economic crisis and the electricity crisis, unable to access basic goods and services, have time and energy to spare for such a trivial and unnecessary thing as a photo competition? It turned out they did. And we were taken aback by the results.

Young photographers, contemplating their immediate surroundings, showed that life in Gaza is much more than crises, fences, isolation and the enormous suffering they cause. It is a quiet moment where a little fisherman, who almost seems like a part of the seascape, is looking under the sea surface, probably wondering what the future will be like for him and his generation, in a place where the young face 66% unemployment rate. It is children holding candles in the darkness, not metaphorical, but very real, as people have to organize their lives around four hours of electricity per day. It is also immense joy and laughter when an improvised family band explores music making potential of aluminum cooking pots.

This diversity of moments of happiness, laughter, quiet contemplation show that people of Gaza did not just put their lives on hold waiting for long overdue political solutions. Every single day, they demonstrate incredible resilience in the face of the harsh realities that surround them.

This photo shows the joy and fun that children can experience in the face of poverty. It relays a profound message: Happiness is in simplicity. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Fadi Badwan
This photo shows the joy and fun that children can experience in the face of poverty. It relays a profound message: Happiness is in simplicity. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Fadi Badwan
Children from Gaza sit in the trunk of an old car. They play music on a toy and enjoy the moment despite their poor living conditions. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Ahmad Hasaball
Children playing infront of their house seeking joy from the things around them. These kids lack toys and play grounds in light of the poor living conditions in Gaza. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Ahmad Salameh
Youth performing parkour stunts at the eastern borders of Khan Younis. Due to the scarcity of playing areas and limited resources, they are forced to practice their sport in the empty areas near the borders. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Mohamad Dahman
Raees is a deaf boy who doesn’t stop smiling despite his disability. He plays with a wheel and a stick with his brother, in east of Jabalia, near the borders, where they reside in tents. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Ahmad Hijazi
A Palestinian girl plays with her doll during the power outage. Gaza suffers from power cuts reaching up to 20 hours a day. CC BY-NC-ND / ICR Ibrahim Nofal
A child from Deir Al-Balah refugee camp in Gaza. CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Ayesh Haroun

… More Photos

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Gaza, this “poor desperate place”: Waiting for the end?


NOVANEWS
Misery in the Gaza Strip

How it looks to an anxious family on the inside

By Stuart Littlewood

Every Palestinian I met on my visits to the Holy Land urged me to tell their story when I got home. Some have written to me with very moving accounts of misery and excruciating hardship under Israel’s brutal occupation, reinforcing the appalling truths I’d seen for myself.

Two years ago a young woman, a war-weary mother of three in a Gaza refugee camp, wrote to tell me that schools in Gaza were working in two or three shifts a day, “especially in areas where displaced people of the last war still shelter in UNRWA [United Nations Relief and Works Agency] schools – they don’t have any other place to go.”

She also said it’s “difficult for us to live or to leave” and “We just dream of leading a decent life.”

Let’s call her Amal, which means Hope in Arabic. The pseudonym is her idea. She has a university degree and her English is remarkably good. Palestinians, especially the women, are very keen on education and determined to pursue it as best they can. Her message powerfully described her little family’s situation in the aftermath of Israel’s seven-week genocidal assault (Operation Protective Edge) the previous year which killed 2,250, mostly civilians, did massive damage to homes and infrastructure, and brought Gaza almost to its knees. She told how she and her neighbours were overwhelmed by death, destruction, grief and chronic deprivation.

I relayed her words in an article titled How on earth do they survive in that ‘hell called Gaza’“? in May 2014.

Amal’s latest email is again in three instalments because of severe power disruption and internet transmission problems. She tells me to edit or rewrite as I think fit, but I’ve hardly touched it. Only a word here and there has been changed for clarity.

Bazaar of bad dreams

  • ”I have nothing new to tell you about except that things are getting a lot worse, so it is frustrating. My grandmother passed away a few months ago and that left me depressed. She was so dear and pretty. She was the last member of my family who witnessed Al-Nakba(1948 Palestinian “catastrophe”) and used to tell us stories about how they were happy there, living peacefully in their homeland, and how they fled or were expelled from their homes.
  • “She told us about massacres, the destruction of Arab villages, years of displacement and oppression, and how we became refugees as a result; and how what is called the state of Israel was declared. My grandmother told us stories like a bazaar of bad dreams about losing everything, and how the members of each family were displaced into the refugee camps in Palestine, refugee camps in the Gaza Strip and West Bank, refugee camps in Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, and in other parts of the earth, enduring the worst kinds of pain, discrimination and suffering but with hope and faith that we will return one day.
  • ”In the aftermath of the hostilities of June 1967 and the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, more refugee camps are established to include new waves of displaced persons. My grandmother is not here to tell us more stories; however, I can’t forget. I’m a refugee by origin and I still live in a refugee camp that lacks adequate facilities and services.
  • ”People in the refugee camps keeps good social relationships but endure extreme poverty, frustration and insecurity. UNRWA barely takes the responsibility to provide the basic services of education, health and social services. May your soul rest in peace, my grandmother, in a place where you no longer suffer the injustice of being a Palestinian from Gaza.

Punished by the Palestinian Authority, their own people

  • ”In the besieged enclave of the Gaza Strip you don’t know where to begin when talking about humanitarian crises. Electricity is still a luxury and we receive up to two hours in 24 hours as a recent agreement between the Palestinian Authority and Israel reduces Gaza’s electricity by another 40 per cent. It is one of several punitive measures by the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank against Hamas’s de facto government in Gaza. These measures included a 30 per cent cut in the wages of employees of public sector in Gaza, which means that more households are falling under the poverty line.
  • ”Due to the horrible rates of poverty and unemployment an employee has to provide for his own family and some of his relatives’ households as well. Those employees were told by the PA to stop attending their workplaces following the military coup in 2007 and they stay at home with severe social and psychological strains. Some of them committed suicide or crimes.
  • ”Another punitive measure includes the very poor families which benefit from the social safety net as thousands of them have their humble benefits cut. The worst one is the cutting of medical supplies and medications, threatening the lives of thousands of persons who suffer serious illnesses. The referral system to West Bank hospitals is cancelled too.
  • ”The acute shortage in power has become a water catastrophe as it affects the availability of water for household use, with supply being dangerously low resulting in even poorer quality of water. The inability to treat the wastewater in Gaza due to the lack of electricity is threatening to contaminate the water supplies. The pumping of untreated wastewater into the sea poses a major risk of environmental and health hazards and deprives people of the only entertainment place. Fuel reserves for hospital generators will run out soon with obvious threats to the wellbeing of patients.
  • ”Weather is unexceptionally hot this summer which increases the suffering of people whose utmost wish becomes to drink cold water or to run the fan. It is really a dilemma!

Hamas chiefs living it up

  • ”The Rafah crossing [to Egypt] is closed. It has been opened for very few days only in 2017. More than 30,000 persons are registered to get out Gaza for critical reasons. Those who have no pressing reasons to get out Gaza may include me and the rest of Gaza’s residents. It is like a joke – I don’t own a passport as I can’t dream to use it.
  • ”Egypt uses the military instability in Sinai as an excuse for not opening the crossing. I really can’t describe in words the suffering of people who need to leave Gaza for medical treatment and educational scholarship abroad, and people with residential and business or professional dealings. You can simply imagine yourself as a prisoner.
  • ”I don’t mean to disturb you with all this amount of bad circumstances with no prospect of detente or even easing of strains. I don’t know how much we can really bear this. The most important thing which we all think about is why the Hamas regime is determined to stick to governing this poor, desperate place called Gaza.
  • ”It’s simply because Hamas members are leading luxurious lives in Gaza. They own money and power to solve their problems. They live in palaces, drive 4×4 vehicles, have their electricity generators and free fuel to run them, got jobs for themselves and their wives and sons, run their own businesses and collect as much as taxes for themselves. They implement an external agenda and receive support from several countries, mainly Qatar and Iran.
  • ”On the other side, President Abbas in the West Bank punishes only Gazan people and his measures don’t hit the internal or external interests of Hamas. Also, Egypt punishes our people by closing the borders. The international community doesn’t care, especially in view of the many other hot-spots in the Middle East that attract attention and support. In such a context, holding out hope (Amal) that conditions will improve is against all logic. It is the same like holding out hope of returning to historic Palestine.”

So hope is dwindling for Amal and her family, and for all the others trapped in Gaza with nowhere to run and no means to escape. They can only pray the almost daily Israeli air-strikes miss them as they await with dread the next major blitz, which will surely reduce Gaza to an uninhabitable ruin.

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Gaza: Life under Siege


NOVANEWS

Dear friends and colleagues

PCHR will resume working on the narratives.

This year coincides with the tenth anniversary of the illegal and inhumane collective punishment of two million people who live on the 365 square kilometer area that is the Gaza Strip. The PCHR continuously documents and reports on the illegality of the siege to raise awareness and foster accountability, but these reports do not emphasize the personal, the human story and the real pain and suffering of the two million Gazans. The narratives are dedicated to the latter, they seek to highlight the intolerable suffering of ordinary people as a result the siege by giving the victims a face and a voice and telling their own personal story.

 الوصف: narative

Life under Siege: Artist of War

Mohammed Abu Hashish, a young and skilled Gazan sculptor, matured in very harsh conditions due to the occupation. He had to overcome many obstacles and, instead of surrendering, decided to portray his anguish and grief in high-end art pieces.

Mohamed was born in Rafah on November 11, 1988 and raised in a big family consisting of a father, a mother, three girls and four boys. Like most kids in Gaza he studied at UNRWA schools, where he started to develop a passion for art at an early age and revealed it by drawing humble pieces on the board. At the time, artistic skills were given no attention nor encouragement in school and his decision to study fine arts at al-Aqsa University did not bring him any recognition by society either. However, his talent was quickly recognized by his professor, who offered him a job at his private interior design business. With his help, Mohammed developed connections with other interior architects in the country, gained experience, opened his own atelier and started giving arts classes to school children.

His journey was put on hold during the 2014 offensive, which had a major impact on Mohammed’s life on both a personal and professional level. His family lost a son, Hani, who for Mohammed “wasn’t just a brother or a friend; he was also my assistant in work”. The connection the two brothers had was indescribable, Mohammed said with his eyes full of tears.

The family received the news of Hani’s death on Monday July 23 2014, during Iftar time. They were asked to go to the hospital to identify the body. Hoping and praying to god not to find his brother in the hospital’s mortuary, he recognized Hani’s black shirt and navy pants, reminding him of the last time he saw his brother. Mohammed adds with a shiver how “the bodies were carbonized, and unrecognizable”. As he describes, “the structure of the skull was absent, the head’s skin was torn apart, there was no body, just a part of one shoulder, the spine, one leg and another half of a leg.” Mohammed’s eyes were full of tears, while saying that “if I knew he would leave the house and never comeback, I wouldn’t have let him go”.

For a while Mohammed gave up on life and could not do any art – it seemed as if life had stopped. However, he already had an idea for an exhibition before the war, inspired by the emotional experience of finding a baby’s dead body while burying his own grandmother. The experience of losing his brother and seeing the humiliating condition his body was in, strengthened his feeling that every human being deserves to live and be buried in dignity. After a year of grieve, Mohammed returned to his atelier and started a project of producing pieces of hands and feet made of beeswax. The texture of beeswax portrayed honesty to him and he thought that the dimensions and aesthetics of it would resemble the human body, particularly as the color is very close to the human skin. Inspired by his dead brother, Mohammed did not want the project to focus on his personal experience only, but to be devoted to civilian victims of war in general. He created nine pieces from beeswax, which became to be the art pieces for his exhibition “Karamat”.

الوصف: narative2

The exhibition’s title derived its meaning from human dignity, and honor, resembling the Palestinians daily struggle for values the Occupying Power tries to take from them. Karamat reflected the brutal and sad reality Palestinians live in today. The importance of the exhibition was not only to display art, but to show the personal human shock Mohammed and hundreds of families have faced. The 2014 Israeli offensive resulted in the killing of 2,216 Palestinians – of whom many were buried with their body parts missing. No one on earth would tolerate burying a sibling, relative or a friend with half of their body missing. The sophisticated pieces reflect the passion, anger and frustration triggered by war. They symbolize the concept of life and death.

Despite the closure, the tragic consequences of the restricted freedom of movement and hard living conditions, Mohammed participated in several local and international exhibitions and workshops. Among them are: “Our Diaries in Gaza”, which was exhibited in Amman; “Traces”, an exhibition held in Ramallah; and “Blooming Ideas”, which was shown in Gaza, Jerusalem and other parts of Palestine. For his outstanding contribution to the sculptural field, he won Gaza’s First Festival prize for Fine Arts in 2010. His latest and most important exhibition, Karamat, was held in cooperation with the Qattan foundation and the French Cultural Center. Despite the severe restrictions on the movement of civilians and goods by the Israeli forces, Israel was unable to stop Mohammed in his ambition to reveal his artwork to the world.

PCHR seeks to emphasize cases like Mohammed’s to show how the closure affects their everyday life. They are civilians asking for their fundamental rights. The notion of human rights is regularly being violated as Palestinians are subjected to war crimes and crimes against humanity. The collective punishment imposed by Israel as well as the 2014 offence had disastrous consequences on the lives of about 1.8 million people.

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Special relationship between Israel and the United States goes deep


The special relationship between Israel and the United States goes deep…real deep. It’s based on security, conflict and most of all money. Most of it for the Israeli military. But with over 1,400 killed and 8,200 wounded (and counting) in Gaza in July and the Israeli military’s long list human rights abuses, is this special relationship worth the price?The federal reserve is a privately owned Jewish bank, look it up.. American politicians are bought and paid for by Jewish dollars printed out of thin air!

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Al-Quds day is international Solidarity of the legitimate rights of the Palestine.


Al-Quds day is international Solidarity of the legitimate rights of the Palestine.
Do not forget to participate in Al-Quds day rally to support the downtrodden and condemn Neo-Racism and Genocide in Palestine.

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Nazi have banned construction material in Gaza.


 

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